Clinton regrets for Salala attack, Pakistan to Open NATO Supply Line

Discussion in 'Pakistan' started by ajtr, Jul 3, 2012.

  1. ajtr

    ajtr Veteran Member Veteran Member

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    US yields to new terms of engagement

    Statement by Secretary Clinton on her Call With Pakistani Foreign Minister Khar

    Press Statement
    Hillary Rodham Clinton
    Secretary of State
    Washington, DC
    July 3, 2012


    This morning, I spoke by telephone with Pakistani Foreign Minister Hina Rabbani Khar.

    I once again reiterated our deepest regrets for the tragic incident in Salala last November. I offered our sincere condolences to the families of the Pakistani soldiers who lost their lives. Foreign Minister Khar and I acknowledged the mistakes that resulted in the loss of Pakistani military lives. We are sorry for the losses suffered by the Pakistani military. We are committed to working closely with Pakistan and Afghanistan to prevent this from ever happening again.

    As I told the former Prime Minister of Pakistan days after the Salala incident, America respects Pakistan’s sovereignty and is committed to working together in pursuit of shared objectives on the basis of mutual interests and mutual respect.

    In today’s phone call, Foreign Minister Khar and I talked about the importance of taking coordinated action against terrorists who threaten Pakistan, the United States, and the region; of supporting Afghanistan’s security, stability, and efforts towards reconciliation; and of continuing to work together to advance the many other shared interests we have, from increasing trade and investment to strengthening our people-to-people ties. Our countries should have a relationship that is enduring, strategic, and carefully defined, and that enhances the security and prosperity of both our nations and the region.

    The Foreign Minister and I were reminded that our troops – Pakistani and American – are in a fight against a common enemy. We are both sorry for losses suffered by both our countries in this fight against terrorists. We have enhanced our counter-terrorism cooperation against terrorists that threaten Pakistan and the United States, with the goal of defeating Al-Qaida in the region.

    In addition, I am pleased that Foreign Minister Khar has informed me that the ground supply lines (GLOC) into Afghanistan are opening. Pakistan will continue not to charge any transit fee in the larger interest of peace and security in Afghanistan and the region. This is a tangible demonstration of Pakistan’s support for a secure, peaceful, and prosperous Afghanistan and our shared objectives in the region. This will also help the United States and ISAF conduct the planned drawdown at a much lower cost. This is critically important to the men and women who are fighting terrorism and extremism in Afghanistan. Foreign Minister Khar has informed me that, consistent with current practice, no lethal equipment will transit the GLOC into Afghanistan except for equipping the ANSF. In concluding the call, I reiterated our deep appreciation to the Government and the people of Pakistan for their many sacrifices and their critical contribution to the ongoing fight against terrorism and extremism.

    Najam Sethi's take:






    US yields to new terms of engagement

    [​IMG]
    USA begs for forgiveness

    ISLAMABAD: The United States has accepted the new terms of engagement with Pakistan covering all aspects of bilateral ties between the two countries as enumerated by Islamabad, possibly bringing to an end the acrimonious relationship between the two countries created in the wake of the Salala attack last November.
    Pakistan accepted the set of proposals handed to it by the high-powered US mission during the two-day talks that ended here on Monday evening.


    The draft of the understanding will come up for formal approval in the meeting of the Defence Committee of the Cabinet (DCC) that is scheduled for today (Tuesday) with Prime Minister Raja Pervaiz Ashraf in the chair, following which the federal cabinet will endorse the decisions of the DCC tomorrow (Wednesday).

    US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton will call her counterpart in Islamabad Hina Rabbani Khar and will convey the apology for the Salala incident :p after which the remaining issues will be settled one after the other as the ground lines of communication (G-LOC) are reopened.
    The route will be strictly used only for non-lethal goods for the troops combating in Afghanistan. The passage fee per container would be charged according to its size and the stuff carried would be subject to scrutiny as no weapon or ammunition would be allowed to be transported.

    The US has assured Pakistan that it would respect Pakistan’s sovereignty and intelligence sharing will guide the use of drones in difficult terrain of the tribal areas.

    Federal Minister for Finance Senator Hafeez Shaikh told The News late Monday evening that once the United States had agreed to almost all the conditions set by Pakistan, one should not think in acrimonious terms. Khar, who also looked jubilant about the developments, said “We are close to a new beginning.”

    In the meantime, highly-placed diplomatic sources told The News that Washington had assured Islamabad that it would release half of the payment equaling $400 million under the Coalition Support Fund (CSF) next week while the rest would be released within this year.
    The United States had pledged that it would pay Pakistan $800 million in the year 2011 for providing assistance in the ‘war on terror’ but tension in ties came in the way of payment according to the stipulated time. The US is bound to pay Pakistan an amount of 2.5 billion US dollars.


    The United States will also discuss at the appropriate level the realisation of funds under the Kerry-Lugar law which will help improve the balance of payment and allow the government to fulfill the fiscal commitment it had made in the budget for the next year with its people. With this, the military cooperation between the two defence establishments would also be restored to the normal scale, sources maintained.

    The sources said that Finance Minister Senator Hafeez Shaikh, who led Pakistan in talks with visiting US Undersecretary of State Thomas Nydes, has reported to Prime Minister Raja Pervaiz Ashraf about the outcome of the negotiations on Monday evening. Foreign Minister Hina Rabbani Khar was also present.

    Pakistan’s Ambassador in the United States Sherry Rehman has arrived here in the wee hours of Tuesday. She will also attend the DCC on special invitation.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 10, 2015
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  3. Bhadra

    Bhadra Defence Professionals Defence Professionals Senior Member

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    re: US yields to new terms of engagement

    USA begs for forgiveness and yields to new terms of engagement





    US yields to new terms of engagement

    what ! with Clinton saying Namste to Pakistanies in Indian style. Itching for a Sazda !
     
  4. utubekhiladi

    utubekhiladi The Preacher Elite Member

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  5. LETHALFORCE

    LETHALFORCE Moderator Moderator

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    Re: US yields to new terms of engagement

    Supplies never stopped lethal supplies were still flown from Pakistan this was all a drama by
    pakistanis to fool it's public and extort more money from US.
     
  6. Bhadra

    Bhadra Defence Professionals Defence Professionals Senior Member

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    Re: US yields to new terms of engagement

    Loote jawo, loote jawo jab tak unke pas dollar bache hain, uske baad to chinese kagaz hi milenge
     
  7. ajtr

    ajtr Veteran Member Veteran Member

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  8. Tolaha

    Tolaha Senior Member Senior Member

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    Re: US yields to new terms of engagement

    Less of news report and more of a fantasy wish list from Pakistan! :)
     
  9. Re: US yields to new terms of engagement

    i wonder why is she making an Indian greeting gesture (Namaste) in that pic

    from the uniform of officers in the background it seems she's in Pakistan . . . .
    cryptic message ??

    Anyway
    USA begs for forgiveness ..........

    ??

    really . . . .
    Given the time and sniveling on the part of Pakistani authorities it has taken....

    Pakistan begging for apology . . . . US Considers. . .

    Assuming sckeptically that this article contains any grain of Truth .

    Anyway here are some more reliable source to the same news
    which not surprisingly makes no mention of any apology ...or non lethal BS

    http://ca.reuters.com/article/topNews/idCABRE86116920120702?pageNumber=1&virtualBrandChannel=0

    http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/feedarticle/10317884
     
    Last edited: Jul 3, 2012
  10. Neil

    Neil Senior Member Senior Member

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    Re: US yields to new terms of engagement


    she is Thailand...thats a thai police uniform....u know pakis....they do anything to justify themselves...
     
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  11. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    Re: US yields to new terms of engagement

    The USA is not a bunch of flat footed folks.

    There will have to be much to read between the lines.
     
  12. sukhish

    sukhish Senior Member Senior Member

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    Re: US yields to new terms of engagement

    everthing will be done over the phone, secreat apology, secreat agreement, secreat drone strikes, secreat soveranity etc etc etc. I thought it was suppose to be unconditional public apology.
     
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  13. sukhish

    sukhish Senior Member Senior Member

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    Re: US yields to new terms of engagement

    the only purpose of this new paper is to bring pakistan is good light, it is to project as if pakistan has won over the U.S, even though nobody apologized in public. the crux of the matter is pakis generals are feeling the heat and they will accept anything now.


    "The US has assured Pakistan that it would respect Pakistan’s sovereignty and intelligence sharing will guide the use of drones in difficult terrain of the tribal areas."

    just two days ago there was a drone stike. did they consulted the intellegence agencies for that one. it is actually pakistan apologizing for its sovereignty now.
     
  14. sukhish

    sukhish Senior Member Senior Member

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    Re: US yields to new terms of engagement

    Deal with USA | The Nation

    go and read it.
     
  15. hit&run

    hit&run Elite Member Elite Member

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    Re: US yields to new terms of engagement

    Pak PM has hinted it and Clinton was biggest advocate of someone from US doing this apology drama. She was able to draft an apology before but Pakistan refused to accept it. The interesting thing is they are going to pay the same transit fee they were paying before :rofl:. mother-in-law vs daughter-in-law fight on dead bodies of Pak soldiers (not saying they were killed for wrong reasons).
     
  16. ajtr

    ajtr Veteran Member Veteran Member

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    Pakistan Opens NATO Supply Line as Clinton Apologizes

    WASHINGTON — Pakistan told the United States it was reopening NATO’s supply routes into neighboring Afghanistan after Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton said she was sorry for the deaths of Pakistani soldiers in American airstrikes in November, the State Department said Tuesday.

    The agreement ends a bitter seven-month stalemate between the two countries that has threatened to jeopardize counterterrorism cooperation and complicated the American troop withdrawal from Afghanistan.

    In a telephone call to Pakistan’s foreign minister, Hina Rabbani Khar, Mrs. Clinton said the two officials agreed that mistakes were made on both sides that led to the fatal airstrike.

    “We are sorry for the losses suffered by the Pakistani military,” Mrs. Clinton said in a statement issued by the State Department. “We are committed to working closely with Pakistan and Afghanistan to prevent this from ever happening again.”

    The November airstrikes, which killed 24 soldiers in Pakistani territory after reports of militant activity in the area, led Pakistan to immediately close the supply lines and plunged relations between the countries to a low point.

    The agreement on Tuesday followed a flurry of recent contacts between top American and Pakistani officials. Gen. John R. Allen, the American commander of NATO forces in Afghanistan, met last week in Pakistan’s capital, Islamabad, with Gen. Ashfaq Parvez Kayani, the Pakistani army chief of staff, to discuss counterterrorism strategy and the supply routes.

    Over the weekend, Mrs. Clinton telephoned her congratulations to Pakistan’s new prime minister, Raja Pervez Ashraf, and brought up the issue. And on Monday, Thomas R. Nides, a deputy secretary of state, visited Islamabad to discuss the routes.

    But the major stumbling block has been Pakistan’s demand for a formal American apology for the fatal airstrike in November. The Pentagon and the White House have adamantly opposed any additional apology beyond the several expressions of regret and condolences offered by many American officials — a carefully calibrated response during a hard-fought presidential campaign in the United States.

    In her statement on Tuesday, Mrs. Clinton again expressed “deepest regrets for the tragic incident” last November and offered the administration’s “sincere condolences to the families of the Pakistani soldiers.” But the clincher for Pakistan seemed to be Mrs. Clinton’s using the word “sorry.”

    In exchange, Pakistan dropped its insistence to charge a transit fee for each truck carrying NATO nonlethal supplies from Pakistan into Afghanistan, Mrs. Clinton said.

    It was not immediately clear why Pakistan dropped the demand for transit fees, which had been a hotly contested issue for months.

    Pakistan, stung by the suspension of American military assistance last year, at first demanded a fee of $5,000 for each truck that crossed its territory from the port in Karachi to Afghanistan. Before the November attack, NATO had paid $250. Pakistan later reduced that demand to about $3,000 a truck; the United States has offered $1,000 per vehicle, although some officials say the two sides have settled for about half of that.

    “This is a tangible demonstration of Pakistan’s support for a secure, peaceful, and prosperous Afghanistan and our shared objectives in the region,” Mrs. Clinton said in her statement, noting that waiving any transit fees will allow the United States and NATO to conduct “the planned drawdown at a much lower cost.”

    The Pentagon has offset the closed route by using a much longer, more expensive northern supply line that runs into Afghanistan through Central Asia. Defense Secretary Leon E. Panetta has said the route was costing an extra $100 million a month.

    Mr. Panetta on Tuesday applauded Pakistan’s decision, saying: "We remain committed to improving our partnership with Pakistan and to working closely together as our two nations confront common security challenges in the region."

    A top-level meeting of Pakistani civil and military leadership held in Islamabad on Tuesday evening gave the clearest indication of the Pakistani willingness to reopen the NATO supply routes.

    Prime Minister Raja Pervez Ashraf, who headed the meeting, said in a televised address that the supply line closures “not only impinge on our relationship with the United States but also on our relations with the 49 other member states of NATO/ISAF.”

    Salman Masood contributed reporting from Islamabad, Pakistan.
     
  17. ajtr

    ajtr Veteran Member Veteran Member

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    Re: Clinton Apologizes for Salala attack Pakistan to Opens NATO Supply Line

    Take it now pakistan hating indians its a slap on your face:rofl:
     
  18. ajtr

    ajtr Veteran Member Veteran Member

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    Re: Clinton Apologizes for Salala attack Pakistan to Opens NATO Supply Line

    US says 'sorry' for Salala attack: Clinton

    US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton has said that the US says “sorry” for the losses suffered by Pakistani military in the Salala check post attack.
    Pakistan is reopening vital Nato supply routes into Afghanistan closed since a deadly November attack, Clinton added.
    During a telephone conversation with her Pakistani counterpart Foreign Minister Hina Rabbani Khar, she “informed me that the ground supply lines into Afghanistan are opening,” Clinton said.
    Islamabad had long said that Washington must apologise for the air raid that killed 24 Pakistani soldiers before it would re-open the routes, closed in anger after the US attack.
    “Foreign Minister Khar and I acknowledged the mistakes that resulted in the loss of Pakistani military lives,” Clinton said in a statement.
    “We are sorry for the losses suffered by the Pakistani military. We are committed to working closely with Pakistan and Afghanistan to prevent this from ever happening again.”
    The blockade has forced the alliance to rely on longer, more expensive northern routes through Russia and Central Asia.
    No transit fee
    Initial hopes of a deal on re-opening the routes fell apart at a Nato summit in Chicago in May amid reports that Pakistan was demanding huge fees for each of the thousands of trucks that rumble across the border every year.
    But Clinton said: “Pakistan will continue not to charge any transit fee in the larger interest of peace and security in Afghanistan and the region.
    “This is a tangible demonstration of Pakistan’s support for a secure, peaceful, and prosperous Afghanistan and our shared objectives in the region. This will also help the United States and ISAF conduct the planned drawdown at a much lower cost.”
    The statement said that the Pakistani minister announced that “no lethal equipment will transit the GLOC into Afghanistan except for equipping the ANSF.
    Clinton said that she and the foreign minister spoke about “the importance of taking coordinated action against terrorists who threaten Pakistan, the United States, and the region; of supporting Afghanistan’s security, stability, and efforts towards reconciliation; and of continuing to work together to advance the many other shared interests we have, from increasing trade and investment to strengthening our people-to-people ties.”
    She added that both the countries should have a “relationship that is enduring, strategic, and carefully defined, and that enhances the security and prosperity of both our nations and the region.”
    Pakistan Taliban threatened to attack Nato supply routes after the announcement of reopening Nato supply routes came.
    Improving ties
    Severely strained ties between the United States and Pakistan are poised to improve after the two countries agreed to reopen ground routes key for the war in Afghanistan, Pakistan’s ambassador to the United States said.
    “We appreciate Secretary Clinton’s statement, and hope that bilateral ties can move to a better place from here. I am confident that both countries can agree on many critical issues, especially on bringing peace to the region,” Ambassador Sherry Rehman said in a statement.
    John Allen
    The US commander of Nato troops fighting the Taliban welcomed Pakistan’s decision to reopen Nato supply lines into Afghanistan after a seven-month blockade.
    General John Allen made the remarks in a statement released in Kabul that also paid tribute to the “sacrifices” made by Pakistani, as well as Afghan and Nato troops in the war.
    “I look forward to future opportunities to work together toward our common goals, by taking coordinated action against terrorists,” he said.
    Leon Panetta
    On the reopening of supply routes, Secretary Defence Leon Panetta said, “I welcome Pakistan’s decision to open the ground lines of communication. As I have made clear, we remain committed to improving our partnership with Pakistan and to working closely together as our two nations confront common security challenges in the region.”
    The Salala incident had prompted Pakistan to conduct a policy review of its ties with the US, demanding that the US issue a high-level apology over the incident, and end drone strikes before the routes would be reopened.
    The US, on numerous occasions expressed regret over the incident, but did not offer a clear apology as demanded by Pakistan. ISAF Commander General Allen had also offered a “personal apology” to Pakistan army chief.
    Clinton’s statement came as Pakistan held a meeting of its Defence Committee for Cabinet (DCC), chaired by Prime Minister Raja Pervaiz Ashraf, to discuss the Nato blockade.
     
  19. ajtr

    ajtr Veteran Member Veteran Member

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    Re: Clinton Apologizes for Salala attack Pakistan to Opens NATO Supply Line

    Pak to re-open supply routes as Hillary apologises over NATO strike


    Washington: In what could be a turning point for US-Pak ties, US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton on Tuesday apologised over the NATO attack last year, leading Pakistan to re-open the supply routes to Afghanistan.

    Calling NATO airstrike on Salala checkpost last year a “mistake” , US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton said that the US was “sorry” for the loss of Pakistani military lives.

    The ties between the two nations have been on the rocks ever since the Nato forces attacked Salala checkpost last November killing 24 Pakistani soldiers.



    The incident had caused much furore with Pak going for a complete review of its ties with the US and demanding a high-level US apology over the air raid.

    Pakistan also pitched for an end to US drone strikes inside Pakistan, before it would re-open the supply routes to Afghanistan.

    But it seems that Hillary has been successful in convincing Pak by regretting over the “mistake” committed by the US.

    Hillary said her Pakistani Foreign Minister Hina Rabbani Khar, during a telephone talk, "informed me that the ground supply lines into Afghanistan are opening".

    "Foreign Minister Khar and I acknowledged the mistakes that resulted in the loss of Pakistani military lives," Clinton said in a statement.

    "We are sorry for the losses suffered by the Pakistani military. We are committed to working closely with Pakistan and Afghanistan to prevent this from ever happening again," Clinton said.

    "Pakistan will continue not to charge any transit fee in the larger interest of peace and security in Afghanistan and the region. This is a tangible demonstration of Pakistan's support for a secure, peaceful, and prosperous Afghanistan and our shared objectives in the region."

    Hillary’s statements came on the sidelines of a crucial meeting on security issues being held today by Pakistan's highest decision-making body.

    The meeting is expected to stipulate new terms of engagement with the US and the reopening of NATO supply routes to Afghanistan.

    The meeting of the Defence Committee of the Cabinet is being chaired by new Prime Minister Raja Pervez Ashraf and attended by key ministers, including Foreign Minister Hina Rabbani Khar, army chief Gen Ashfaq Parvez Kayani, other service chiefs and ISI chief Lt Gen Zahir-ul-Islam, officials said.

    Sources in Islamabad said the two sides are expected to issue a joint statement on the NATO attack and the need for greater cooperation to avert such incidents as the US is unlikely to offer an outright apology when the Obama administration is gearing up for the next general election.

    The statement, meant to satisfy the Pakistani demand for an apology, has been "carefully worded in a manner that satisfies the concern of both sides," the Dawn newspaper reported today.

    Details of the arrangement for reopening the NATO supply lines were reportedly stitched together by Gen Kayani and Gen John Allen, commander of the International Security Assistance Force in Afghanistan, who has visited Islamabad twice in less than a week.

    Gen John Allen is also the one, who had offered a “personal apology” to General Kayani over the Salal incident, but Pakistan had put it aside calling it “insufficient” and demanding a “proper” and “high-level” apology from the US.

    It seems that Hillary’s regret may finally break the ice and thaw the relations between two allies.

    With PTI inputs
     
  20. KS

    KS Bye bye DFI Veteran Member

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    Re: Clinton Apologizes for Salala attack Pakistan to Opens NATO Supply Line

    LOL CLinton did not apologise...it was ISAF commander Gen.John Allen who extended a "personal apology" to Kayani.
     
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