Chinese Surveillance Aircraft Enter Taiwan's Airspace.

Discussion in 'China' started by Rushil51, Aug 27, 2014.

  1. Rushil51

    Rushil51 Regular Member

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2014
    Messages:
    414
    Likes Received:
    217
    Location:
    Castelia City
    The Taiwanese Air Force scrambled combat aircraft to pursue Chinese surveillance aircraft that made four separate intrusions into Taiwan’s airspace within less than 12 hours, a senior Taiwanese military official confirmed on August 26, one day after the standoff.

    According to information provided by Taiwan’s Ministry of National Defense, the first intrusion occurred at 8:33 a.m., when a single Y-8 Maritime Patrol Aircraft that had taken off from Chenghai, Guangdong Province, passed through the southwestern margin of Taiwan’s Air Defense Identification Zone (ADIZ). The aircraft cruised through the zone for approximately 10 minutes at an altitude of about 22,000 feet before exiting the zone and heading for the Philippines, one of China’s principal adversaries in escalating territorial disputes over areas of the South China Sea (Taiwan is also a claimant). The Y-8 passed through the same area at 10:56 am on its return journey to China, again spending about 10 minutes in the zone.

    On both occasions, Taiwan dispatched Mirage 2000-5 aircraft to shadow the intruder.

    A second incident, involving a different Y-8 from Chenghai, occurred at 2:31 p.m. as the aircraft headed for the South China Sea and at 4:57 p.m. as it returned to base in China. This time, Taiwan scrambled F-CK-1 “Ching Kuo” Indigenous Defense Fighters to intercept the aircraft. The Taiwanese Air Force did not confirm the number of aircraft that were deployed during the two incidents.

    “We followed them closely to make sure they left our ADIZ,” Taiwanese Air Force Major General Hsiung Hou-chi told reporters on August 26.

    In the past, Chinese military aircraft heading for contested areas in the South China Sea normally made detours to avoid entering Taiwan’s airspace. As there were two separate incidents on the same day, we can probably rule out pilot error, which appears to have been the case in June 2011, when two Chinese Su-27 combat aircraft “inadvertently” crossed into Taiwan’s side of the median line in the Taiwan Strait while on a mission to drive away a U.S. U2 spy plane. The intruders did not turn back until the Taiwanese Air Force sent two F-16 fighter aircraft to intercept them, prompting some military observers to ask whether Taiwan had “rescued” the U.S. plane.

    Given what we know, we can conclude that the August 25 intrusions were intentional.

    One possibility is that the People’s Liberation Army (PLA) was seeking to gauge Taiwan’s surveillance capabilities and response mechanism. Chinese electronic surveillance aircraft last year committed similar intrusions near Okinawa and close to the disputed Senkaku/Diaoyu islets in the East China Sea to — it is speculated — evaluate Tokyo’s ability to respond (Japan’s response was to scramble F-15 aircraft). Soon thereafter, China declared its controversial ADIZ over the East China Sea. Some analysts believe that China is drawing up plans to establish an ADIZ in the South China Sea, though Beijing has yet to give any concrete indication that it intends to do so.

    Alternatively, the intrusions may have been more political, done in reaction to a recent confrontation between a J-11 fighter aircraft from the PLA and a U.S. Navy P-8 Poseidon surveillance plane near Hainan. After that incident, Beijing’s requested that the U.S. military cease conducting close air surveillance operations in international waters along its coast.

    If they were indeed intentional, the latest intrusions could signal a further denigration of Taiwan’s sovereignty, perhaps driven by Beijing’s more pressing imperatives within the region (i.e., the South China Sea disputes). So far this remains an isolated incident. Much more concerning would be if such intrusions became part of a pattern. The incident calls for vigilance on Taiwan’s part, and serves as a reminder that despite the current détente in the Taiwan Strait, the island must retain the ability to control and defend its airspace.

    Source-:- Chinese Surveillance Aircraft Enter Taiwan’s Airspace | The Diplomat
     
  2.  
  3. s002wjh

    s002wjh Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jul 9, 2009
    Messages:
    1,209
    Likes Received:
    126
    air defense zone, not taiwan air space.
    taiwan air defense zone cover part of fuji province in mainland :)

    its actually heading to south china sea from taiwan source.
     
  4. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

    Joined:
    Apr 17, 2009
    Messages:
    43,118
    Likes Received:
    23,545
    Location:
    Somewhere
    The Taiwan Air Force should have shooed the Chinese plane
     
  5. J20!

    J20! Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Oct 20, 2011
    Messages:
    1,746
    Likes Received:
    664
    Location:
    Some where in Li Na's imagination
    The diplomat is slowly becoming irrelevent as an independent blog and is leaning more on the side of a Japanese govt mouthpiece. Considering that some of Taiwan's ADIZ is over mainland China, how does a transit flight qualify as an "intrusion" into Taiwanese "airspace"?

    Information warfare is becoming the standard in news "reporting" these days. Compare and contrast the diplomats reporting on the intercept of US surveilance planes off PLAN naval bases and this "intrusion" into Taiwanese "airspace" during transit flights to and from the SCS. "Journalism" is dead, and propaganda has taken its place.
     
    Last edited: Aug 27, 2014
  6. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

    Joined:
    Apr 17, 2009
    Messages:
    43,118
    Likes Received:
    23,545
    Location:
    Somewhere
    The Chinese ADIZ is over disputed water and territory.

    Taiwan still claims that the Mainland is theirs.

    As far as Propaganda goes, the Communist Chinese Central Propaganda Department officially changed its English name to Central Publicity Department in 1998, while its Chinese name was unchanged.

    The Chinese word xuānchuán (宣传) means "to disseminate" or publicize information and is translated as "propaganda" and is commonly used in phrases such as chǎnpǐn xuānchuán (product promotion).
     
    Last edited: Aug 27, 2014
    Yusuf likes this.
  7. J20!

    J20! Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Oct 20, 2011
    Messages:
    1,746
    Likes Received:
    664
    Location:
    Some where in Li Na's imagination
    Hardly an isolated phenomenon. The ADIZs of RoK, Japan and Taiwan all covered "disputed water and territory" before China declared its own last year.

    Whether Taiwan claims mainland China or not is a moot point; those PLAN surveillance turboprops where still flying in sovereign PRC, then international airspace.

    Are you suggesting that Chinese military aircraft not fly in airspace recognized by the UN as sovereign PRC as well as international airspace so as not to - as the Diplomat put it - "violate" Taiwanese "airspace"( actually its ADIZ)?

    It would be ridiculous of me or anyone else to claim that the Chinese govt does not use propaganda domestically and on foreign audiences for whatever purpose.

    it would be equally as ridiculous to assume that only China engages in propaganda to achieve its domestic and geopolitical aims in East Asia, or globally. It's an Information or Propaganda war, ie two sides engaged in a competition for domestic and international public approval.

    http://www.businessinsider.com/ndaa-legalizes-propaganda-2012-5

    Or is the "Chinese Surveillance Aircraft Enter Taiwan's Airspace" title, an editorial "mistake" on the Diplomats part? Because it most definitely isn't factual, and is, to put it mildly, extremely misleading to misrepresent an ADIZ(mostly international airspace) as "Taiwan's Airspace".


    Sent from my iPod touch using Tapatalk
     
    Last edited: Aug 28, 2014
  8. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

    Joined:
    Apr 17, 2009
    Messages:
    43,118
    Likes Received:
    23,545
    Location:
    Somewhere
    It is not so ridiculous as you claim.

    There have been enough instances on this very forum where propaganda has been used by the Chinese posters as 'news'.

    But then, in Chinese language, it means the same thing as I have pointed out.
     
  9. HMS Astute

    HMS Astute Regular Member

    Joined:
    Jul 26, 2014
    Messages:
    802
    Likes Received:
    230
    Location:
    Italy
    China planes 'violated Taiwanese airspace'

    Two Chinese military aircraft violated Taiwan's airspace on Monday, officials said, causing Taiwan to scramble jets.

    Taiwan said Chinese Y-8 maritime patrol planes entered the island's ADIZ (air defence identification zone) in both the morning and the afternoon.

    Taiwan scrambled planes which "followed them closely to make sure they left", an air force spokesman said.

    The alleged incident came days after the US accused a Chinese plane of dangerous manoeuvres near its aircraft.

    Washington said the Chinese aircraft came within 10 metres of a US Navy patrol plane over international waters off Hainan Island on 19 August.

    China described the claims as "groundless", saying the pilot's conduct was "professional".

    BBC News - China planes 'violated Taiwanese airspace'
     

Share This Page