Desperate PhD student kills self over caste discrimination

Discussion in 'Religion & Culture' started by AVERAGE INDIAN, Nov 27, 2013.

  1. AVERAGE INDIAN

    AVERAGE INDIAN EXORCIST Senior Member

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    The 26-year-old PhD student was in the middle of a big research project when he committed suicide by eating poison in his room on the campus of the University of Hyderabad in India on Sunday.
    His death would lead to a four-hour protest from his fellow students, who stormed the vice-chancellor’s office with claims of caste discrimination as the cause of his death.
    Their case was simple:
    The second-year student, identified as M. Venkatesh, 26, had been researching at the Defence Research and Development Organization and supported the Advanced Centre for Research in High Energy Materials on campus.
    Venkatesh’s fellos students said that he was a high-achieving student who had published three academic research papers, but that he’d not been assigned a permanent guide by the industry as a result of his caste.
    The protest, which launched just after 12:30 p.m., didn’t end until the vice chancellor, Ramakrishna Ramaswamy, issued a written statement four hours later, in which he admitted that Venkatesh might still be alive today had there been better policies in place.
    "Suicides on the campus are a failure of the system and steps that have been suggested in order to address the serious issues of the students need our immediate attention," he said in the statement, noting that a committee would be set up Monday to investigate the situation. Results are due to be reported Tuesday.
    "The director of the Centre was in the process of constituting a doctoral committee for Venkatesh and assigning him a guide. His previous research supervisor retired in May and the present director took over in July. Venkatesh's work seemed to have been going well and his research was published," Ramasway said.
    Venkatesh’s case brings up a sensitive issue among Indians. While the caste system has been outlawd for years, the Indian government has often opposed efforts to put issues regarding caste discrimination in the public eye—and this affects an estimated 260 million people around the world, according to a 2010 Telegraph report.
    Though legislation exists, it’s not well-implemented, nor is it actively enforced. This means that India’s 200 million Dalits, previously known as the “untouchables,” are still suffering from a shocking array of criminal discrimination—including forced prostitution and other forms of “modern slavery.”
    One group of volunteers is out to end this discrimination by putting a face on it—they’re gathering video evidence of the discrimination.
    “The videos show a man who complains that a local barber refuses to cut his hair; a group of children who are forced to eat lunch separately from their classmates; women who walk for hours to fetch water because they are not allowed to use the public tap in the village,” says the group’s website. “None of the footage on its own is particularly dramatic. But it documents a persistent form of social discrimination – untouchability.”
    Even Desmund Tutu felt compelled to comment on the situation, hinting that it would be natural for Africans and Dalits to form an alliance since both groups had struggled under various circumstances.
    “More of us should be concerned about it [caste discrimination] and perhaps be interrogating the other part of Indian society as to why they are allowing this to continue if it is an egalitarian society. I mean your Constitution says so,” Tutu said.

    :frusty::frusty:
    Read more: Desperate PhD student kills self over caste discrimination
     
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  3. Free Karma

    Free Karma Senior Member Senior Member

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    Out of curiosity I googled..

    So the photo on the digital journal website, is a random photo from of someone from a slum, why couldnt they use the real photo of a person?

    http://mobiletoi.timesofindia.com/m...erabad&edname=&articleid=Ar00303&publabel=TOI

    Also, the protest was due to a suicide, where the students *allege* discrimination, the article sees to take this as accepted fact., and from there on, pretty much goes on to talk about "evil India"..you know in college how you students strike...taking this as accepted fact and basing a whole article to bash a country is stupidity.

    It's more about student suicide than anything else , the chancellors statement was about preventing more of the same and the researcher happened to be a dalit, the western media of course doesnt want all that, they've confirmed what they wanted to. Disgusting piece of journalism.
     
    Last edited: Nov 27, 2013
  4. dhananjay1

    dhananjay1 Regular Member

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    One group of volunteers is out to end this discrimination by putting a face on it—they’re gathering video evidence of the discrimination.
    “The videos show a man who complains that a local barber refuses to cut his hair; a group of children who are forced to eat lunch separately from their classmates; women who walk for hours to fetch water because they are not allowed to use the public tap in the village,” says the group’s website. “None of the footage on its own is particularly dramatic. But it documents a persistent form of social discrimination – untouchability.”

    Sounds like classic missionary propaganda nonsense.
     
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  5. Coalmine

    Coalmine Regular Member

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    never seen discrimination based on caste in my college nor anywhere heard. I have seen discrimination based on caste in villages only not in urban areas.
     

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