Coast Guard names ship after Pride of Kannada, Rani Abbakka

Discussion in 'Indian Navy' started by Singh, Jan 28, 2012.

  1. Singh

    Singh Phat Cat Administrator

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2009
    Messages:
    20,305
    Likes Received:
    8,270
    Location:
    011
    Coast Guard names ship after Rani Abbakka


    BANGALORE: The Indian Coast Guard (ICG) put the pride of Kannada one notch up by naming its first inshore patrol vessel (IPV) after Rani Abbakka, a legendary queen of Ullal in Mangalore. Rani Abbakka is the first of a series of five IPVs, designed and built by Visakhapatnam-based Hindustan Shipyard Limited. The news of the IPV being named after a Kannada brave heart was welcomed by former Karnataka Ithihasa Academy president Suryanath U Kamath. “It was during my tenure that a resolution was passed that Rani Abbakka should find a prominent place in today’s time and space. She was a lady who defeated the Portuguese during the fierce naval battle in 1618. She belonged to the Chawta family, originally from Moodbidri. We are happy that our request to name one ship in memory of her naval victory is finally fulfilled,” Kamath said.

    He said along with the Samithi, the Kannada Shakthi Kendra too wanted a ship named after the queen. “We had published our resolution in local dailies then and was extremely happy to see a newspaper advertisement recently announcing the commissioning of ICG Ship Rani Abbakka. This is a matter of great pride for each one of us in Karnataka,” said Kamath, who was the chief editor of Karnataka State Gazetteer (1981-1995).

    Giving a glimpse of Rani Abbakka’s exemplary will in taking on the mighty Portuguese, he said here planning and war tactics left the invading forces clueless. “The Portuguese (over 200 of them) came to coastal areas of Karnataka and demanded goods be sold at a price fixed by them. Rani Abbakka (whose mother was also the Queen of Ullal), protested the demand. She asked the people to not yield to the men and with the help of Prince Venkatappa Nayak of Keladi (a town in Shimoga district), she took the
    Portuguese head on,”
    Kamath said.

    On Monday, a statue of Rani Abbakka (riding a horse) was installed at Ullal, while another one (standing next to a canon) was erected at Yeshwanthpur in Bangalore. “It is a matter of great pride for the people of Karnataka that a Coast Guard ship now carries the name of the great warrior Rani Abbakka. I am delighted that the announcement of the ship’s commissioning came at a time when the whole nation is gearing up for the Republic Day. Her story is really inspiring and I salute the spirit at which she took on the Portuguese,” Governor H R Bhardwaj told Express.

    If Rani Abbakka’s is a story of valour, then the ship boasts of state-of-the-art features. It has onboard navigational/communication sensors and next generation equipment. Among the special features are an integrated bridge system, machinery control system and a home-grown gun mount with fire control system. To be manned by five officers and 34 men under the command of Commandant C Vivekananda, Rani Abbakka will be based at Chennai.

    Coast Guard names ship after Rani Abbakka | Rani Abbakka | | The New Indian Express
     
    parijataka and Tolaha like this.
  2.  
  3. KS

    KS Bye bye DFI Veteran Member

    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2010
    Messages:
    8,008
    Likes Received:
    5,718
    Location:
    irrelevant
  4. Singh

    Singh Phat Cat Administrator

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2009
    Messages:
    20,305
    Likes Received:
    8,270
    Location:
    011
    Brief History of Rani Abbakka

    Rani Abbakka Chowta was the Queen of Ullal who fought the Portuguese in the latter half of the 16th century. She belonged to the Chowta dynasty who ruled over parts of coastal Karnataka (Tulu Nadu),India.Their capital was Puttige. The port town of Ullal served as their subsidiary capital. The Portuguese made several attempts to capture Ullal as it was strategically placed. But Abbakka repulsed each of their attacks for over four decades. For her bravery, she came to be known as Abhaya Rani ('The fearless queen'). She was also one of the earliest Indians to fight the colonial powers and is sometimes regarded as the 'first woman freedom fighter of India'.

    Historical background

    After overrunning Goa and taking control of it, the Portuguese turned their attention southwards and along the coast. They first attacked the South Kanara coast in 1525 and destroyed the Mangalore port. Ullal was a prosperous port and a hub of the spice trade to Arabia and other countries in the west. Being the profitable trading center that it was, the Portuguese, the Dutch and the British vied with one another for control of the region as well as the trade routes. They however, had not been able to make much headway as the resistance from the local chieftains was very strong. The local rulers even forged alliances cutting across caste and religion lines.

    Though Abbakka was a Jain by faith, her administration was well represented by Hindus and Muslims. Her army too consisted of people of all sects and castes. She even forged alliances with the Zamorin of Calicut.Together, they kept the Portuguese at bay. The marital ties with the neighbouring Banga dynasty added further strength to the alliance of the local rulers.

    Battles against the Portuguese

    The Portuguese, clearly upset by Abbakka's tactics, demanded that she pay them tribute but Abbakka refused to yield. In 1555, the Portuguese sent Admiral Dom Álvaro da Silveira to fight her after she refused to pay them tribute. In the battle that followed, Rani Abbakka once again managed to hold her own and repulsed the attack successfully.

    In 1557, the Portuguese plundered Mangalore and laid it waste. In 1568, they turned their attention to Ullal but Abbakka Rani resisted them yet again. João Peixoto, a Portuguese general and a fleet of soldiers where sent by the Portuguese Viceroy António Noronha. They managed to capture the city of Ullal and also entered the royal court. Abbakka Rani, however, escaped and took refuge in a mosque. The same night, she gathered around 200 of her soldiers and mounted an attack on the Portuguese. In the battle that ensued, General Peixoto was killed,[5] seventy Portuguese soldiers were taken prisoners and many of the Portuguese retreated. In further attacks, Abbakka Rani and her supporters killed Admiral Mascarenhas and the Portuguese were also forced to vacate the Mangalore fort.

    In 1569 however, the Portuguese not only regained the Mangalore fort but also captured Kundapur (Basrur). Despite these gains, Abbakka Rani continued to remain a source of threat. With the help of the queen's estranged husband, they mounted attacks on Ullal. Furious battles followed but Abbakka Rani held her own. In 1570, she formed an alliance with the Bijapur Sultan of Ahmed Nagar and the Zamorine of Calicut, who where also opposing the Portuguese. Kutty Pokar Markar, the Zamorine's general fought on behalf of Abbakka and destroyed the Portuguese fort at Mangalore but while returning he was killed by the Portuguese. Following these losses and her husband's treachery, Abbakka lost the war, was arrested and jailed. However, even in prison she revolted and died fighting.

    Folklore and legend

    According to traditional accounts, she was an immensely popular queen and this is also attested by the fact that she is even today a part of folklore. The queen's story has been retold from generation to generation through folk songs and Yakshagana, a popular folk theatre in Tulu Nadu. In Bhuta Kola, a local ritual dance, the persona in trance recounts the great deeds of Abbakka Mahadevi. Abbakka is portrayed as dark and good looking, always dressed in simple clothes like a commoner. She is portrayed as a caring queen who worked late into the night dispensing justice. Legends also claim that Abbakka was the last known person to have the used the Agnivana (fire-arrow) in her fight against the Portuguese. Some accounts also claim that she had two equally valiant daughters who fought alongside her in her wars against the Portuguese. Tradition however treats all three - mother and two daughters as the same person.

    Abbakka Chowta - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
     
    parijataka and Tolaha like this.
  5. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

    Joined:
    Apr 17, 2009
    Messages:
    43,117
    Likes Received:
    23,545
    Location:
    Somewhere
    It is good thing that such naming of ship resurrects history that many are not aware of.

    Doing a good service to the Nation and the people too!
     
    W.G.Ewald and Singh like this.
  6. bhramos

    bhramos Elite Member Elite Member

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2009
    Messages:
    13,208
    Likes Received:
    6,641
    Location:
    Telangana/India/Bharat
    ICGS Ranni Abbakka

    [​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]
     
    W.G.Ewald and Singh like this.

Share This Page