Decoding temple destruction denial

Discussion in 'Military History' started by Simple_Guy, Dec 8, 2014.

  1. Simple_Guy

    Simple_Guy Regular Member

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    Art and political history through stones and temples - The Hindu

    [​IMG]

    The broad area that this book captures is the Deccan with its monumental architecture — specially the fiercely contested sites of Kalyana, the one-time capital of the Chalukyas; Raichur (another area of struggle between Vijayanagara and the Bahmani sultanate); and Warangal, the power base of the Kakatiyas. From the 10th to the 14th century (continuing to the seventeenth) the desperate struggle between political power and architecture as the visible and palpable expression of the cultural life of the people, becomes especially intense. Temples are chronicles of a narrative of this interaction of power and memory.

    As they argue, historians have often tended to neglect the Deccan during the 1300-1600, and this book proffers different perspectives from the usual ones toward a better understanding of how regional politics operated at the ground level.

    While earlier with the expansion of Delhi Sultanate into the Deccan, a fusion of temples and mosques came into prominence[​IMG], during the 16 century, by contrast, a deliberate revival of earlier times and cultures were infused. As art historians have always emphasised, Chalukya architecture was to be seen as a distinct taxonomic entity, and the 16 century patrons actively sought them out for recycling in their royal projects. Both the variant versions of Chalukya architecture — the Dharwar and the Bijapur styles — were reintegrated into the nascent emergent style apparently infused with a political motive deliberately in the Vijayanagara to invoke a continuity with the past. In a similar manner to the north the Sultanate of Bijapur (1490-1686) whose sovereign territory covered much of the Chalukya’s former territory, displayed its own awareness and interest in the past.

    The battle of Talikota spelt catastrophe for Vijayanagara while for Bijapur it was a physical and ideological transformation, and its Sultan Adil Shah used the plundered wealth to upgrade Bijapur from a mere provincial outpost to a major Indo-Persian capital. Architectural narratives reveal this process of fusion, transformation, and reintegration. It is not unusual for scholars of history to refer to the plunder and pillage of Hindu temples by Muslim invaders. But as this book attempts to reread in the remains of Deccan’s architectural monuments, desecration and destruction were not the sole process but a deliberate cultivation of aesthetic and architectural history integrated with memory of place also was in the scheme of things.[​IMG]
     
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  3. Simple_Guy

    Simple_Guy Regular Member

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    In his book 'Essays on Islam and Indian History' Richard Eaton makes the fanciful claim that "only" 80 temples were destroyed by foreign invaders in India.

    Chalo bhai, at least the moron admits that temples were destroyed!

    Can anyone decode: "desecration and destruction were not the sole process but a deliberate cultivation of aesthetic and architectural history integrated with memory of place also was in the scheme of things."
     
  4. Simple_Guy

    Simple_Guy Regular Member

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    Richard Eaton started out in the Peace Corps, which was created at end of World War II by the American government. Young Americans would travel to developing countries and serve as "missionaries of democracy." This organization has been steeped in controversies, like attempting to convert poor people, espionage, insurgencies, rapes and sexual abuse.
     
  5. Kshatriya87

    Kshatriya87 Senior Member Senior Member

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    No secret. I prefer to call it as cultural cleansing. Fortunately for the previous and later hindu kings, the existing temples were protected and many others which were destroyed were rebuilt.
     
    Srinivas_K likes this.

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