China's Top Ten Criteria for a Technologically Advanced Nation

Discussion in 'China' started by Martian, May 5, 2011.

  1. Martian

    Martian Respected Member Senior Member

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    I have made my final selection for the tenth criterion to measure the technological capability of a nation. I believe that ASAT technology is a worthy test because it is a fusion of rocketry, advanced sensors, guidance systems, kinetic-kill warhead, and strategic utility. With ASAT, a country can deprive another of its GPS system (if it has one), spy satellites, communications satellites, etc.

    If you disagree with any of the selections on this list or if you think another choice is more worthy, please explain your reasoning in detail and I will consider modifying this list. Thank you.

    1. Send taikonaut into space and conduct spacewalk. (Ultimate test of aerospace technology)



    2. Build indigenous Aegis-class destroyer with advanced phased array radars. (Sophisticated radar technology and integrated battlespace defense)

    Type 052C Lanzhou-class destroyer can be seen at 1:16 in the video.


    3. Build fifth-generation stealth fighters. (Military technology prowess for air dominance; by controlling the airspace, you control the high ground and can rain bombs down at will)



    4. Build world's-fastest bullet trains that travel an average of 380 kph. (Amazing mechanical engineering)



    5. Build world's-fastest supercomputer. (Unmatched computer technology)



    6. Launch a record 15 rocket/satellite launches in 2010 without a single failure. (Test of rocket reliability technology)



    7. Build nuclear submarines. (Complex compact nuclear reactor technology)

    If you have not yet seen this video then it is a MUST-watch! It is a dazzling display of the hardware in China's PLA Air Force. A Chinese nuclear submarine can be seen at 10:39 and a Type 052C destroyer at 10:47 in the video.


    8. Build a cryogenic rocket engine. (Rocket engine technology for heavy-lift rocket)

    The following impressive video is a successful 200-second rocket-engine burn of the forthcoming 2014 Long March V. Having completed this milestone, the talented rocket scientists have moved on to designing and building the final heavy-lift rocket engine that will carry Chinese taikonauts to the moon.



    ----------

    To place the development of cryogenic rocket engines in its proper historical context, I thought you might want to know that NASA developed the world's first cryo engine in 1961 and China flight-tested her first cryo engine in 1984 (i.e. 27 years ago).

    Cryogenic rocket engine - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    "The first operational cryogenic rocket engine was the 1961 NASA design the RL-10 LOX LH2 rocket engine, which was used in the Saturn 1 rocket employed in the early stages of the Apollo moon landing program."

    YF-73 - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    "The YF-73 is China's first successful, cryogenic, gimballed engine, using liquid hydrogen (LH2) fuel and liquid oxygen (LOX) oxidizer. It was developed in the early 1980s and first flight was in 1984."

    9. Build commercial satellites that weigh over 5,000 kg or 10,000 pounds with a service lifetime of 15 years. (World-class satellite technology)

    [​IMG]
    DFH-4 satellite bus (or platform) designed and built by CGWIC (i.e. China Great Wall Industrial Corporation)

    10. Demonstrated ASAT (i.e. anti-satellite multistage missile) to destroy a satellite. (Critical capability to deprive another nation of its eyes and ears in the sky; also eliminates GPS guidance for opposing nation's weapons)

     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 10, 2015
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  3. Tolaha

    Tolaha Senior Member Senior Member

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    Martian,
    Is your name 'China'?

    If not, then the title should be "[Your Name here]'s Top Ten Criteria for a Technologically Advanced Nation.

    Once that's done, we all can safely breathe away thinking that this is one person's list rather than that of a nation. Unless you have taken a poll among Chinese citizens before posting this ofcourse!
     
  4. mileycyruslove

    mileycyruslove Regular Member

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    very insightful post, but i have to point out none of the achievements mentioned above can be considered as original or innovative.
     
  5. Martian

    Martian Respected Member Senior Member

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    No problem. I am Chinese. I vote in favor of this list. Therefore, on this forum, all of the Chinese members so far have voted for this list.
     
  6. badguy2000

    badguy2000 Respected Member Senior Member

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    they are all copies...
     
  7. Martian

    Martian Respected Member Senior Member

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    I will fix that too when confirmation is provided on China's Anti-Ship Ballistic Missile test.
     
  8. Martian

    Martian Respected Member Senior Member

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    China's innovations in civilian technologies

    If you want innovation, there are plenty of Chinese innovations in the civilian sector. I will provide a few examples.

    China Gets Success In Cloning World's First Rabbit - Science Ahead

    "China gets success in cloning world's first rabbit
    Parul G | Jul 24 2007

    [​IMG]

    After research of more than three decades in cloning and producing the first cloned animal, a goat in 2000, China has once again been successful in cloning world’s first rabbit. The Chinese scientists have produced the cloned female rabbit biologically, using the somatic cells of a rabbit fetus.

    Dr. Li Shangang who conducted the experiment of rabbit cloning is a researcher at the National Center for Molecular Genetics and Animal Breeding of the Beijing Institute of Animal Sciences.

    Dr. Li and his team chose the back skin cells of a 20-day old rabbit embryo. They cultured these cells into fibroblast cell lines. Then these fibroblast cells (donor cells) were fused with an enucleated rabbit’s oocyte (immature egg cell of animal ovary) through electric pulse. Thus cloned embroys were produced which were later transferred into the rabbit’s oviduct. The female clone rabbit was born after a month-long normal pregnancy on February 12 and had weighed 60 grams at birth. Now the rabbit is doing well and is at an animal center in Shanghai.

    The first animal to be cloned using somatic cells was the sheep - Dolly in 1996. Since then many other animals as mice, cattle and pigs have been cloned by scientists.

    In 2002, French scientists too had claimed to produce the world’s first cloned rabbit but that was done by using cells from an adult female rabbit. However, the Chinese rabbit is the world’s first clone rabbit that has used “fibroblast” cells from a fetal rabbit.

    On the achievement, Wang Hongguang, director of the China Center for Biotechnology Development affiliated to the Ministry of Science and Technology said:

    Chinese cloning research has reached a global advanced level. We can reproduce almost all the cloning results in top-class laboratories around the world. However, we are lacking in original creations such as the newly cloned rabbit.

    Rabbits are considered significant research tools because of their shorter gestation period than other big mammals such as sheep or cows.

    Malaysia has also turned to cloning and is in efforts to clone some of its threatened leatherback turtles to save them from extinction.

    Source: Reuters"

    [​IMG]

    "China's Liberation Daily reports today that the world's first transgenic-cloned rabbit is now three months old and living happily in Shanghai. The rabbit was cloned from the skin cells of a 20-day-old embryo, which were then implanted into the oviduct of a female rabbit."
    (The photo shows the cloned rabbit (left) and her surrogate mother.
    Posted by Xujun Eberlein)

    World's 1st GM cloned rabbit may reproduce in 3 months -- china.org.cn

    "As rabbits share similar genes with humans, the genetically-modified cloned rabbit is expected to be used for research into cardiovascular and eye diseases as well as some genetic ailments, said Dr. Li Shangang with the Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences."
     
    Last edited: May 5, 2011
  9. Godless-Kafir

    Godless-Kafir DFI Buddha Senior Member

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    Hahaha did someone hack Badguys account? :D
     
  10. Martian

    Martian Respected Member Senior Member

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    Superconductivity: One layer is enough

    Ministry of Science and Technology of the People's Republic of China

    "Superconductivity Found in One-Atomic-Layer

    Not long ago, a study, led by XUE Qikun, CHEN Xi, and JIA Jinfeng at Tsinghua University Dept. of Physics, in collaboration with a team headed by MA Xucun with the Chinese Academy of Sciences Institute of Physics, Prof. WANG Yayu, Tsinghua University Dept. of Physics, Prof. LIN Haiqing at the Chinese University of Hong Kong, and Prof. LIU Ying of the Pennsylvania State University Department of Physics and Material Research Institute, has found superconductivity in one-atomic-layer metal films grown on Si substrates. One-atomic-layer is the ultimate thickness a practical material can reach. The finding, published in the recent online issue of Nature Physics, renders a solution to the question concerning how thin a superconductor can be."

    Superconductivity: One layer is enough : featured highlight : NPG Asia Materials

    "Superconductivity: One layer is enough
    NPG Asia Materials featured highlight | doi:10.1038/asiamat.2010.78
    Published online 24 May 2010

    Superconductivity has been observed in films as thin as one atomic layer.

    [​IMG]

    Fig. 1: Scanning tunneling microscope image of a single atomic layer of lead (in the striped incommensurate phase) on silicon (image size is 50 nm × 50 nm).

    Superconductivity is a fascinating phenomenon. The signatures of superconductivity, such as its vanishing electrical resistance and expulsion of a magnetic field, as well as its potential for diverse applications, have intrigued scientists for decades.

    Nowadays, as low temperature ‘standard’ superconductors become better understood, attention has begun to focus on complex high-temperature superconductors. It is accepted that in these materials, lattice vibrations (referred to as phonons) mediate the formation of electron pairs, which is essential for the emergence of a superconducting phase. However, despite this recent trend in research, standard superconductors can still present intriguing results, as shown by Qi-Kun Xue and colleagues who have demonstrated that superconductivity can be observed even in single atomic layers of lead and indium1.

    Two-dimensional (2D) superconductivity is a rather fragile state of matter. It is therefore natural to wonder what is the minimum thickness needed to observe this phenomenon, or whether a single layer of ordered metal atoms, which represents the ultimate 2D limit of a crystalline film, could be superconducting. The team studied single-layer films of lead (Fig. 1) and indium grown on Si(111). Using scanning tunneling spectroscopy at high energy resolution, they observed a region of zero conductance for low applied voltage, terminated on each side by sharp peaks — the signature of superconductivity. Furthermore, the films exhibited vortices when a magnetic field was applied, confirming the existence of a superconducting phase.

    Through angular-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, the team found that for each metal the electron–phonon coupling was greatly enhanced with respect to the bulk case. This implies that the covalent silicon–metal bonding has a strong role in providing the mechanism for electron pairing, while the metal itself mainly provides the necessary carriers.

    “Our work sheds new light on the mechanism of superconductivity at reduced dimensionality, especially the crucial role played by the interface,” says Xue. “The tunable atomic and electronic structures in these well-defined 2D materials provide an ideal platform for testing various theoretical models when dealing with 2D many-body physics. In addition, the exploration of one-atomic-layer superconductors grown on silicon may also help to develop superconducting electronic circuits compatible with silicon technology.”

    Reference

    1. Zhang, T.,1,2 Cheng, P.,1 Li, W.-J.,2 Sun, Y.-J.,1 Wang, G.,1 Zhu, X.-G.,1 He, K.,2 Wang, L.,2 Ma, X.,2 Chen, X.,1* Wang, Y.,1 Liu, Y.,3 Lin, H.-Q.,4 Jia, J.-F.1 & Xue, Q.-K.1,2* Superconductivity in one-atomic-layer metal films grown on Si(111). Nature Phys. 6, 104 (2010). | article

    Author affiliation

    1. Key Lab for Atomic and Molecular Nanoscience, Department of Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China
    2. Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190, China
    3. Department of Physics and Material Research Institute, Pennsylvania State University, Pennsylvania 16802, USA
    4. Department of Physics, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China
    *Email: [email protected]

    This research highlight has been approved by the author of the original article and all empirical data contained within has been provided by said author."
     
  11. Martian

    Martian Respected Member Senior Member

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    Nanomechanics: Size matters

    Ministry of Science and Technology of the People's Republic of China

    "Strong Crystal Size Effects on Deformation Twinning

    Under the guidance of her tutor, YU Qian, a post-graduate at Xi’an Jiaotong University State Key Laboratory for Mechanical Behavior of Materials, in collaboration with Prof. LI JU with University of Pennsylvania Department of Materials Science and Engineering, and Dr. HUANG Xiaoxu of Technical University of Denmark Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, made an in-depth study of the deformation twinning behavior of nano-sized metal crystals and its impact on the dynamic performance of the materials. YU and coworkers found that the size of monocrystals is of a strong effect on the dynamic performance. The finding, published in the recent issue of journal Nature, provides a meaningful insight of materials performance evaluation and design; especially on material processing at the nano-scale utilizing the strong crystal size effect."

    Nanomechanics: Size matters : research highlight : NPG Asia Materials

    "Nanomechanics: Size matters
    NPG Asia Materials research highlight | doi:10.1038/asiamat.2010.56
    Published online 12 April 2010

    The deformation mechanism of single-crystal nanopillars has been shown to change dramatically at dimensions below one micrometer.

    [​IMG]

    Fig. 1: A scanning electron microscopy image of a nanopillar made from a single-crystal of titanium after it has been inelastically deformed.

    Reproduced from Ref. 1 (copyright); J. Sun, J. Li

    As electronic devices continue to shrink in size, it is becoming increasingly important to understand mechanical deformation at microscopic scales. Inelastic deformation — a type of deformation that persists even after an applied force is removed — can lead to device failure and occur primarily through two mechanisms: deformation twinning and ordinary dislocation plasticity. The mechanism that is activated depends on whether deformations across the sample are correlated.

    The origins of deformation twinning are poorly understood, as is the dependence of this mechanism on size. Now, a team of scientists from China, the US and Denmark, led by Jun Sun at Xi’an Jiaotong University and Ju Li at the University of Pennsylvania, have demonstrated that deformation twinning is completely suppressed in nanocrystals below a critical size[1].

    The researchers studied the deformation of pillars made from a single crystal of a titanium alloy using compression tests. Some of the tests were conducted while the sample was being observed by transmission electron microscopy. They found that when the pillars had a diameter of less than one micrometer, deformation twinning no longer occurred. This is in sharp contrast with bulk deformation of the same alloy, which is dominated by deformation twinning, which, it turns out, is more dependent on size than the action of dislocation plasticity.

    Sun, Li and their colleagues consider this strong dependence on size to arise from the collective nature of deformation twinning. Correlated deformations occur when strongly coupled defects catalyze the slip of adjacent crystal planes past one another. As the pillar diameter is reduced, defect coupling and twinning are both suppressed, leaving dislocation plasticity as the dominant mechanism for sufficiently small samples.

    “The research is in its early stages,” Sun says. “It is still quite fundamental, and the connection to new technologies cannot be known with certainty at the moment.” At the same time, however, micrometer-sized pillars are commonly encountered in a range of applications, suggesting that these findings could be relevant to many devices, including micro- and nano-electromechanical systems. Future work will involve the use of high-quality electron microscopy to better understand how crystal planes slip past each other.

    Reference

    1. Yu, Q.,1 Shan, Z.-W.,1,2 Li, J.,3 Huang, X.,4 Xiao, L.,1 Sun, J.1 & Ma, E.1,5 Strong crystal size effect on deformation twinning. Nature 463, 335 (2010). | article

    Author affiliation

    1. Center for Advancing Materials Performance from the Nanoscale (CAMP-Nano), State Key Laboratory for Mechanical Behavior of Materials, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an, 710049, China
    2. Hysitron Incorporated, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55344, USA
    3. Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104, USA
    4. Danish-Chinese Center for Nanometals, Materials Research Division, Risø National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark, DK-4000 Roskilde, Denmark
    5. Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218, USA
    *Email: [email protected]

    This research highlight has been approved by the author of the original article and all empirical data contained within has been provided by said author."
     
  12. Armand2REP

    Armand2REP CHINI EXPERT Veteran Member

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    WRONG
    ... China's ASAT was LEO, GPS sats are HEO.

    Don't worry... I WILL.

    Proven FAKE by release of mission transcript before launch.

    Proven FAILED by stop order of class and further destroyers comprising S-300Rif.

    Funny that you want us to look at animation when DDG 170 is firing S-300Rif a minute later. :pound:

    An empty shell with last gen subsystems is hardly a 5th gen fighter. It is a FAIL unless it enters service.

    France builds the worlds fastest bullet trains... Chinese doesn't even MAKE them.

    Made from US HARDWARE... lol


    What record?
    US launched 15 sats the same year and has done plenty more than that before. China had a failed launch at the end of 2009 so it is not so rosy.

    Noisiest fast attacks in the world along with boomers with no missiles. :pound:

    Even India has built a cryo engine... building one that WORKS is another story.

    And we verify this how? China launches and builds satellites for who to VOUCH for them? China pays OTHERS to build their modern satellites. :pound:

    Already DEBUNKED that claim.

    Conclusion... get off your high horse. Your tech isn't advanced unless it is bought from others or touted with propaganda with nothing to back it.
     
  13. lurker

    lurker Regular Member

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    1. According to this list Japan isn't a technologically advanced nation because it doesn't meet all 10 of the criteria, unless a technologically advanced nation does not have to meet all the criteria?

    2. This should be renamed to Martian's Top Ten Criteria for a Technologically Advanced Nation, or if you want to emphasize your Chinese citizenship (in your heart if not in your feet) 'A Chinese Citizens' Top Ten Criteria for a Technologically Advanced Nation.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 10, 2015
  14. Martian

    Martian Respected Member Senior Member

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    The enumerated 10 DIFFICULT objective criteria for today's superpower

    You are correct. Japan is merely an economically advanced country. Next to China, Japan is a pale shadow and lacks comprehensive technological power.

    Based on the enumerated ten objective criteria, it is obvious that Japan cannot match China's superpower accomplishments. An objective person would look at China's ten accomplishments and quickly realize that only the United States is comparable. No one else comes close. It is a fact.

    To make it easy, I'll discuss the first item on the list. Has Japan sent an astronaut into space and conducted a spacewalk? No? There you go. China is already ahead.

    Based on a single criterion (out of ten), the list has already been narrowed down to China, United States, and Russia. In the superpower race, no one cares about Toyota cars or Sony TVs. The first test is whether you can build a spaceship and conduct a spacewalk for the world to see. Japan fails and is eliminated from the competition.
     
    Last edited: May 6, 2011
  15. hehaozhi

    hehaozhi New Member

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    This list is too bias. Very few Chinese will even say China is a technology superpower.

    China is far behind USA as well as some other Europe nations and Japan in terms of technology innovation and engineering power.

    However, it is catching up, those Indian friends laughing and ignoring all the effort and endeavor of PRC is quit silly.

    By the way, the space walk was true,it was a huge project, there were lots of universities and labs involved, China is not as "controlled" as many foreigners thinks.
     
  16. AprilLyrics

    AprilLyrics Regular Member

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    only until we have 50 top universities in the world can we say our technology is a little advanced
     
  17. Martian

    Martian Respected Member Senior Member

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    Adding China's YJ-18 ASCM with terminal-stage Mach 3 MARV warhead.

    As technology continues to advance, the threshold for an advanced nation should also increase.

    China's YJ-18 anti-ship cruise missile is a superb design. It has a long range of 290 nautical miles. During the last 25 miles, the YJ-18 accelerates to Mach 3 and the maneuverable warhead engages in an evasive S-pattern before impact. It is deadly.

     
  18. Yumdoot

    Yumdoot Regular Member

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    China's Top Ten Criteria for a Technologically Advanced Nation
    Discussion in 'China' started by Martian, May 5, 2011.

    Now what kind of a person starts this kind of a discussion. Several years of being on the net, I could never have imagined that some day the world would be expected to measure up to the Chinese Criteria. :pound:

    Kind of sad that I missed this singular thread for last 5 years. :hail:
     

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