comprehensive national strength:China ranks 7th, India 9th

Discussion in 'China' started by great_han, Dec 26, 2009.

  1. great_han

    great_han Regular Member

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    Chinese Academy of Social Sciences report:
    On the comprehensive national strength China is only the world “Seventh”
    When the world pay close attention to the rapid increase China’s international status and discussion of “China-US cohabitation”, “two groups” (G2) may be formed, China’s official think tank, a study suggested that the comprehensive national strength, China is only the world’s ” 7th, “but second to the United States military forces.

    Academy of Social Sciences issued yesterday, “the international situation, yellow book”, for the West Group of Seven and the BRIC countries overall national competitions come to the conclusion that the United States, Japan, Germany, the world’s top three strengths, China ranked seventh.

    Country’s comprehensive national strength of these 11 rankings are: the United States, Japan, Germany, Canada, France, Russia, China, Britain, India, Italy, Brazil.

    According to Academy of Social Sciences Institute of World Economics and director of international politics, “the international situation, yellow book” Li Shaojun associate editor at the press conference yesterday on the introduction, the evaluation index system, including territory and natural resources, population, economic, military, science and technology 5 direct elements; and social development, sustainability, security and domestic politics, international contributions to the impact factor of four.

    But he stressed that this appraisal is reflected in the strategic reference value, can not be said to be more objective reflection of national strength, the value of appraisal should be reflected in the indicators for more comprehensive comparative aspects.

    Appraisal results show that Chinese scholars in the strategy will be the United States as the world’s truly a super power, particularly in the United States in military strength, leadership, far from the other country can shake.

    “Beige book” that the U.S. military spending equal to the sum of the other 10 countries 132% of its overall military strength of the total score of 90.08 points. China ranked second in total points scored just 33.3 points. Russia has a 22800 with a tank weapons and equipment strength, military capability ranks third in the world.

    The U.S. economy, science, technology and international contribution to the primacy of these three indicators, resources, ranking the second place. Only in social development, sustainability and security and domestic politics 3, the United States score lower.
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    English translated by: Chinese Academy of Social Sciences report: On the comprehensive national strength China is only the world “The seventh”” | Life on the Internet
     
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  3. badguy2000

    badguy2000 Respected Member Senior Member

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    hehe. what a good masterpiece of "Chinese National Strategical Foolyou Bureau“
     
  4. great_han

    great_han Regular Member

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    I think they are serious.
    China is no doubt a developing country with mount of domestic problems, though Chinese govt is very rich and powerful.
    Besides, being modest is the Chinese virture.
     
  5. Shredder

    Shredder Regular Member

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    Whenever I see pics of Chinese cities they look even way ahead of US ones and they are still developing, imagine when the China becomes a developed country!

    The Chinese people must indeed be very proud of their cities.
     
  6. great_han

    great_han Regular Member

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    Yes, the cities are amazing. Though the street and building seem tidy, the river and air is polluted. What's more, the farmers are commonly poor. But they have their farmlands, so it's possible for them to have a house and earn a living. While if they want to be better off, they have to gofar to coastal factories. The farmers are tax-free, though they are poor
     
  7. rockdog

    rockdog Guest

    Some famous sayings: Eastern China like Europe, Western China like Africa; Cities like Europe, countryside like Africa....

    Even not like Africa, China still have large part of undeveloped area.

    For example:
    The poorest province called Guizhou Province, the Human Development Index is just same as the middle level of African nations...
     
  8. Agnostic_Indian

    Agnostic_Indian Regular Member

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    Chinese cities look good because china invests 50% of its GDP in to infrastructure.but i don't think it looks better than US.
     
  9. Tshering22

    Tshering22 Sikkimese Saber Senior Member

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    ^^ We could do the same and with stern sincere laws rather than bunch of lackeys running the country's law system. Barring its Communist roots, the Chinese government is doing very good job developing the country at such a rapid rate. Its ambition is to reach the status of US; But even if we count on our ambition to make South Asia the seat of our absolute power and prosperity, then we will have to get if not 100% as Chinese at least 50% of the cold feet they got when they started seriously pursuing national goals.
     
  10. badguy2000

    badguy2000 Respected Member Senior Member

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    our ambitions is beyond that!
     
  11. Armand2REP

    Armand2REP CHINI EXPERT Veteran Member

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    Your ambition should be increasing consumer spending. It is the only way you are going to get there.
     
  12. pmaitra

    pmaitra Moderator Moderator

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    There are places in India than can make you feel like you are in Silicon Valley; yet there are places in India that can make you feel like you are in Sub-Saharan Africa.

    One must, however, admire Chinese cities. They are indeed enviable and beautiful. Due credit goes to their centralised planning by virtue of, like it or not, a Communist government.
     
  13. pmaitra

    pmaitra Moderator Moderator

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    If I may, I'd throw some caution in the winds.

    Consumer spending should be towards goods and services that channelise most of the money back into the Chinese economy so that they in turn can generate more jobs. The more the money circulates, more will it multiply. When it comes to technology that must be imported, then, of course, importing those goods and services is unavoidable.
     
    Last edited: Oct 18, 2010
  14. Armand2REP

    Armand2REP CHINI EXPERT Veteran Member

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    Look over the next hill and you won't be so impressed. They dump their garbage in any open space they can find.
     
  15. Armand2REP

    Armand2REP CHINI EXPERT Veteran Member

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    If you don't get some of that money out of the country, it will lead to hyper inflation. China needs a good mix of domestic and foreign consumption.
     
  16. badguy2000

    badguy2000 Respected Member Senior Member

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    1. "china's consuption is not enough" is a pseudo-proposition,because the caculation of CHina's GDP is a mixture quite different from others.

    Instead ,if measured with the consumption of real wealth, instead of distorted exchange rate,CHinese comsuption is quite normal and healthy.

    you can insist a country short of comsuption ,which consumes global 1/2 of steel, concrete,household applliances and autos more than the combined of USA and Japan.
     
  17. Armand2REP

    Armand2REP CHINI EXPERT Veteran Member

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    China's domestic consumption has dropped from 55% to 35% of GDP. 1.3 billion Chinese consume less than the 60 million people of France. Buying concrete and steel is not private consumption, the government practically giving away white appliances is not private consumption. As Chinese wages rise, the percentage they spend on goods is dropping. It should be the other way around. The more income you have, the more of it should be disposable. There are 70 trillion RMB sitting in Chinese banks not making people any money. With inflation higher than interest rates, people are losing money. People are so over-leveraged in their homes, they have little money to spend on anything else. With little health insurance, people have to save in case they get sick and with 400 million smokers and filthy air, it is a certainty they will. Consumption is how much you spend, not how much you hoard. Saving money in China is a sure way to decrease your real wealth.
     
  18. pmaitra

    pmaitra Moderator Moderator

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    Very well said. That is what the Chinese are failing at. They should learn how to use capital to generate more capital. IMHO, a better way to build a nation is to have a balanced blend of socialism and capitalism. I think the Chinese don't want to see a scenario like, and are paranoid about, the former USSR whose demise was accelerated by the pretentiously smart self styled experts at IMF and their absolutely convoluted policies, for which I do not blame China at all.
     
    Last edited: Oct 19, 2010
  19. Armand2REP

    Armand2REP CHINI EXPERT Veteran Member

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    People like to portray China as some kind of market economy, there is nothing capitalist about it really. It is still centrally planned. Everything is tightly controlled by the CCP. The positive side is, they can react quickly to developing issues. The negative is a huge misallocation of resources because it is not determined by the demand curve. If the government wants to sell 10 million autos a year, they make it happen by stealing peoples motorbikes, banning old cars, and subsidising sales of new ones whether people can afford it or not. If people want to get around, they don't have any choice but to comply. If they want to increase real-estate values, they kick people out of their homes to build what they want. The excess waste in overcapacity is mind-boggling... 25% from real-estate to steel. China built itself up on the basic economic principles of the USSR, massive construction and infrastructure investment, factory style education, urbanisation and exports. Instead of exporting raw materials, they export cheap finished goods but the principle is the same. Communism has lasted longer in China because they did not have the raw materials they could sell without forging trade ties to the West. They had to play ball so to speak in order to keep their factories open which has added stability and adaptability to changes in the global economy. The lack of an arms race prolongs the system by propping up its unprofitable SOEs that maintain employment. Not to mention China is largely a one-culture society that has far less diversity and foreign nationalism than the former Soviet Empire. Also a huge population leads to decades of easily tapped growth when the base was little more than rice paddies. China has exhausted the economic system that saw its rise, demand for exports is not coming back. People say how developed Chinese cities are, and it is largely true... where is China to go from there? The only answer is to increase domestic consumption. You can't rely on exports and construction for markets that are already 25% over capacity.
     
  20. badguy2000

    badguy2000 Respected Member Senior Member

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    you got you idea by adopt distorted exchange rate. the same quality hair-cut cost 10 time more in France than in CHina. exchange rate distorted the truth much.


    In fact, 1.3 billion CHinese consumes 10 times more steel,concretes,household appliances,food.clothes then France.

    Everyear, CHinese buy more cares as many as the whole EU combined.

    the only difference is that the same quality service in CHina is 10 time cheaper than that in France.
     
  21. pmaitra

    pmaitra Moderator Moderator

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    Chinese products and their unfair advantage against foreign products

    China says US-Chinese ties linked

    By FOSTER KLUG (AP) – Sep 22, 2010

    NEW YORK — Chinese Premier Wen Jiabao called Wednesday for improved ties between his country and the United States, saying that U.S.-Chinese business interests are "inextricably connected."

    Relations between the two powers have suffered recently, and Wen's comments appear to be an effort to soothe anger in the United States ahead of a Thursday meeting with U.S. President Barack Obama. The countries are squabbling over a number of economic, trade, military and diplomatic matters, even as the United States pushes for Chinese help in settling nuclear standoffs with North Korea and Iran and on other global initiatives.

    Wen told U.S. business executives on the sidelines of a United Nations summit that China wants a "strong and stable U.S., just as the U.S. needs a strong, stable China," The Wall Street Journal reported.

    The politically sensitive U.S. trade deficit with China jumped to $26.2 billion in June, the largest one-month gap since October 2008. Wen, however, said the trade imbalance isn't intentional. Wen also was quoted as saying that the exchange rate of the yuan — China's currency — isn't the "main cause" of the bilateral trade imbalance.

    Ahead of U.S. congressional elections in November and at a time of high American unemployment, China's currency policies are a major source of friction in ties with Washington. U.S. lawmakers say Beijing's tightly regulated yuan is undervalued, giving China's exporters an artificial advantage over U.S. manufacturers. They say Chinese policies cost Americans their jobs.

    Obama, speaking Monday in Washington, said China's currency "is valued lower than market conditions would say it should be."

    "So it gives them an advantage in trade," Obama said. "We are going to continue to insist that on this issue, and on all trade issues between us and China, that it's a two-way street."

    Some U.S. lawmakers are pushing for a bill that would punish China if it doesn't do more to let the yuan rise.


    The Obama-Wen meeting also comes as China lashes out at the United States for what Beijing says is interference in its territorial disputes in the South China Sea. China is also angry over U.S. arms sales to Beijing rival Taiwan and Obama's meeting earlier this year with the Dalai Lama, the exiled Tibetan Buddhist leader China calls a separatist.

    Although the Obama administration wants to take a tough line with China ahead of the elections, it also recognizes that Beijing is crucial to dealing with a number of global problems. China is a veto-wielding member of the U.N. Security Council and recently passed Japan as the world's second-biggest economy.
    Separately on Wednesday, Wen called for rich countries to help the poor fight AIDS.

    Wen said at an AIDS meeting with African leaders that ignorance and discrimination can be as painful as the disease itself.
    China, he said, would continue a "tireless campaign" against AIDS around the world. It has been a "tough and protracted battle, yet we have never shown fear or backed down," Wen said.

    The U.N. has estimated that $28 billion to $50 billion will be needed annually between 2011 and 2015 to achieve universal access to treatment for HIV/AIDS.

    Source: http://www.google.com/hostednews/ap/article/ALeqM5jvNcgOcHdNtuBG4RZJtJCd4GYFmQD9ID5T7G2
     

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