Decommissioning PLAAP soldiers say farewell to their K9 fellows

Discussion in 'China' started by DaTang, Nov 16, 2012.

  1. DaTang

    DaTang Tihar Jail Banned

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    [​IMG]
    last training
    [​IMG]
    Tough to say good bye to a dear fellow soldier
    [​IMG]
    check on paws for the last time, K9 officers hurt their paws easily in intense sorties.
    [​IMG]
    Good bye my friend, here is something as a souvenir for you.
     
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  3. Singh

    Singh Phat Cat Administrator

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    Are they going to eat them now ? :troll:

    Sorry couldn't resist.
     
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  4. DaTang

    DaTang Tihar Jail Banned

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    Canineballism is mainly if not only spotted in Guangdong province and Jilin province. Some guangdong people believe dogs have herbal medicine effects on their body,they eat dogs in winter to keep vigor. as I said before, Guangdong used to be the least developed province in China, as late as in Tang dynasty(700-1000BC), expelled criminals and unfavored officials were all sent to there as punishment, some customs from ancient Yue(or Vie) people were conserved there and become part of local culture.
    Jilin province started to eat dogs only from the late 19 century and early 20 century, because, Japanese force moved many Koreans (then Japanese territory) into Northeast China to form colonies, Korean custom was brought in and these Korean stayed and became Chinese Korean, great people though, my favorite rock star, Cuijian is an ethnic korean.

    This being said, dogs meat sold in restaurants are mainly farm raised like cattle, some cheap ones used stray dogs and already caused trouble in food security and public health. Less and less people are eating dog meat there now, but there are always loyal gourmets cannot survive with it. I suggest you import some of them to India and your stray dog problem will be solved in a Chinese speed, they don't care about sanity anyways.
     
    Last edited: Nov 16, 2012
  5. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    Nothing wrong with the Chinese eating dogs, insects, maggots, frogs, cockroaches, you name the 'exotic' and you find a Chinese devouring it with utter delight!

    If they find it palatable and nutritious, so be it.

    The Chinese eat more 'exotic' food than dogs. These items would not be relished elsewhere and some may feel that they are repugnant.

    But then, it is the Chinese' choice of what they eat.

    Da Nang's post indicates what I have been saying all through and the Chinese have denied it that Yues and others were treated as barbarians.

    95% of China are Han. Yue people are also taken as Han.

    We have ad nauseum discussed the diversity of China which because of political and historical reasons are clubbed as Han.

    I just hope the dogs which has served China well do not find themselves on the table as a delicacy.

    Can't blame Koreans for the dog being an item as a table d'hôte.

    Can we blame China for all the war and bloodshed just because China invented gunpowder?
     
    Last edited: Nov 16, 2012
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  6. DaTang

    DaTang Tihar Jail Banned

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    Yep, I don't see anything wrong for them to keep the culture either,
    there is no Yue people, Yue people is a term in history. I am against them selling dog meat without being inspected by Health Department, some of them are stray dogs, who knows what is in it.

    Han don't treat ethnic minority as barbarian, han treats barbarian as barbarian.
     
  7. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    Yues are not ethnic minority as per the Chinese.

    You are new here and so here is something from Olsen's Ethnocultural History of China

    This maybe from Wiki, but check the references!
     
  8. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    Also read up about the 'barbarian' Baiyue people who had tattooed bodies and so on and what the Han felt about them. ;)
     
  9. DaTang

    DaTang Tihar Jail Banned

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    Those bai yue people vaished into Chinese, why it is so hard for you to understand?
     
  10. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    So the Chinese are magicians?

    The Uighurs and the Tibetans will also vanish!

    You reinforce my point that other Chinese disagree that the Han 'assimilated' non Hans through various means and made them accept the Han culture and call themselves as Han.

    Some of the methods so adopted by the Hans can be observed in the manner the Han treat the Uighurs and Tibetans and force them into adopting the Han language, customs, culture etc and erase all connection to their singular historical identity.
     
    Last edited: Nov 17, 2012
  11. DaTang

    DaTang Tihar Jail Banned

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    Call us cultural magicians if you will, melting pots if you are into western terminology.
    Bai stands for one hundred, Yue stands for various Yue tribes, because "hundred" is used as a way to say many, just like in english, hundreds and thousands.

    With war, marriage, trade, cultural exchanges, tribes merged into more advanced civilization, this is how human being evolved.
     
    Last edited: Nov 17, 2012
  12. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    How pathetic can you get?

    Wars, marriage, cultural exchanges, tribes have been a part of all countries be it the West or the Orient.

    They all identify with an overall nationality, but they have not been assimilated or made one monolithic whole as in China where 95% are called Han when they are not, wiping away their roots in all aspects.

    In India, we are Indians but we are also separate identities based on culture etc.

    So is the case in the US or UK or even France, Germany, Italy, in Africa and Latin America and what have you.

    In China the separate identities have been washed out and obliterated. You also mention so about the Yues.

    And you also force the issue that all Chinese are one racial entity, completely disregarding history, culture and assimilation that was forced on them.

    What makes you feel that Han is an 'advanced' civilisation?

    That is unmitigated poppycock!

    Give us a break!
     
    Last edited: Nov 17, 2012
  13. DaTang

    DaTang Tihar Jail Banned

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    How desperate can you get?

    hahah
    you put too much biased personal feelings in debate, unlike you what you said, we were NOT alienated or obliterated or washed out.
    we were merged in by keeping and sacrificing our cultural traits. Chinese culture is from the very beginning very dynamic. it only grows after it changes, sometimes the changes happened in a big scale, sometimes smaller scale, sometimes active, sometimes passive, but Chinese culture involved and progressed by successufully keeping a comformity.

    There never been a static Chinese or Han Culture, and there will never be one.

    In the 3 century BC, there is a kingdom located in modern day China's shanxi and hebei province, their army only fought wars with charriots but no cavalry, and it was a taboo to learn from the always agressively invading Huns, but they did, they learned the strategic and tactic of Hun Cavalry and defended their kingdom well, by the time of 1 Century BC, the South part of the Huns merged into Han Dynasty ( we got our ethnic title from this dynasty) and Huns eventually became Han, some of them even inherit the Royal family name, Liu, In Shanxi, there is still a lot lLius nowadays whose ancestors can be traced back to Hun era.

    Jin Midi, this Hun prince even drive charriots for Han Wu Emperor and become his knight and son.

    [​IMG]

    I understand your mentaility, for the recent 800 years, the subcontinent actually were raped by many other outside invaders, indian culture failed to annex them into its own but tragically lost your own identity to different conquorors. Your culture never got successfully grown up and it has been submissive for so long, You just see things from an opposit angle. I give up this struggle since you are talking without logic but full of subjective believes.
     
    Last edited: Nov 17, 2012
  14. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    Vague meanderings to obfuscate won't do.

    The issue is simple.

    How come that 95% of people in China are Han, when the Han was actually confined to an area north of Yellow River and then they commenced conquering the new areas and assimilating the people and forcing the Han culture and making them Han.

    All nations of the world have undergone all what Han China has experienced conquests and so on.

    However, while all Nations have their unique identity, but they are not one monolith entity of people and instead are different peoples who have united to be a single nation state.

    How is it that China is different.

    What is all this poppycock about cultural flexibility? All cultures are flexible.

    What is so unique about Han culture that has not faced the issues of all other cultures of the world?

    Actually the Manuchus and the Khanate raped and pillaged the Han.

    The Indian culture assimilated all the different influences of the people who came and went.
     
  15. DaTang

    DaTang Tihar Jail Banned

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    We have a saying in China, you don't play harp to ox or A summer bug won't understand what winter is.

    As I tried many times, my logic and knowledge just won't cross the border of your hard shell brain. so I better give up before it gets lengthy and unproductive.

    You know nothing about China and Chinese history, the very statements are wrong to the core, Han as a Dynasty's name is generated from founder of Han Dynasty Liu Bang's fedral, Hanzhong, which is to the west of China, and Liu Bang himself is a native of Jiangsu, to the south east of China,

    Before Han Dynasty , there is no Han ethnic, how come you claim Hans are from north China? Han was founded in 2 century BC, Confucius lived in 6-5 century BC.
    and Han is not the first unified China, Qin ( Chin, some say China got the name from this dynasty which is questionable) already founded a nation covers a territory south to the nothern part of current Vietnam in 210 BC.
    see Map
    [​IMG]

    I recall you are the one who taught me Chinese tones I have to gave up my fruitless argue with somebody who has such a faith in his self-correctness.

    So please drop your ignorance and learn. I hate educating stubborn people.
     
    Last edited: Nov 17, 2012
  16. venkat

    venkat Regular Member

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    I was told never to crawl on all four while in China!!! you will be mistaken for a new species and eaten alive either raw or roasted!!!:shocked:
     
  17. DaTang

    DaTang Tihar Jail Banned

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    nah, your meat is too tough to chew, are they don't like curry flavor, kidding, my bad.
     
  18. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    It does appear that it might appear that my posts are casting pearls before swine, in the sense of an English metaphor.

    But then life here is somewhat like that with propaganda being churned out as facts by some who are in a state of denial and in megalomaniac inventions.

    Logic and knowledge?

    Good one that!

    I daresay, woolly woolly tripe or snake oil anecdotes will even penetrate the softest of craniums.

    On your giving up, it would not be incorrect to believe that you normally give up when your figments of imagination is repudiated by scholarly tomes with links. Contrived ideas and propaganda fashioned by conditioned minds cannot stand the power of truth and facts. That is the Gospel of existence.

    Let us have a look at China.

    It is true that I do not know the Chinese history reinvented by the Communist and fashioned into conditioned minds of the Chinese. And anyway, Chinese history is of myths, half truths and sheer fairy tales that massages the Han cultural arrogance of being the centre of the world and the ideal civilisation!

    To with the magnum opus of Sima Qian, the Grand Historian of China is attributed to the belief that the author critically used stories passed on from antiquity as part of his sources. Therefore, they are myths and stories that the Chinese believe as the Gospel to suit their convenience. The authenticity of fact passed on as history by word of mouth and then compiled cannot be guaranteed as real events.

    The Han Dynasty was the successor of the Qin Dynasty. The Qin State was so structured so as to be a defensive buffer against nomadic armies of the Rong, Qiang, and Di peoples.

    In 2 CE, this was the Han areas

    [​IMG]

    Now has a close look before you take off like a Scud missile. Is that what China is today?

    Chinese history is one of territorial expansion, imperial pursuits and colonialisation of non Chinese people. It is a historical fact that even Sima Qian, the Grand Historian of China has noted. Hence, your flippant comments of Chinese history are rendered bogus.

    Likewise the China Govt’s statistics that 93% of the people living in China are Han! Apart from the above mentioned facts, it is the usual Chinese propaganda that all Chinese are Han since such a large mass cannot have one type of people inhabiting the land mass. China is no exception, but it suited the Chinese Han and followed by the successor regimes to mould the conquered people into one homogenous mass, through various means including cultural, linguistic and custom ‘genocide’, so that their originality was wiped out and any secessionist tendency or asserting themselves were lost to posterity.

    This type of ‘genocide’ is being practiced even now in Tibet and Xinjaing. The attempt to vilify the Dalai Lama is but to destroy the rallying focal point of Tibetan identity and embracing the amorphous, ubiquitous Han identity so as to ensure that the desire for seeking one’s own identity is destroyed forever.

    Take this example of what they are doing even now in Tibet and Xinjiang.

    The Han did the same to the Xiongnu people from the steppes who raided Chinese territory causing enormous instability in frontier regions. Lest you forget, the founder of the Han dynasty had lost his army, his throne, and his life under the Xiongnu siege.

    The Han emperors were initially forced to acknowledge the rival Xiongnu Chanyus as their equals, yet in reality the Han was an inferior partner in a tributary and royal marriage alliance known as heqin. This agreement was broken when Emperor Wu of Han (r. 141–87 BCE) launched a series of military campaigns which eventually caused the fissure of the Xiongnu Federation and redefined the borders of China. The Han realm was expanded into the Hexi Corridor of modern Gansu province, theTarim Basin of modern Xinjiang, modern Yunnan and Hainan, modern northern Vietnam, modern North Korea, and southern Outer Mongolia

    Now, is that not expansionist, imperialistic and colonialistic and why blame the Qin?

    You write of Liu Bang. He was a minor official in the Qin Dynasty.

    He declared, "At last the whole world is mine," as he claimed the imperial throne in 202 B.C., the first of 27 Lius to reign. What was his world beyond what he had?

    Here is a quote of this so called chap who spread beyond his little area under him to whole of China:


    So, take it for what it is worth.

    The history of the Han is not so easy so simplistic.

    China's first imperial dynasty was the Qin Dynasty (221–206 BC). The Qin unified the Chinese Warring States by conquest, but their empire became unstable after the death of the first emperor Qin Shi Huangdi. Within four years, the dynasty's authority had collapsed in the face of rebellion. Two former rebel leaders, Xiang Yu (d. 202 BC) of Chu and Liu Bang (d. 195 BC) of Han, engaged in a war to decide who would become hegemon of China, which had fissured into 18 kingdoms, each claiming allegiance to either Xiang Yu or Liu Bang. Although Xiang Yu proved to be a capable commander, Liu Bang defeated him at the Battle of Gaixia, in modern-day Anhui. Liu Bang assumed the title "emperor" (huangdi) at the urging of his followers and is known posthumously as Emperor Gaozu (r. 202–195 BC). Chang'an was chosen as the new capital of the reunified empire under Han.

    Xiang Wu was from the royal family of Chu.

    Now, who are the Chu?

    Han?

    They were called Man and called themselves Man, a word that scholars have tried to link with the Miao-Yao speakers of today. Miao and Yao are Han?

    Historically, the term "Miao" had been applied inconsistently to a variety of non-Han peoples.

    By the late Warring States period, they were already speaking a Sinitic language. The question is did they adopt it or was it their original speech? The Central Plains people considered them as non-"Chinese" and called them Man. These people never got on the "Chinese" bandwagon till they were forced!

    Check DEFINING CHU: IMAGE AND REALITY IN ANCIENT CHINA. Edited by Constance A. Cook and John S. Major. Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press, 1999.

    This edited volume is the first Western language book-length study to focus on a single ancient Chinese state. Tracing the evolution of Chu from a vassal state in the Spring and Autumn period (770-476 B.C.E.), through its rise and fall as a leading political power in the Warring States (475-221 B.C.E.), to its subsequent resurgence in the early Han (206 B.C.E.-8 C.E.), Defining Chu addresses the historical geography, archaeological history, artistic achievements, and socio-political characteristics of Chu.

    The authors in turn attempt to separate the mythologized Chu, revolving principally around the image of Chu as an alternative, slightly barbarous (shamanic) culture, from a "historically real" Chu especially evident in recent archaeological discoveries.

    That much for China being one homogenous Han people!

    If one takes each barbarian peoples of early China today being passed off as Han, then the reality will be so evident that they aren’t and which you Chinese want to hide.

    Those researching Chinese religion will find John S. Major's article on later Chu religion especially worthy of attention. Here Major discusses issues of regionalism, spatial orientation and religious cosmography, monsters and gods, snakes and animal motifs, hunting motifs, shamanism and spirit-possession, "farflight" or spirit journeys, Huang-Lao Daoism and Chu influence on Han culture, and four specific cases of Chu cultural influence (cosmographs, calendars, mirrors, and the mother goddess). With so much academic conjecture centering on the connection between the state of Chu (China's "shamanic substratum") and Warring States "Daoism," specifically the possible Chu origins of classical Daoism, one would have appreciated greater attention to this issue, either in some of the volume's contributions or as a separate article. The book also lacks a glossary of Chinese characters. Defining Chu is for scholars of early China, especially those focusing on the Warring States period, as well as for anyone thinking through issues of mythologization (essentialist definitions of culture based on a constructed past). Recommended for research libraries and historians of early China.


    [​IMG]

    The Han Empire was divided into areas directly controlled by the central government, known as commanderies, and a number of semi-autonomous kingdoms. These kingdoms gradually lost all vestiges of their independence, particularly following theRebellion of the Seven States.



    I recall you are the one who taught me Chinese tones I have to gave up my fruitless argue with somebody who has such a faith in his self-correctness.

    So please drop your ignorance and learn. I hate educating stubborn people.[/QUOTE]

    I did not teach you of Chinese tonal differential.

    It is a fact that you wish to deny given your conditioned mindset.

    Do you disbelief the links I appended?

    See this Youtube



    Here it is again for the Chinese character ‘Ma’

    Note the tones and the different meanings of the same character, ‘Ma’


    Pinyin Chinese Character Meaning Sound Clip
    mā 媽 mother audio
    má 麻 hemp audio
    mǎ 馬 horse audio
    mà 罵 scold audio
    http://mandarin.about.com/od/pronunciation/a/tones.htm

    Mandarin Chinese has four pitched tones and a "toneless" tone. The reason for having these tones is probably that the Chinese language has very few possible syllables -- approximately 400 -- while English has about 12,000. For this reason, there may be more homophonic words , words with the same sound expressing different meanings, in Chinese than in most other languages. Apparently tones help the relatively small number of syllables to multiply and thereby alleviate but not completely solve the problem. Learning Chinese in context, therefore, is very important.

    Now you can understand how the Chinese use only one syllable "da" and yet can tell the difference between" to hang over something" ( da1 ), "to answer" (da2), "to hit" (da3), and "big" (da4). Yes, the secret lies in the tones.

    The tone of a syllable may change in some situations. For example, these are the characters for "mother" (妈妈). As separate characters each is pronounced as "ma," but when put together, the second "ma" becomes toneless: . Rules like this are, however, very few and very easy to remember.

    This is how you express chinese tone:

    1st tone: HIGH LEVEL TONE
    2nd tone: HIGH RISING TONE
    3rd tone: LOW FALLING RISING TONE
    4th tone: HIGH FALLING TONE

    :)

    It is unfortunate that either you are unlettered or simply a blind jingo or a Chinese paid propagandist attempting follow the Communist line to fool all and come out smelling of roses as civilised and modern and in one step ahead of the rest of the world!
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 10, 2015
  19. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    Good man, you may now please deconstruct the Youtube on the tones and the words have same character, but different meanings.
     
  20. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    Like others have told you, you might be confused a little bit. First of all, while languages have words made of syllables, Chinese has characters where each character is a syllable. These syllables can be written using the Latin alphabet with some systems, Pinyin being the most common one. Syllables can have 5 different tones: high, rising, fall-rising, falling and neutral.

    According to the syllable and the tone attached to it, you can have a different meaning (excluding the fact that many characters cannot stand alone).

    If you write "mā", it doesn't necessarily mean "mother", since that Pinyin transcription can refer to different characters. For example, the characters below are all read as mā:

    [​IMG]

    The one on the left-center is the Traditional form for 妈, which means "ma, mamma".

    Not only that, the same character can have different readings, which means different meanings. But also in the same reading, we have different meanings! See the character 着 for example:

    [​IMG]

    As you see, 着 has 5 different readings, but much more meanings, even for one single reading. I know this might scare you from learning Chinese, but once you start, you'll get used to it.

    tones - How extensible is the tonal quality rule? - Chinese Language and Usage Beta - Stack Exchange

    *************

    Now, go on and start your gobgassing and the legend of fibs!

    Stop trying to make the impossible possible even if you have a conditioned outlook.

    Do you really know the Chinese history or the Chinese language and its tonal difference?

    Are you sure you are a Chinese or are you a wannabe?

    A Hakka, which I believe means 'Guest'.

    This is what I learn of the Hakka term:

    The Chinese characters for Hakka (客家) literally means "guest families".
     
    Last edited: Nov 19, 2012
  21. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    Let me not append the link where eating human babies is par for the Chinese.
     

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