Did India help US in Osama Bin Laden raid?

Discussion in 'Pakistan' started by Daredevil, Sep 11, 2012.

  1. Daredevil

    Daredevil On Vacation! Administrator

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    Did India help US in Osama Bin Laden raid? US Navy SEAL reveals

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    New Delhi: The ‘revelation’ made by former Navy SEAL Mark Owen in his book titled “No Easy Day: The Firsthand Account of the Mission that Killed Osama bin Laden” is a story revealed. Not only the entire gunfight is interesting, but the route taken by the Black Hawk helicopter is also interesting as well as warranting.

    According to news published on RedState, “Another detail in No Easy Day that is interesting enough to warrant some additional questions and discussion is the infiltration route taken by the two MH-60s that carried the assault teams from Jalalabad, Afghanistan to Abbottabad, Pakistan.”

    The report as published by RedState further says, “The fourteenth page of images in No Easy Day contains a map showing the routes taken by the two flights of helicopters: the Black Hawks taking the assaulters to Abbottabad, and the MH-47 Chinooks carrying a quick reaction force (QRF) and forward area refueling point (FARP) team. While the latter flew due east to a staging area northwest of Abbottabad, the former flight is shown on Owen’s map as crossing over Pakistan’s eastern border with India before looping around and approaching Abbottabad from the southeast, rather than approaching directly from the west (or west-northwest).”

    This raises some obvious questions including:

    Did the Indian Government comply with the US to provide alternative route for attacking Osama bin Laden?

    Did India provide intelligence inputs to carry out Operation Neptune Spear?

    If at all India granted permission to use its airspace station, under what condition the permission was granted?

    Also, did India provide US an alternative rout back into Pakistan after the operation was completed?

    Was India informed about the Operation Neptune Spear with its real motive or it was a cover story?

    “It’s important to note at this point that this discussion is based on a single low-detail graphic from an account that was neither vetted nor confirmed by the US Government. At no point in the text of No Easy Day is the route to Abbottabad discussed (as opposed to the return trip, which is dealt with in some detail); in fact, Owen writes, most of the team slept on the way in,” reports RedState.

    Further, Owen’s map appears to define Pakistan’s eastern border as the western boundary of Kashmir, the disputed territory that is bisected into Pakistani- and Indian-administered territories by the Line of Control, established in 1972, and it is difficult to tell whether the image was intended to show that the helicopters’ route crossed the LOC.

    However, the route appears to take the Americans in the vicinity of Uri, in Indian territory, says the report in RedState.

    It certainly isn’t beyond the realm of possibility that India, which has been called a “key ally in the fight against global terrorism,” would have provided assistance to the United States.

    Did India see enough opportunity in Operation Neptune Spear that it provided access both to airspace and to sensitive intelligence on Pakistani air defenses and infiltration routes?

    One simple map in No Easy Day certainly raises some interesting questions about Indian involvement in the most famous raid of the war on terror, and while we may never know the answers for certain, they are certainly worth asking, says RedState report.

    After all, who knows whether the next unauthorized disclosure about the bin Laden raid might provide some answers about that very subject.

    Image courtesy: No Easy Day - The Firsthand Account of the Mission that Killed Osama bin Laden
     
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  3. Tolaha

    Tolaha Senior Member Senior Member

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    Would feel great to know that India was in some way involved in the killing of Osama. But I don't believe for a moment that anything like this could have happened. With the kind of secrecy involved in this entire raid, Americans would be foolish to give out any details to outsiders.
     
  4. W.G.Ewald

    W.G.Ewald Defence Professionals/ DFI member of 2 Defence Professionals

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    I believe trackwhack pointed out Owen's map in this forum in another thread on Owen's book.
     
  5. hit&run

    hit&run Elite Member Elite Member

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    Information of RAW cooperation with CIA on Pakistan has never earned even a single line in terms of admission or disclosure by either side.
     
  6. Blackwater

    Blackwater Veteran Member Veteran Member

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    Did India help US in Osama Bin Laden raid? US Navy SEAL reveals

    New Delhi: The ‘revelation’ made by former Navy SEAL Mark Owen in his book titled “No Easy Day: The Firsthand Account of the Mission that Killed Osama bin Laden” is a story revealed. Not only the entire gunfight is interesting, but the route taken by the Black Hawk helicopter is also interesting as well as warranting.

    According to news published on RedState, “Another detail in No Easy Day that is interesting enough to warrant some additional questions and discussion is the infiltration route taken by the two MH-60s that carried the assault teams from Jalalabad, Afghanistan to Abbottabad, Pakistan.”

    The report as published by RedState further says, “The fourteenth page of images in No Easy Day contains a map showing the routes taken by the two flights of helicopters: the Black Hawks taking the assaulters to Abbottabad, and the MH-47 Chinooks carrying a quick reaction force (QRF) and forward area refueling point (FARP) team. While the latter flew due east to a staging area northwest of Abbottabad, the former flight is shown on Owen’s map as crossing over Pakistan’s eastern border with India before looping around and approaching Abbottabad from the southeast, rather than approaching directly from the west (or west-northwest).”

    This raises some obvious questions including:

    Did the Indian Government comply with the US to provide alternative route for attacking Osama bin Laden?

    Did India provide intelligence inputs to carry out Operation Neptune Spear?

    If at all India granted permission to use its airspace station, under what condition the permission was granted?

    Also, did India provide US an alternative rout back into Pakistan after the operation was completed?

    Was India informed about the Operation Neptune Spear with its real motive or it was a cover story?

    “It’s important to note at this point that this discussion is based on a single low-detail graphic from an account that was neither vetted nor confirmed by the US Government. At no point in the text of No Easy Day is the route to Abbottabad discussed (as opposed to the return trip, which is dealt with in some detail); in fact, Owen writes, most of the team slept on the way in,” reports RedState.

    Further, Owen’s map appears to define Pakistan’s eastern border as the western boundary of Kashmir, the disputed territory that is bisected into Pakistani- and Indian-administered territories by the Line of Control, established in 1972, and it is difficult to tell whether the image was intended to show that the helicopters’ route crossed the LOC.

    However, the route appears to take the Americans in the vicinity of Uri, in Indian territory, says the report in RedState.

    It certainly isn’t beyond the realm of possibility that India, which has been called a “key ally in the fight against global terrorism,” would have provided assistance to the United States.

    Did India see enough opportunity in Operation Neptune Spear that it provided access both to airspace and to sensitive intelligence on Pakistani air defenses and infiltration routes?

    One simple map in No Easy Day certainly raises some interesting questions about Indian involvement in the most famous raid of the war on terror, and while we may never know the answers for certain, they are certainly worth asking, says RedState report.

    After all, who knows whether the next unauthorized disclosure about the bin Laden raid might provide some answers about that very subject.

    Image courtesy: No Easy Day - The Firsthand Account of the Mission that Killed Osama bin Laden


    Did India help US in Osama Bin Laden raid? US Navy SEAL reveals - daily.bhaskar.com
     

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