Chinese troops seal off Tibetan protest region

Discussion in 'China' started by Ray, Jan 29, 2012.

  1. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    A typically Chinese way to ensure that news of violent protest does not reach elsewhere in China and never in the international arena.

    As they did for the Tibet Uprising, they have once again sealed off the restive area to blanket out the news and reality and carry out inhuman repression to bring the area under effective control of the Communist machinery!
     
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  3. Yusuf

    Yusuf GUARDIAN Administrator

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    Problem is that the Chinese have never lost blood themselves because of the non violent nature of the Tibetan movement. I wonder what will happen if large scale armed movement is kindled? Or should I say rekindled after more than 50 years?
     
  4. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    Chinese Crackdown Seals Off Ethnic Unrest

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    CHENGDU, China — This regional metropolis is roughly 200 miles from the wave of protest by ethnic Tibetans that is sweeping the towering mountains of western Sichuan Province. But take a stroll through Chengdu’s Tibetan quarter, and the tensions generated by the distant unrest become palpable.

    Faced with the largest outbreak of Tibetan unrest since riots in Lhasa and elsewhere in 2008, the government is taking no chances that the turmoil — which has included Chinese forces firing on and killing some demonstrators — will spread.

    Armed soldiers in dun-colored camouflage trooped up and down Wuhouci Hengjie, a tree-shaded lane that is home to two government offices. Police cars, vans and even tow trucks, their red-and-blue light bars flashing, were stationed every 50 to 100 yards. Bands of police officers patrolled the sidewalks; on one corner, they upbraided an angry Tibetan man as anxious women grabbed his arms, pulling him away.

    Asked about the heavy security, one shopkeeper sarcastically suggested the forces were in town to prevent rowdiness during the spring festival, a traditional Chinese holiday.

    He added quietly: “I don’t dare talk. The police came to my shop and told me not to spread the word.”

    But word of the unrest has spread anyway, despite a crackdown that has sealed off outside access to western Sichuan and, by some reports, disabled telephone and Internet communications in some restricted areas.

    The Chinese government says it is only defending loyal citizens from revolutionaries who seek to sever Tibet from Chinese rule. Many outsiders, and perhaps most Tibetans, believe otherwise, casting the latest unrest as a continuing struggle against Chinese repression of political and religious freedoms.

    The recent troubles appear to have intensified when four Tibetans set themselves on fire this month, accelerating a campaign of self-immolation that has killed at least 11 Tibetans since March 2011.

    Groups favoring more freedom for ethnic Tibetans say the shootings started in the middle of the month, when a crowd of Tibetans tried to take away the body of a Tibetan man who had set himself on fire in Aba, or Ngaba in Tibetan, northwest of Chengdu.

    Since then, the groups say, they have received reports of protests and more shootings, with three shooting deaths in the past week. Because of the security cordon, those reports could not be independently confirmed. The clashes have unfolded mostly in areas where Buddhist monasteries or schools have long been centers of opposition to Chinese rule.

    Last Monday, the London-based advocacy group Free Tibet said, Chinese forces killed at least one person and wounded at least 34 in Luhuo, or Draggo, a monastery town west of Chengdu.


    On Tuesday, another man is said to have died in Sertar, or Seda, a town that had been a center of Buddhist teachings, hosting nearly 9,000 students, until Chinese authorities ordered most of the Larung Gar religious academy vacated in the last decade.

    And last Thursday, a man in Rangtang township, or Dzamtang, was fatally shot as Tibetans tried to stop the authorities from detaining another man accused of distributing leaflets about the self-immolations.

    The government has acknowledged the shootings in Sertar, but it said its forces fired on protesters after demonstrators fired on them, wounding 14 officers.

    It is likely that protests have also occurred elsewhere, both Tibetans and officials of advocacy groups said last week. “We heard from people coming from our hometown that people of our ethnic group have clashed with the People’s Liberation Army,” said one woman from Ganzi Prefecture. “We can’t fight them. There are too many.”

    A reporter who sought on Thursday to drive to Ganzi was halted at a police checkpoint halfway to his goal and, after inspection of his journalist’s visa, politely but firmly turned away.


    “There is thick ice ahead,” the police said. “It is not suitable for foreign guests.”

    Two backpackers were also ordered to turn around, but were told that the area was unsafe because “the Tibetans are in revolt.”

    By week’s end, a full-scale lockdown of the restive area appeared to be in effect, with milder restrictions from Chengdu to Lhasa, Tibet’s capital and the scene of the worst riots in 2008.

    The Chinese government has said 18 civilians and a policeman died during violence that was directed at Han Chinese migrants, whose growing presence angered many native Tibetans. Tibetan groups say the violence left scores of Tibetans dead at the hands of Han Chinese residents and government security forces.

    Security patrols have been significantly beefed up in Lhasa, and the authorities are conducting house-to-house searches to document the identities of residents, said Stephanie Brigden, the director of Free Tibet.

    She said officials were letting residents know that they knew who had relatives outside the country, and that they expected the residents not to tell those relatives what was happening.


    “They say that they know if they are making international telephone calls, and if they are, they shouldn’t discuss anything political,” Ms. Brigden said. “They’re really using intimidating tactics to make sure information isn’t disseminated.”


    But some inside the locked-down area are getting their information out in other ways. Posts on Twitter and Chinese microblogs documented some of the local reaction to the strife before being deleted from Chinese sites.

    “A cold morning in Danba County town,” one post stated. “It’s all very chaotic over here, with the police searching all nonlocal vehicles and all the hotels aren’t being allowed to accept Tibetans or foreigners.”

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    http://www.nytimes.com/2012/01/29/w...-tibetan-unrest.html?_r=1&partner=rss&emc=rss
     
    Last edited: Jan 29, 2012
  5. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    The Han Chinese are known for their ruthlessness and barbaric tendencies.

    To them life is cheap.

    They will if need be undertake a more thorough genetic cleansing.
     
  6. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    This report from China Post, Taiwan


     
  7. The Messiah

    The Messiah Bow Before Me! Elite Member

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    how can sri lankan buddhits jump into same bed with chinis after seeing how brutally china is treating buddhits in tibet ?
     
  8. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    It is obvious that given the unrest in Sichuan, the Chinese are worried that the Tibetans returning may have been enthused by the Tibetan organisations outside China to organise further unrest that will embarrass the Chinese Govt or create worse law and order situations.

    It is obvious that they will be investigated and interrogated very vigorously.
     
  9. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    CNN was never liked in China. Therefore, it is not a very unusual an action for the Chinese to take.

    It is also a normal practice for China to seal off regions where there is turmoil. It happened in Tibet also. All tourists and foreign media are thrown out and none allowed to enter.

    Having sealed the area of off, the Chinese go into action in the Chinese style to quell the rebellion.
     
  10. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    An ingenuous way to install a new 'Buddha'.

    Budha mil gaya!

    It is very nice of Padma Choling, Beijing appointed chairman of the regional government to have said to convey that the hanging of the portrait was meant to express the “heartfelt gratitude of Tibetans for the PRC central government and the Communist Party of China”.

    Setting themselves on fire and protesting makes me wonder what so heartfelt gratitude that they are showing to China?
     
  11. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    Who is fanning Tibet's flames?

    It was just a few minutes to one in the afternoon last Thursday.

    Standing at a road junction in a town in Sichuan, in south-western China, was a young woman.

    Without warning, she doused herself in petrol - she may even have drunk some - and then set fire to herself.

    Tibetans say her name was Palden Choetso; she was 35 years old and had been a Tibetan Buddhist nun since the age of 20. Official Chinese reports gave her name in Chinese as Qiu Xiang.

    Her death, it is thought, was swift and, one can only imagine, agonising.

    So what drives someone to such an awful, desperate step? In fact, what drives 11 people to willingly burn themselves like this?
    'Desperate situation'

    That is what has happened so far this year in Aba and Garze (known in Tibetan as Ngaba and Kardze), both Tibetan areas of Sichuan.

    Two of those who set fire to themselves have been nuns; nine of them were men, monks or former monks. Six of the eleven have died, the fate of the others is not know.

    Palden Choetso (or Qiu Xiang) was the oldest; the youngest was 18.

    This wave of self-immolations is unprecedented. So what is happening in these Tibetan communities? Who or what is fanning the flames?

    China is keeping foreign journalists out of the areas. Tibet's exiled leadership says those who set fire to themselves shouted slogans as they did so: "Long live his holiness the Dalai Lama", "Let the Dalai Lama return to Tibet", and "Freedom for Tibet".

    On Monday the Dalai Lama, speaking in Japan, said: "Some kind of cultural genocide is taking place... that is why you see these sorts of sad incidents happen, due to the desperateness of the situation."

    Tibet's Prime Minister-in-exile Lobsang Sangay has been more explicit. "The monks and nuns who immolated themselves were sacrificing their bodies to draw the world's attention to Chinese repression in Tibet," he said.

    "While the leadership in exile does not encourage self-immolation," Mr Sangay added, "we must focus on the causes... the continuing occupation of Tibet and the Chinese policies of cultural repression, cultural assimilation, economic marginalisation and environmental destruction."
    'Inciting'

    Unsurprisingly, China has pointed the finger straight back. The Xinhua news agency said of Qiu Xiang's death that "initial investigation showed the case was masterminded and instigated by the Dalai Lama clique, which has plotted a chain of self-immolations in the past months for splitting motives".

    China's Foreign Ministry spokesman Hong Lei criticised the exiled leaders for "refusing to denounce the self-immolations", charging that instead "they are publicising these events, and inciting further immolations".

    The US Department of State has weighed in too, saying it has "repeatedly urged the Chinese government to address its counter-productive policies in Tibetan areas that have created tensions".

    Amid the finger-pointing one thing is clear. The immolations have gone on and on.

    The first was by a 20-year-old monk called Phuntsog in March. China responded by deploying thousands of armed police, locking down monasteries, pressuring many monks to undergo "patriotic re-education", and shipping hundreds more away to an unknown fate.

    But none of that has stopped the burning. There is, it seems despair among some Tibetans. Why else would a 20-year-old, or a 35-year-old, choose - willingly, it seems - to die in petrol-fuelled flames lit by their own hands?

    Are they a few manipulated by leaders outside Tibet or are they indicative of broader discontent?

    China says it is working to bring progress and development to Tibetan areas. It is hoping those, and a firm hand when it comes to security, will end the tensions. But what if its policies are not working?

    The question we should perhaps be asking then is not so much who is fanning the flames, but rather what will douse them?

    BBC News - Who is fanning Tibet's flames?
     
  12. bhramos

    bhramos Elite Member Elite Member

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  13. mylegend

    mylegend Regular Member

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    A theocracy of Tibetan Exiles.
     
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  14. mylegend

    mylegend Regular Member

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    In 1957, the Chinese leaders decided to end slavery in Tibet. Then, only about 5 percent of the Tibetans were monks or nuns, or belonged to the small noble class or free nomadic hunting tribes. The rest were slaves who had to toil to feed the non-productive elite of the population. That's why the monasteries, the house of the elites, saw the abolition of slavery as a catastrophe.

    Posted else where, not my own word.
     
  15. SADAKHUSH

    SADAKHUSH Senior Member Senior Member

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    No matter how you twist the facts the truth rises above all the manipulation of your CCP thugs. If they were slaves before you abolished it than how come they did not protest or self immolation took place. Have you checked the manufacturing plants around your country and the working conditions along with the age group of workers? I would suggest you to do so and you will be exposed to the truth. The movement for freedom in Tibet is going to gain momentum in the near future and you can not stop it.

    When foreigners occupy a land whose natives had no Army to defend themselves than justify by saying they are here to free slaves from elites of the land. After that they start changing the demographics and force women to abort (MURDER) unborn child, I call this kind of treatment as a proof of true "SLAVERY".
     
    Last edited: Feb 10, 2012

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