Democracy in crisis

Discussion in 'Politics & Society' started by Vyom, Dec 25, 2010.

  1. Vyom

    Vyom Seeker Elite Member

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    CAG scam, Adarsh Housing Society scam, 2G scam… the cancer of corruption seems all-pervasive. As we transit from licence raj to crony capitalism, it is the ordinary citizen who is being short-changed in the process. What lies ahead? Former bureaucrat GOPALKRISHNA GANDHI and author and former CEO GURCHARAN DAS look at the prevailing scenario and the possibilities of change and hope…

    We, the people

    If the world's largest democracy is also one of the most corrupt ones, we are as much to blame as the self-serving politician. Is there any hope for redemption?

    GOPALKRISHNA GANDHI

    It is all politics.

    What else can you expect of them? They are politicians after all…

    We hear those remarks routinely. And we make them ourselves.

    The words ‘politics' and ‘politician' are certainly in trouble.

    Politicians, in fact, are in trouble. A trouble that is largely of their making.

    Exceptions remain, of politicians who are neither in difficulty nor controversy. And thank God for that. But these exceptions are becoming more and more exceptional. A ‘standard politician' is now seen, unfairly to the exceptions, as someone void of ideals but replete with ambition, a pygmy in reliability but a giant in cunning, with almost no ‘law' ruling him, no ‘principle' governing him, save ruthless self-interest.

    And the ‘house of politics' that once graciously roofed men of the veracity of Dadabhai Naoroji and Lokamanya Tilak is no longer regarded as a ‘good' address. This is unfortunate for that ‘ house' , even in our post-Independence, post-Nehru, post-Patel, post-Rajaji times, gave out of its ageing grace, space to men of the transparency of Jayaprakash Narayan.

    Politics is no longer the house of beliefs and the home of action that we have known it to be. It has become a Ground Zero. A zone with demarcated parking, vending, loitering and berthing lots occupied or ‘to let' and of course available for being claimed and seized. As also to be ‘re-claimed' or ‘re-seized'. It is a zone into which a ‘decent' man or woman will hesitate to venture.

    Politics today is about territories and power-games. It is about clout.

    Democracy is meant to be about open discussion, un-coerced persuasion.

    Ours is that. We do have free and frank campaigning, free and fair voting. We have deserving candidates fighting clean, fighting hard, fighting to win honourably or to lose blamelessly.

    Two sides

    But that, alas, is not the whole story. Our democracy is also about manipulation. It is also about undeserving candidates fighting dirty, fighting sly, winning dishonourably with a smirk or losing unsportingly with vengeance under the breath.

    Our elections, instead of being a happy circle of recurring choices, have turned into a circularity of manipulations, a Giant Wheel where public entertainment is assured through cacophonous blarings and of dirt raised from slime-sodden grounds, and dangers to life and limb as well. You return from it dizzied and dazed. And dazzled, too, because of the largesse of freebies that come along with the giant gyration.

    The world's largest our democracy is. Free and fair our elections are, to the world's clear awe.

    But leaders in the art and science of contrivance and improvisation that Indians are, we have managed to make our large democracy grow ever larger in size, but also become ever smaller, even petty, in the actual workings.

    Politics cuts deals with masters of the herding method and with the Mafiosi, whether for the success of rallies, for elections or for swollen egos to clash often with unashamed violence, for small-time scores to get settled and for money, huge money, to be spent to buy, seize, occupy turf or to retain a precarious hold on it.

    It is no surprise, therefore, that if MPs schooled in the law comprised 35 per cent of the first Lok Sabha, less than 15 per cent of the law-makers comprising the present Lok Sabha have a law background. I will say nothing of the percentage of alleged law-breakers among them. There is another – surreal – fact that hits the eye. The number of male MPs who wore rings on their fingers to propitiate the Gods, or strings around their wrists to ward off the evil eye, in the first Lok Sabha led by Jawaharlal Nehru (who wore neither) must have been no more than a handful. Invoking the Almighty for Grace is natural. But He can be spared anxieties over politicians' personal prospects, or for security from the ire of those that have been hurt, harmed and made enemies of. Today, a huge number of legislators across all party divides bear those nervous adornments. This may augment their sense of security, but not that of those who have, so trustingly of their intelligence and knowledge, elected them.

    How is knowledge prized amongst politicians? Ask a politican today, by surprise, what he is, what he in his heart of hearts believes or stands for and he may get genuinely puzzled. Even shocked, as if by a contact with a live electric wire. But ask him what he fights for, what he wants to win for, and he will be more at ease. And will invoke an iconic leader. Icons are a balm against the painful embarrassment of ignorance. They are a substitute for thought today.

    Lack of vision

    Short-termism is the ruling political philosophy, and quid pro quo the ruling political currency becoming more quid than quo with each passing day.

    The politician has always gambled with political destiny. In India, and everywhere else. Gladstone and Disraeli did in their time. Jefferson and Lincoln did in theirs. Naoroji and Gokhale, Satyamurti and Chittaranjan Das did in our land. More recently, Kamaraj, EMS, Annadurai took huge risks. But they did so with gleaming dice thrown from clean hands for play on a chequer-board governed by rules. Today the politician gambles with a die so rough-used that none of the pips on its six faces can be read. He wagers, but to win what?

    He probably does not know himself. Because he scarcely knows his own self. How can he? So overlaid is his face with expressions, especially obsequious smiles and ear to ear grins worn for others' (including yours, mine and the media's) benefit. Cartoon caricatures, in the hands of Shankar, Laxman, Thanu, Kutty, Abu Abraham, Puri, Sudhir Dar, used to resemble their subjects. Today, politicians have begun to resemble their own caricatures.

    Can anything, anything worthwhile, be expected of so hugely compromised a person?

    So, then, is this it?

    Is there any hope for redemption?

    There had better be!

    Precisely for having known better, we cannot settle for less than a redemption.

    Politicians must be helped to see, and not through the mechanism of elections alone, but through responsible and calm public articulations that they cannot afford to be seen as a byword for financial impropriety, administrative dereliction and valuational grossnesses.

    But we cannot end with laying the blame squarely on politicians. They are artistes, many very gifted, many more not. Change has to come in the script of the play. It has, in other words, to start with ‘We The People'.

    We have to accept the inconvenient fact that if our politics has been debased, we have had a hand in the process. We have often chosen what we have regarded as ‘the lesser of the two evils', have remained silent when politics has hi-jacked the law of the land, have condoned when we should have excoriated, looked the other way when we should have looked straight-in-the-eye. And we are as short-termist as any politician. ‘What we are', Jiddu Krishnamurti has said unforgettably, ‘the world is'.

    Is it too late for this cleansing?

    It is late, but not too late.

    Why do I say this?

    I say this, for, ‘we the people' are not alone. We have seen how, in recent weeks, our Constitutional authorities have made common cause with common sense and the common man to bring to justice great and palpable wrongs done by politicians and by those working under or with them. These authorities, headed by the Supreme Court of India and the Comptroller and Auditor General of India, are there, edifices and instrumentalities, fashioned by the higher sense of our early law-makers, to be utilised in the national interest.

    Epic literature is not my strong point and I am wary of analogies drawn from mythic narratives to garnish contemporary analyses. But if Rajaji had been alive, I think the kathakar in him would have been tempted to say that these Constitutional authorities are like the Sanjivani Hill of the Ramayana where life-restoring herbs may be found for the stricken body politic. I have pictured the RTI Act and the instrumentality of the PIL as being sited on that very Hill, bringing the relief of justice to stricken people and causes. ‘Civil society' and NGOs contain energies and means for political redressal that can be truly restorative if used with due care, non-vindictively and without generating its own counter-egoism.

    Possibility of healing

    Herbs lie there, of healing, sharp and pungent though they may be, even bitter, awaiting use to protect exceptions from the rule of political debasement, to prevent further debasement, and to expel from the system the toxins we recognise.

    No Godlike figure may be expected to descend from the sky of our political fortune. Such figures did ‘appear', in a galactic shower in the last century and the one before it. But that beneficent process seems to be on a long sabbatical right now. And so it is within the same landfill of political ambition and corruption that we must help, encourage and motivate endangered and brave political exceptions to rise. And when our Courts and our Constitutional authorities speak harsh truths, not honeyed words, we must respect those as speaking our voice, a voice that goes beyond the short-termist and the populist, the vindictive, and the sectionally selfish and become We The People in the true sense of the term.

    And thereby dredge the national waters of their mire.

    Gopalkrishna Gandhi is a writer and former Governor of West Bengal.

    Chance to start afresh

    While those guilty in the 2G scam should be brought to book, we should not forget that corruption persists in India because we have been half-hearted in our reforms, says GURCHARAN DAS.

    There is a lesson in the morality play that we are witnessing today which has been triggered off by the 2G financial scandal. It comes from a scene in Malcolm Gladwell’s recent collection of essays called What the Dog Saw, and I have condensed it below:

    On the afternoon of October 23, 2006, Jeffrey Skilling sat at a table at the front of a federal courtroom in Houston, Texas, waiting to be sentenced by the judge. Mr. Skilling was no ordinary criminal. He was wearing a navy blue suit and a tie. Huddled around him were eight lawyers. Outside, television-satellite trucks were parked up and down the block. Skilling was head of the energy firm, Enron, that Fortune magazine had ranked among the “most admired” in the world and valued by the stock market as the seventh-largest corporation in the United States. It had collapsed five years ago, and in May, Skilling had been convicted by a jury for fraud, and almost everything he owned had been turned over to compensate former shareholders.

    “We are here this afternoon,” Judge Simeon Lake began, “for sentencing in United States of America versus Jeffrey K. Skilling, Criminal Case Number H-04-25.” The judge asked Skilling to rise. He then sentenced him to 292 months in prison – twenty-four years, one of the heaviest sentences ever given for a white-collar crime. He would leave prison an old man, if he left prison at all.

    “I only have one request, Your Honor,” said Daniel Petrocelli, Skilling’s lawyer. “If he received ten fewer months, which shouldn’t make a difference in terms of the goals of sentencing, if you do the math and you subtract fifteen percent for good time, he then qualifies under Bureau of Prison policies to serve his time at a lower facility. Just a ten-month reduction in sentence….” It was a plea for leniency. Skilling wasn’t a murderer or a rapist. He was a pillar of the Houston community, and a small adjustment in his sentence would keep him from spending the rest of his life among hardened criminals. Judge Lake thought for a while, then he said “No”.


    Indians are not unfamiliar with Enron. As a result of its involvement in the beleaguered power plant at Dabhol, the words ‘crony capitalism’ entered our vocabulary in the 1990s. Unlike India, persons in high places in the United States serve time in jail. American judges are in the habit of meting out exemplary punishment, as Judge Lake did to Jeffrey Skilling of Enron. Indians would dearly like to substitute in the narrative above any number of names, although Andimuthu Raja, former Minister of Communications is the one that comes to our mind today.

    Wasted rage?

    As things stand in today’s India, we investigate, charges are filed; we even establish guilt; but then years go by, and nothing happens. People lose interest. It would be a real shame if all the valuable rage we have accumulated over weeks in the 2G affair were to go waste. One way to ensure it does not happen is to actually put a few people behind bars this time and do it reasonably quickly. It would go a long way to restore our faith in the system.

    In a recent opinion poll, 83.4 per cent of the people in eight major Indian cities believed that corruption had gone up after liberalisation, which only confirms that people still do not understand that corruption persists in India because reforms are incomplete and scams occur in sectors like mining and real estate, which have not yet been reformed. That it occurred in telecom, an otherwise reformed sector, does come as a surprise. It has happened because the minister created artificial scarcity in the spectrum and gave it away in driblets to those who allegedly bribed him. The scam could have been avoided if the licenses were awarded via open, transparent bidding on the Internet, as in the case of the 3G spectrum.

    The 2G scandal should also remind us about the real corruption of India which does not make the headlines. The ordinary, small and medium entrepreneur still faces on the average 27 inspectors who have the power to close his factory unless he pays a bribe. The most notorious are those in the excise, sales, and the income tax departments. Of course, for every bribe-taker there is a bribe-giver, who is also guilty of wrongdoing. But remember, it is an unequal relationship. The citizen is always vulnerable before a person in authority. The official holds the threat of closing a citizen’s enterprise. A few states have tried to rein in petty officials but mostly they run amok, rapaciously. Hence, many young, honest men and women today shy away from becoming entrepreneurs. The ‘inspector raj’ is one of the reasons that India has failed to create an industrial revolution.

    Beginning of accountability

    Returning to the big picture, it is a matter of some cheer that in recent months ministers have been sacked, serious inquiries have begun, individuals have been arrested. We are also heartened by Nitish Kumar’s huge victory in the Bihar elections, which he claims was the result of good governance. We would like to believe that this is a turning point in our history, the beginning of some sort of accountability in our public life. It is sobering to remember, however, that we said the same thing in 1989 when Rajiv Gandhi’s Congress-led government was defeated after the Bofors gun scandal when the Prime Minister’s family and friends were allegedly involved in bribes and kickbacks.

    We ought to take inspiration from the United States not only because it punishes guilty persons in high places as Judge Lake did in the narrative above, but it enforces its Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (FCPA) vigorously. If any of the telecom licensees in the 2G scam had been American companies—for example, AT&T-- India would have quickly found its smoking gun. Ten years ago, America’s Justice Department was investigating 5 to 10 companies involving foreign bribery at any given time; today, it is 150. Under American inspiration, Britain just passed a new Bribery Act, which is even tougher than the U.S. law. To ensure that companies don’t simply consider FCPA fines as a “cost of doing business,” the U.S. attempts to jail corporate officials, both American and foreign.

    The rage of the Indian public would be redeemed not only by jailing a few people but also by instituting reforms in the system similar to the American FCPA. Only then will some of the taint go away from an honest Prime Minister who seems to be presiding over one of the most corrupt governments in recent Indian history.

    Gurcharan Das is an author and former CEO of Procter & Gamble India.

    http://www.thehindu.com/life-and-style/society/article974218.ece?homepage=true
     
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  3. Vyom

    Vyom Seeker Elite Member

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    My greatest concern for this country is the highly inefficient justice delivery management. No one in the political class has any vision or seem to project any vision for overhauling the judiciary, that is completely crushed by huge logs of pending cases. And not to mention that no one in power is ever convicted.
     
  4. Indianrabbit

    Indianrabbit Regular Member

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    Actually when you give Congress close to complete majority this is what they do. I am really fed up with MMS, he had good numbers in Parliament but he still allowed corruption under his nose.
     
  5. JBH22

    JBH22 Senior Member Senior Member

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    there's a guy called Emmanuel Todd he advocates that with the current system democracy is not sustainable in the foreseeable future note that this guy is a demographer and he predicted the fall of the USSR.

    Btw i think Indians since we lack discipline in all things (punctuality etc) we need someone like Putin who is an authoritarian leader because the ultimate aim is to make a stronger and prosperous country this cannot be done when all states are moving in different directions.Somehow the indian political system is to blame for that a centralised state would be more desirable imo
     
  6. ejazr

    ejazr Stars and Ambassadors Stars and Ambassadors

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    Lack of strong leaders led to parliament paralysis
    IANS

    The relationship between a Congress-led government and the opposition parties in India remains hostage to the belief prevalent among the latter during the first few decades after independence that they were too weak to end the Congress’s virtual monopoly of power, especially at the centre.

    The conviction that they will continue to be in political wilderness bred a sense of helplessness as well as irresponsibility. Coupled with the colonial-era tradition of street violence when the British seemed irreplacable, the opposition parties have been unable to accept the principle of negotiations which is at the root of democratic governance.

    Not only has this attitude persisted even after they have tasted power both at the centre and in the states in the post-1967 period but it has infected the Congress as well to a considerable extent.

    However, the latest parliamentary logjam is probably the worst-ever manifestation of this exercise in negativism. Although the disruption of parliamentary proceedings and rowdyism in state assemblies have become a normal feature of Indian politics, never before has an entire session been stalled by the opposition in support of its demand for a Joint Parliamentary Committee (JPC) probe into the various scams.

    What began as a tactical move by the Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) and the Left parties to corner the government over the scandals in which the Congress and its allies have been implicated has since become a prestige issue with both the contending groups. As a result, none of them is willing to blink first.

    There is little doubt that the senior leaders in both the camps should have tried to avoid the kind of stalemate where even a mid-term poll, at least three years ahead of schedule, is being contemplated. A possible reason for this lamentable failure to break the impasse can perhaps be attributed to the absence of individuals in the two sides who command wide respect even among their opponents and are endowed with skilful persuasive powers.

    To start with the BJP, neither Sushma Swaraj nor Arun Jaitley, the party’s leaders in the Lok Sabha and the Rajya Sabha, has the imprimatur of unquestioned authority. Both have to function under the shadow of L.K. Advani, the BJP’s numero uno at the present time, but even he has lost his earlier aura. Besides, his Somnath-to-Ayodhya rath yatra of 1990 is a reminder of his preference for the politics of confrontation.

    Behind the three is the party president, Nitin Gadkari, who was virtually unknown outside his home state of Maharashtra before his elevation to the present post. The fact that the Rashtriya Swayamsevak Sangh (RSS) facilitated his rise and also prevented Delhi-based politicians like Sushma Swaraj and Jaitley from heading the party does little credit to any one of them.

    As first-timers in a prolonged tussle of this nature with the ruling Congress, it will be unrealistic to expect Sushma Swaraj and Jaitley to have the imagination and confidence to find a way out of the current maze where everyone seems lost. Since their forte is, and has been, rabble-rousing, they can hardly be expected to suddenly display the qualities of mature statesmanship.

    Nor can Gadkari and Advani provide perceptive, conciliatory behind-the-scene guidance. The former has to keep looking over his shoulder to gauge the RSS’ mood while Advani, having been ousted from the party president’s position by the RSS for his favourable comments on Mohammed Ali Jinnah, is lacking in self-belief. This timidity was evident when he allowed Yashwant Sinha and Arun Shourie to formulate the BJP’s policy on the nuclear deal, which ultimately did not benefit the party.

    If the BJP suffers from leadership deficiencies, so does the Congress. Its sole interlocutor has been Pranab Mukherjee, known for his wide political and administrative experience along with an encyclopaedic knowledge of government and parliamentary functioning.

    But his record as a negotiator is less than bright. His prolonged talks with Prakash Karat and Co on the nuclear deal were fruitless, as the Left’s withdrawal of support from the government in 2008 showed. His interactions with Mamata Banerjee have done little to curb the Trinamool Congress leader’s unpredictable political forays in West Bengal, so much so that it is still uncertain whether the Congress-Trinamool alliance will last till the assembly polls next year.

    Mukherjee may have received a comprehensive brief from Congress president Sonia Gandhi and Prime Minister Manmohan Singh. But he cannot be expected to take a major on-the-spur initiative.

    Even then, the Congress can be said to have placed at least two new proposals on the table. One is the prime minister’s offer to appear before the Public Accounts Committee (PAC) headed by the BJP’s Murli Manohar Joshi and the other is Mukherjee’s suggestion of a special parliamentary session to debate the corruption scandals.

    Incidentally, both Joshi and Shourie are against a JPC probe because earlier investigations by such committees have not been noticeably successful. Unlike the Congress, however, the BJP and the Left have made no new proposals. Instead, they have obstinately stuck to their demand for a JPC.

    Unfortunately, such mulishness cannot but foster disrespect for parliamentary democracy, especially if the BJP keeps its vow of disrupting the budget session as well. However, the possibility of the Left parting company with the saffron brigade is a good sign. The Samajwadi Party, too, is apparently having second thoughts about continuing to block parliament. However, these cracks in the opposition ranks are likely to persuade the Congress to become more stubborn in its rejection of the JPC demand.

    Irrespective of how this sorry episode pans out, both the Congress and the BJP have harmed themselves by exposing the absence in their parties of broadminded leaders with a spirit of accommodation, who can rise above partisan considerations to preserve the sanctity of noble institutions like parliament.

    (25-12-2010- Amulya Ganguli is a political analyst. He can be reached at [email protected])
     
  7. Yusuf

    Yusuf GUARDIAN Administrator

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    Yeah we could be like china and then have our families in jail for dessent. Not have this kind of freedom and we too could be 50 cents people on the net.
    Or be like stalinist russia and spy on out brothers and have them handed over to secret police if there is any dispute.
    Strong centralized dictatorial regime is not the answer. Better ethics is. Look at the western democracy for answers and role model rather than repressive regimes.
     
  8. bhogta

    bhogta Regular Member

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    Indian can't survive with out democracy. With different race, language and religion. It the only solution we should stick. In time eduction and good economy will bring people together. We should just need to vote in good number thats all.
     
  9. gogbot

    gogbot Regular Member

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    India's withstood far worse , with far less.
    I would like to remember everyone that the country's future as a democracy was to collapse 10 years after independence. predicted by all the speculators of the day.
    If anything i would think that our political process produces very strong leaders , because one has to survive Indian politics for many years before they get a chance.

    right now
    this is just the felling that our issues are the more important one's.

    whether it be UPA or NDA the one that smells less foul is the one to go with.
     
  10. Phenom

    Phenom Regular Member

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    Corruption is hardly new in India. There are two main difference now, one is the rise of independent media to highlight corruption and second as the economy develops the scale of corruption also increase, so instead of hearing about 50 Cr scams we are hearing about 1 Lakh Crore scams.

    With more media scrutiny politicians will realize that being corrupt hurts their chances of getting re-elected and hopefully the level of corruption will go down.
     
  11. hit&run

    hit&run Elite Member Elite Member

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    I remember a dialog by an actor playing W.G.Bush In Harold and Kumar escape from Guantanamo bay movie. ''Trust the government? Heck, I'm in the government and I don't even trust it. You don't have to believe in your government to be a good American. You just have to believe in your country''.
    Indians becoming judgmental on Pakistani kind of assumptions about India are reacting very badly. There should be a need for all of us to have a distinction between India and Indian government/politics/party agendas. I have personally seen politicians pissing in their pants when agencies do catch them up. I have known politicians tearing off Constitution of India in past now in main stream politics, saluting the flag as sworn in ministers by the grace of same constitution. I have seen India curbing and winning insurgencies/naxalism, famine, terrorism, wars etc.

    I believe in our forces as an entity who guards our integrity and founding principles without the being effected by politics of different parties. I know their presence only is enough for those who rule this country to say when its enough.

    But today, the Indians (our forefathers) who fought for the struggle of Independence in millions and millions of numbers, so organised that they were able to win us a nations from Imperial forces are tagged by few, as elites and uneducated.

    India is not about how many riots we have, India is not about how corrupt we are, but an evolution we must trust in that we are going to be a great nation who believe in our founding principles like democracy, secularism and opportunity for all. By saying so i am not denying that we do not have fault line, but we should explore those fault lines not in the systems and principles but within ourselves. The politician or a policeman is one of us who is interpreting the system the way he wants. Every dog has its day but not all days.

    We have inherited a long history, for few the history is explained differently and for other may be differently. But my history was written by those who fought the war of Independence and got me the Independence on 15 August 1947. I will continue from it by believing in those founding principles forever. In last 60 years we have achieved so much that now we are able to see the light from other end of the tunnel. It happened not because of any political party but we all. We have to continue with it. India isn't going anywhere, the democracy is going to stay.

    I am aware that many may disagree with me for sake of nitpicking but what i am trying to say is that nitpicking is not going to lead us anywhere. May be one will win the argument by very cunning technicalities and due to hyper knowledge about the subject in hand. But my prayer is that we must promise our self that we are not going to distrust our founding principles. We can not come back to square one again and again. Let us try to give immunity to our founding principles and discuss something else. Even an achievement in a vacuum without these principles will be tasteless and ordinary.
     
    Last edited: Dec 26, 2010
  12. hit&run

    hit&run Elite Member Elite Member

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    Even outsiders know better then us.

     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 10, 2015
  13. warriorextreme

    warriorextreme Senior Member Senior Member

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    just watched rangde basanti on DD national ;(
    nothing has changed..
    nothing will change until budhaus are ruling this nation
     
  14. Yusuf

    Yusuf GUARDIAN Administrator

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    Budhau or not, work ethics, moral ethics all that has to change. The young lot, at least in Karnataka is as corrupt as the earlier lot. Problem is that most of the lot join politics to save themselves from criminal proceedings and make a killing with plum ministries.
    I am a realist and i know that corruption cannot be eliminated. But corruption to the level that no work is done, no benefit to the nation and only the coffers of the politicians filling up is something thats not good. I am one who thinks let the politician take his cut but get the freaking job done.
    I have seen infra projects being "completed" with full certification with nothing at all there on the ground!!! That is criminal. Everything eaten away. But i would not mind a case where a minister takes 10% or whatever but at least the job is done. Infra is built and we as a nation move forward. Similarly in all other fields.
     
  15. warriorextreme

    warriorextreme Senior Member Senior Member

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    i also feel the same...i know that developed countries are not corruption free but atleast their politicians have some shame..take bribe but atleast complete the freaking project on time god damn it..
    This wont change until we start protesting...we can gather and protest infront of loksabha or for start even infront of local governing body..

    i saw how students protested in UK against fee increase..that is what you call a youth protest...here youth protest is also influenced by political parties :angry_7:
     
  16. Vyom

    Vyom Seeker Elite Member

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    You should certainly mind that and so should everyone else. It is this 10% that slowly accumulated in the minds of the politicians of India, just after independence, that gave rise to the monster of corruption that we now see.

    You can compare corruption to a sack of sand that you have to hold extremely tight and then be hopeful that only a few will escape the sack of "law". If you don't hold it tight enough, you will allow continuous and persistent escape of corruption from law, making the hole in the sack bigger and bigger.
     
  17. ejazr

    ejazr Stars and Ambassadors Stars and Ambassadors

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    Well we all focus on ministers and political parties when it comes to corruption. What about the police, civil administration and courts? Its an open secret that there is corruption infestation there as well. The corruption in the civil services is particularly disheartening. While the politicians keep getting the brunt as they should. We tend to forget the babus who get their own cut as well and do their job diligently in keeping the nation backward.
     
  18. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    True, everyone is nude in the Haman!

    The politicians get it more since they pretend to be oh so Holy and that they are in politics just to save the country!

    A politician like Mallya would not get criticised since he flaunts his wealth and makes no bones of having a Good Time.

    On the other hand, Mayawati is sure to raise eyebrows when her wealth skyrockets in a short span of time!
     
    Last edited: Dec 27, 2010
  19. Yusuf

    Yusuf GUARDIAN Administrator

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    Work gets done with a commission. Here entire money is eaten away and no work happens. Do you think there is no corruption or commission in the west? They use a civilized term called "Lobbying" for it. Difference there and here is that after that work is done. Their nation progresses..Here its not the case.
     
  20. The Messiah

    The Messiah Bow Before Me! Elite Member

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    get some facts right before you post. firstly it is the politicians themselves who appoint judges and secondly do you know how many judges are in India compared to population ?

    there are around 30 judges in delhi while population is 15 crore.....hire thousand more judges. one person can only do so much....he cant write 100 judgements everyday and even if he could there would still be a backlog because more cases get filed.
     
    Last edited: Dec 29, 2010
  21. Vyom

    Vyom Seeker Elite Member

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    That is exactly what I meant when I said "justice delivery system". I am not blaming the inefficiency of judges, I am pointing to the inefficiencies of the system.
     

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