Dalai Lama: My Reincarnation Will Appear In Free Country

Discussion in 'West Asia & Africa' started by ajtr, Jul 26, 2010.

  1. ajtr

    ajtr Veteran Member Veteran Member

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    Dalai Lama: My Reincarnation Will Appear In Free Country

    By P. Vijian

    DHARAMSALA, July 20 (Bernama) -- Exiled Tibetan spiritual leader Dalai Lama believes his next reincarnation will be in a "free country", if the Tibetan crisis prolongs without a cordial solution.

    "If I die as a refugee and the Tibetan situation remains like this, then logically, my reincarnation will appear in a free country, because the very purpose of reincarnation is to carry on the work which began in my previous life.

    "And, there is some contribution, some fulfillment in work started in the previous life. Then, that is truly reincarnation," he told Bernama in a recent interview at his exile-base in Dharamsala in northern India.

    He said, if obstacles were created against carrying out the tasks of the Dalai Lama's previous life, than the "reality is not reincarnation."

    The 75-year-old senior monk, named Tenzin Gyatso, now the 14th Dalai Lama, is recognised as the reincarnation of Tibet's 13th spiritual leader Thubten Gyatso.

    The Nobel Peace laureate said, despite insurmountable odds, largely the political pressure from the Chinese Government for a free Tibet, he would continue his campaign for the thousands of Tibetan people displaced from their native land for almost five decades.

    "My daily prayer is, so long as space remains and so long as the sufferings of sentient beings are there, I will remain in order to serve, that is my most effective inspiration," he said.

    Asked whether a female could possibly head the male-dominated Tibetan Buddhist hierarchy in the future, he said women were always held in high esteem in Buddhism, without prejudice.

    "Female Dalai Lama (is) possible because in Tibet tradition, among the high women, reincarnation is there, I think there is the 700-800-year-old Dorjee Phagmo institution which is for female reincarnation...so, there is no religious connotation that religious leader must be male.

    "If circumstances are such that female reincarnation is more effective to people, then, logically it should be female,"
    he said.

    Queried if he would one day take the form of a woman reincarnation, he replied: "I personally don't know."

    The Tibetan movement in exile is seeking genuine autonomy from Beijing, with the Dalai Lama pushing the "middle way approach" -- a moderate agenda for a peaceful co-existence with China -- so, ancient Tibetan language, culture and Buddhism remain in tact.
     
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  3. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    No matter which free country the reincarnation occurs, the next Dalai Lama will be termed as a plant by the Chinese Communist govt.
     
  4. amoy

    amoy Senior Member Senior Member

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    When HH DL was in India hesitating whether to stay (far earlier than his later exile), Zhou Enlai sent a message to him to the effect "You're Buddha, and Tibet is your 'Temple'".

    China’s Money and Migrants Pour Into Tibet
    Adrian Bradshaw/European Pressphoto Agency
    http://www.nytimes.com/2010/07/25/w...wanted=2&_r=1&sq=tibet immigrant&st=cse&scp=1

    By EDWARD WONG
    LHASA, Tibet — They come by new high-altitude trains, four a day, cruising 1,200 miles past snow-capped mountains. And they come by military truck convoy, lumbering across the roof of the world.
    The New York Times

    China’s government invested $3 billion in Tibet last year.
    Han Chinese workers, investors, merchants, teachers and soldiers are pouring into remote Tibet. After the violence that ravaged this region in 2008, China’s aim is to make Tibet wealthier — and more Chinese.

    Chinese leaders see development, along with an enhanced security presence, as the key to pacifying the Buddhist region. The central government invested $3 billion in the Tibet Autonomous Region last year, a 31 percent increase over 2008. Tibet’s gross domestic product is growing at a 12 percent annual rate, faster than the robust Chinese national average.

    Simple restaurants located in white prefabricated houses and run by ethnic Han businesspeople who take the train have sprung up even at a remote lake north of Lhasa. About 1.2 million rural Tibetans, nearly 40 percent of the region’s population, have been moved into new residences under a “comfortable housing” program. And officials promise to increase tourism fourfold by 2020, to 20 million visitors a year.

    But if the influx of money and people has brought new prosperity, it has also deepened the resentment among many Tibetans. Migrant Han entrepreneurs elbow out Tibetan rivals, then return home for the winter after reaping profits. Large Han-owned companies dominate the main industries, from mining to construction to tourism.

    “Why did I come here? To make money, of course!” said Xiong Zhahua, a migrant from Sichuan Province who spends five months a year running a restaurant on the shores of chilly Nam Tso, the lake north of Lhasa.

    A rare five-day official tour of Tibet, though carefully managed by the Chinese Foreign Ministry, provided a glimpse of life in the region during a period of tight political and military control.

    Tibet is more stable after security forces quelled the worst uprising against Chinese rule in five decades. But the increased ethnic Han presence — and the uneven benefits of Han-led investment — have kept the region on edge.

    Some Chinese officials acknowledge the disenfranchisement of Tibetans, though they defend the right of Han to migrate here.

    “The flow of human resources follows the rule of market economics and is also indispensable for the development of Tibet,” Hao Peng, vice chairman and deputy party secretary of the region, said at a news conference with a small group of foreign journalists. But the current system “may have caused an imbalanced distribution,” he said. “We are taking measures to solve this problem.”

    The government bars foreign reporters from traveling independently in Tibet. Journalists on the tour were brought to several development projects by ministry officials, but were occasionally able to interview locals on their own. Tibetans interviewed independently expressed fear of the security forces and spoke on the condition of anonymity.

    One high school student complained that Tibetans could not compete for jobs with Han migrants who arrived with high school diplomas. “Tibetans just get low-end jobs,” he said.

    Chinese officials say Tibetans make up more than 95 percent of the region’s 2.9 million people, but refuse to give estimates on Han migrants, who are not registered residents. In the cities of Lhasa and Shigatse, it is clear that Han neighborhoods are dwarfing Tibetan areas.

    Resentment of the Han exploded during the March 2008 rioting — Tibetans in Lhasa burned and looted hundreds of Han and ethnic Hui shops; at least 19 people died, most of them Han civilians,
    the Chinese government said. Han security forces then cracked down on Tibetans across the plateau.

    Robert Barnett, a scholar of Tibet at Columbia University, said the goal of maintaining double-digit growth in the region had worsened ethnic tensions.

    “Of course, they achieved that, but it was disastrous,” he said. “They had no priority on local human resources, so of course they relied on outside labor, and sucked in large migration into the towns.”

    (Page 2 of 2)



    Limits on religious freedom have been a major cause of discontent. In the Jokhang itself, and in the Potala Palace, the imposing white-walled winter fortress of the Dalai Lamas, images of the exiled 14th Dalai Lama have been banned. Pilgrims carry the Dalai Lama’s photograph in hidden lockets or amulets. As the pilgrims circle the Potala, a loudspeaker in a small park blares Communist Party propaganda: “We are part of a Chinese nation contributing to a great future — we are Chinese people.”

    Enlarge This Image

    Adrian Bradshaw/European Pressphoto Agency
    Train passengers arriving in Lhasa on a new high-altitude train that connects Tibet to the rest of China.
    Adrian Bradshaw/European Pressphoto Agency
    A woman showing off her new home, part of a resettlement program.
    Development programs are sometimes well received, and sometimes they create resentment. Since 2006, the Tibetan government has mandated that Tibetan farmers, herders and nomads use government subsidies to build new homes closer to roads. New concrete homes with traditional Tibetan decorations dot the stark brown countryside.

    But the base government subsidy for building the new homes is usually $1,500 per household, far short of the total needed. Families have generally had to take out multiple times that amount in interest-free three-year loans from state banks as well as private loans from relatives or friends.

    “Though the government assures that villagers have not borrowed beyond their means, many villagers around Lhasa have expressed pessimism about their ability to repay these loans, suggesting that the degree of debt for the new houses is beyond what they are comfortable with,” said Emily Yeh, a scholar at the University of Colorado at Boulder who has researched the program. “This should become clearer over the next few years as loans start to become due.”

    In the model village of Gaba, right outside Lhasa, residents leased out their farmland for eight years to Han migrants to pay back the loans, which mostly ranged from $3,000 to $4,500. The migrants grow a wide variety of vegetables to be sold across China. Many of the Tibetan villagers now work in construction; they cannot compete with Han farmers because they generally know how to grow only barley.

    “Renting out the farmland was suggested by the bank,” said Suolang Jiancan, the village head. “It would be a guaranteed income to pay back the loans.”

    Among the Han, it is not just farmers who are profiting from the land. Large companies from other parts of China are finding ways to tap Tibet’s resources.

    On July 19, China National Gold Group, the nation’s largest gold producer, began work at a polymetallic mine whose daily output is expected to reach 15,000 tons. Tibet has more than 3,000 proven mineral reserves, including China’s biggest chromium and copper deposits. China Daily, an official English-language newspaper, quoted a Tibetan official in March saying that mining could make up at least 30 percent of Tibet’s gross domestic product by 2020, up from 3 percent now.

    A prominent mineral water company called 5100 that is registered in Hong Kong but managed from Beijing has set up a factory in Damxung, on a grassy plateau three hours north of Lhasa, to collect glacial runoff and bottle it as high-end mineral water. Last year, the company, named after the altitude of the glacier, produced almost two million gallons of water. The water is shipped out on the Qinghai-Tibet railway.

    The water that is collected would otherwise flow through wetlands where yak graze. It is unclear how the factory’s work has affected the ecosystem. Jiang Xiaohong, the factory manager, who moved to Tibet three years ago, said the company did an environmental assessment before starting operations in 2006. “There’s no impact on the wetlands,” she said.

    Because the company employs Tibetans, it receives government subsidies, Ms. Jiang said. About 95 percent of the 150 or so workers are Tibetan, and the average salary, including housing subsidies, is about $740 a month, a small fortune on the Tibetan plateau, she said. But ethnic Han are the company’s managers and owners, and the ones who ultimately profit from it.

    Mr. Hao, the regional vice chairman, said the key to making Tibetans more competitive in business “is to enhance Tibetan people’s skills through education and training.”

    The government has encouraged wealthier Chinese cities to finance school construction in Tibet. In the city of Shigatse, four hours from Lhasa, the Tibet-Shanghai Experimental School was completed in 2005 with an investment of $8.6 million from the Shanghai government. The principal, Huang Yongdong, arrived in January from Shanghai for a three-year posting. Nearly 1,500 students, all Tibetan, attend junior and senior high schools here.

    A portrait of Mao hangs in the lobby. All classes are taught in Mandarin Chinese, except for Tibetan language classes. Critics of the government’s ethnic policies say the education system in Tibet is destroying Tibetans’ fluency in their own language, but officials insist that students need to master Chinese to be competitive. Some students accept that.

    “My favorite class is Tibetan because we speak Tibetan at home,” said Gesang Danda, 13. “But our country’s mother tongue is Chinese, so we study in Chinese.”

    On a blackboard in one classroom, someone had drawn in chalk a red flag with a hammer and sickle. Written next to it was a slogan in Chinese and Tibetan: “Without the Communist Party, there would be no new China, and certainly no new Tibet.”
     
  5. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    Chou en Lai was a pragmatic person even if, what the Americans call - a sharp cookie!

    In so far as he is concerned, the old Chinese saying kai-kuan Lung-ting (the final verdict on a person's life is rendered when his coffin is sealed) is apt. He is what the Chinese call pu-tao-weng (the weighted doll which when knocked on its side returns to the upright position).

    Chou en Lai could be termed as the real originator of new China. Inspite of Mao being a leader and a Oracle like figure to the Chinese and who could do no wrong, was constantly balanced by Chou en Lai. Chou started the 'Four Modernisation' and he ensured that Deng, who worked with Lao Shiaqi after the 'Great Leap Forward' to restore the shattered economy done by Mao and who was condemned as the 'Number Two Capitalist Roader', was reinstated as Deputy Premier.

    Therefore, such a statement from Chou en Lai is not surprising.
     
  6. ajtr

    ajtr Veteran Member Veteran Member

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    BBC taken on rare escorted visit of Tibet

    In March two years ago there were protests and unrest in parts of the Tibet plateau in the weeks before the Beijing Olympics.

    China continues to keep Tibet largely closed to foreign journalists.

    A small group of reporters, including the BBC's China Correspondent, Damian Grammaticas, have been taken on a rare escorted visit to the region.



    Is development killing Tibet's way of life?

    China is bringing development to Tibet, changing it, trying to make it modern, but some Tibetans are worried that their region's unique identity is being eroded.

    Our was a rare, Chinese government-controlled trip to Tibet.

    Our schedule and our movements were almost entirely controlled by official minders who rarely let us out of their sight.

    Almost all the people we spoke to were hand-picked to show us China's view of Tibet.
     
  7. amoy

    amoy Senior Member Senior Member

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    It's always a dilemma, not only for China, but also for all big multi-ethnic countries ( I dare to say) like India, like Russia

    Some say all the problems result from 'inadequate development' (not developed enough) Problems arising (e.g. competition btwn Tibetans and inflowing Hui or Han) can be resolved through MORE 'development' - such as educaiton and trainings to enhance competitiveness of Tibetan youth, job opportunities, subsidies, 'comfortable' housing, and more tourists..

    Some others argue that kind of 'development' is not what natives (in this case Tibetan) want. They'd prefer 'peace of mind' or an undisturbed 'spiritual life' to hussle and bustle. They don't like inflowing mercernary businessmen (Muslims, Hans) who pollute their surroundings. They'd like to preserve their simple but 'self-sufficient' lifestyle as well as the environment, and that's what tourists come for and appreciate.


    There seems no consensus for 'development' yet.
     
  8. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    A very balanced post on the situation in Tibet.

    Almost as good as what Chou would have said! :happy_2: No offence meant!

    Are the Huis also in the game to ‘populate’ Tibet? The Hui, though Muslims, have become Han in all respect, except that they don’t eat pork, which is the staple of the Chinese. Xinjiang, a Muslim majority and adjacent province to Tibet is turbulent owing to various factors, including external assistance as is felt in China. Is it wise to populate a region that is not in synch with the Han Chinese policies with people who have a religion akin to the turbulent and adjacent Xinjaing?

    Development is welcome to all people, but they must feel that it is for their good that the development is being done and not because it is to the advantage of the Govt and not for them. Crushing the culture, language, religion of peoples steeped in these aspects to replace with modernisation and pressures to change can always have the repercussions that we see in Tibet.

    In India, development occurs, but in the underdeveloped areas, when the conglomerates are observed ruining the environment that the tribal have lived with all their lives and their ancestors’ lives for the sake of development (which is necessary), they naturally rebel. However, in India, one does not enforce a different language, culture and the like. Even so, some rebel. Development thus has to be done in a measured manner and the locals have to be incorporated in a big way and in such a way they do not feel that they (the tribal) are getting the lower end of jobs with ‘outsiders’ taking the plum jobs. Also, unlike China or Russia, there is no one majority community, that could be looked upon as swamping the tribal. In fact, there is no majority community in India. And though Hindi is the language of communication, this language is not spoken by the majority of Indians and instead is the language that is spoken by the single largest population cross section.


    Education and patience is the answer.

    I cannot comment on how religion affects the people of China, but it is a serious business in other countries. The number of people who flocked to the Christian Churches after the fall of Communism in Russia and the Eastern Bloc is indicative of the power of religion that is kept latent under Communist regimes!

    The problem of Poland with Russia and Germany are but the effect of a feeling of Polish culture and identity being suppressed by the two during different phases of history. Maybe the same is the issue of Tibetans with China.
     
    Last edited: Jul 26, 2010
  9. amoy

    amoy Senior Member Senior Member

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    Hui, whose origins (Arabs, Persians, Mongols, Hans, Central Asians through silk roads or Genghis Khan conquest) are very complex,, may be upset or even offended by tags like 'becoming Hans' or 'except they don't eat pork', although there're some of them (especially in the South) are no longer Muslims. In Ningxia, in Gansu (West), Shaanxi and even Yunnan, Beijing they're still pious Muslims mostly, distintively different from Hans.

    Unlike what u may have perceived Muslims are widespread across China but other than the religion different ethnic groups don't have much in common. Hui also had a bitter history with Hans especially in Shaanxi Province where massacres took place 150 years ago sparked by trivial feuds. Their flow to Tibet from underdeveloped West is mainly economically triggered, unlike some may put - a game of 'deliberately populating Tibet with non-natives'.

    When we talk about one minority's rights we can't deny a majority or another minority's rights (freedom to move to Tibet for example).

    Let's be fair. Without 'political correctness', we must admit different groups are at different stage of 'social development'. When u refer to 'outsiders' taking 'plum jobs', u have to note these 'outsiders' are of 'better education/trainings' or 'competence' FOR THE JOB (without prejudice or sense of superiority or inferiority). Enforcing a common language in my opinion is for better adapting to a modern world where communication is a must.


    How are Religion and 'Development' interacting ? It's an open-end question.
     
  10. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    The Huis unlike the relaxed Uighurs have developed the Han aggressiveness towards trade and money. In the 14th Century, they were forced to intermarry with the Hans. Consequently, they speak Chinese and their customs and mosques are all Chinese style. It is said that the other Muslim minorities of China have traditionally been highly critical of the Hui's adaptation of Islamic practices to Han ways of life. The Huis speak in Chinese and not in their original tongue since they have been Hanised. There are Islamic schools in the Hui cultural capital, Lingxia, teaching mostly the traditional Sufi sects, with even some meditation masters, yet the vast majority of Western Hui know hardly anything deep about Islam.

    Western Hui have been moving not only into Tibet, but also all over Gansu and Xinjiang as the pioneers for Han Chinese settlement. They open restaurants and shops along all the roads, and as soon as there are a small number of them in any locality, they build a mosque - usually as a social gathering place to keep their communities together, rather than because of religious zeal. Not only do the Tibetans resent the Hui immigration; but so do the Uighurs.

    It is correct that one should not deny majority rights to promote minority rights. However, the majority has to give space.

    Enforcing anything, be it language, culture or religion or any other issue, will have its natural backlash and all of it will not be pleasant. I don’t think that one language, one culture, one custom ruling supreme by quashing other minority groups is hardly the manner to have a vibrant country. Was it not the Great Helmsman, Mao Tse Tung, who said – Let a 100 flowers bloom and which the Chinese lapped up with enthusiasm?
     
  11. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    Development and Religion are not strictly intertwined.

    Yet, if people are mentally disturbed that their way of life, culture, traditions, customs, language and religion is being crushed underfoot with the aim to make it disappear and instead becoming clones of a single and dominant culture and people, there will be turmoil.

    If there is turmoil, it will come to pass that no development can take place,
     
  12. amoy

    amoy Senior Member Senior Member

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    'Forced marriage' - When Arabs/Persians/Central Asians (relatively small in number) came to China via different routes they tried to promulgate Islam and mingled with locals. Inter-marriage seemed inevitable and not prohibited by their doctrines with converted Hans or other locals. In 14th century Ming Dynasty did 'encourage' intermarriage at the very beginning, but forced??????

    Adaption to Han ways of life? Know little deep about Islam? I wish Huis would agree to your point. Religion is a private thing and each explores in his/her own way. So who can claim theirs is 'orthodox ' and others are 'heretic' or non-orthodox? A bit sensative when it comes to 'faith'. but frankly all religions are consisting of different 'factions' (Protestant vs. Catholic; Sufi vs Shi'a or Suni). "Judge not, that u be not judged".

    Pioneers of Han settlement? They moved all over China hundreds of hundreds of years ago via different routes. And do u know there were massacres in West China between Huis and Hans a hundred years ago?
     
  13. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    Forced marriage can also be claimed to be ‘encouraged’ marriage. Who are the real Hans? The whole of China was not Han. South of the Yellow River, they were taken to be ‘barbarians’ till they were Hanised and those who resisted were raw barbarians.

    Until the 1930s, the names of the outgroups (wai ren) were commonly written in characters with the animal radical: the Di, a northern tribe were linked to the dog; the Man and Min of the South were characterised with reptiles; the Qiangs were written with a sheep radical. This reflected the Han Chinese conviction that civilisation and culture were linked with humanity; alien groups living outside the pale of Han society were regarded as inhuman savages. If they were Hans, then why were they termed as 'barbarians'? Are there these 'barbarians' still in China? If not, were they exterminated so that there are no traces or were they 'assimilated' by Hanising them through intermarriages and forcing them to become Hans by adopting the Han way of life, culture and traditions?

    The custom of sharply distinguishing between the inner and outer people went along with the calling China the Middle Kingdom (zhong guo) , which began by ruling the Central plain (zhongyang) in North China. Rather than using outright military conquest, the theory of ‘using the Chinese ways to transform the barbarians (yongxiabianyi)’ was promulgated. By cultural absorption or racial integration through intermarriage, a barbarian could become a Han Chinese (Hanhua).

    Therefore, this was also the case of the Huis who were Hanised, unless of course, they were a special group.

    True that one follows his own conscience in the path to religion. However, in all religions, it is the priestly class (Mullahs in the case of Islam) who dictates what the true path is and what is the non adherent path. If it were not so, then there would have been no Talibans presenting a certain view and forcing the issue.

    In China, there is only a façade of religious freedom since the Priest of all religions are selected by the Communist Party and the religious dogmas.

    The government rejects exercise of any authority by organs of the Catholic Church outside China after 1949, the year communists gained power over all of mainland China. CPCA, which was founded eight years later, thus does not recognize the proclamation of the dogma of the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary by Pope Pius XII in 1950, canonizations from 1949 onward (e.g. the canonization of Pope Pius X), Vatican declarations on even well-established devotional piety (e.g. on the Sacred Heart of Jesus or on Mary as Queen), and the Second Vatican Council (1962-1965). In practice, however, the Catholic Church in China uses Chinese translations of the documents of the Second Vatican Council, of the 1983 Code of Canon Law, of the 1992 Catechism of the Catholic Church (revised in 1997) and of the 1970 Roman Missal.

    Massacres of Huis etc are but expected when they were forced to become Hans.

    Why do they follow Han practices that the Uighurs, who are also Muslims, don't?
     
    Last edited: Jul 27, 2010
  14. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    Sun Yat Sen, the founder of Chinese Republic overthrew the Qing Dynasty which ruled over all of China from 1644 to 1911 and proclaim when he launch his rebellion against the Qing Dynasty which was ruled by Manchus:

    “ In order to restore our national independence, we must first restore the Chinese nation. In order to restore the Chinese nation, we must drive the barbarian Manchus back to the Changbai Mountains. In order to get rid of the barbarians, we must first overthrow the present tyrannical, dictatorial, ugly, and corrupt Qing government. Fellow countrymen, a revolution is the only means to overthrow the Qing government!"

    Even the Manchus who were the Emperors of China were Hansied and there is hardly anyone who follows the Manchu customs and there is only a handful and vanishing speakers of the Manchu language.

    That is Hanisation!
     
  15. amoy

    amoy Senior Member Senior Member

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    When u quote Dr. Sun Yat-Sen's saying to support your point, I have to remind that Dr. Sun later strided ahead correcting his earlier narrow concept of 'revolution' to overthrow Manchurian rule. He instead called for a republic for "five nationalities" - Han, Manchu, Hui (inclusive of all Muslims), Mongolian and Tibetan. And then the national flag was a five-color banner symbolizing this notion. He enriched his theory with "Nationalism, Democracy, and Well-being of People" and "distribution of lands to peasants" instead of shallow anti-Manchu appeals.
     
  16. amoy

    amoy Senior Member Senior Member

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    Hanised? Similarly some feel we've got 'Westernized' culturally. Or the other side of the coin - 'civilized'? or 'modernised'? There're always 'pros' and 'cons' in getting 'assimilated'. in the endless process we more or less take up features that were once alienated to us. and we're consequences of those 'forced marriage' or integration i.e. with blood of 'barbarians' flowing in our veins.

    Of course such a process can be tough, bitter sometimes bloody. Also many might weep over what has been lost. But we've come along to be who we are.

    Your view is respected though it's different from some others' opinions that it's totally a personal pursuit and individual interaction with the Lord alone. That 'intermediary' class is not privileged in monopolizing the definition and seeking of 'true path' at all.

    As for that Ventican issue, Some applaud for the rejection >>
    According to the Bible
    They say unto him, Caesar's. Then saith he unto them, Render therefore unto Caesar the things which are Caesar's; and unto God the things that are God's.
    -- Matthew 22:21
     
  17. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    After a murder, second thoughts of not having done so is an automatic reaction.

    Therefore, after he could make the Hans rebel and achieve the aim, he could have even become the Buddha himself!
     
  18. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    It would be a wrong assumption that being ‘westernised’ is being civilised or modern. We, too, have such people who think so. A touch of inferiority complex I will say.

    True by assimilation what one loses on the roundabouts, one makes up on the swings. However, one loses one’s original identity and even forgets one’s origin. In India, we told not desire to have any community to get assimilated by being swamped. That is why it is an continuous effort to ensure that all maintain and encourage their distinct cultural identity.

    Since Chinese are not conversant with religion as practised around the world, it is difficult to understand that while religion is a personal faith and belief, yet it is the clergy which lays down the dogma. They monopolise and dominate and that is the unfortunate truth.

    In so far as religion is concerned, the ‘free world’ (a term that is popularly used to differentiate from the Communist world), they can cast the stone since religion and their priestly class are not under the fetters of a State sponsored control.

    Indeed the Hans by assimilating the 'barbarians' possibly believed that 'Render therefore unto Caesar the things which are Caesar's; and unto God the things that are God's'. The Hans thought possibly that they were Caesar and God rolled in one! :18:
     
    Last edited: Jul 28, 2010
  19. amoy

    amoy Senior Member Senior Member

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    It's always helpful for me to learn what the others think about Han (or any other groups of Chinese) with the same curiosity as I'm watching Indians or Indian History.

    And it's always interesting to know how people in the 'free world' see us in the 'communist world' (what stereotypes do they have in mind?), and CCP the monster...

    Frankly I feel AMUSING (no offensive) when I come across your line "Chinese are not conversant with religion as practised around the world". Obviously your 'world' does not include China, nor 1.4b Chinese??

    And your 'religion', with a 'priestly class', in my opinion, is but one of many forms YOUR religion takes in YOUR world (Sikh? Buddhism? Hinduism???)

    And of course I have a inferiority complex when I come to realize my ideas, expressed in a 'Western' language, are not superior at all in this diversified 'world', where I'm humbled to admit I may not be the one closer to 'truth'.

    One thing for sure, in the discussion, neither intends to force his/her own ideas upon the others.
     
  20. tarunraju

    tarunraju Moderator Moderator

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    That is a masterful statement from HH. He has effectively made sure that after his death China doesn't come up with a phony Dalai Lama that plays according to Beijing's tunes.
     

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