China's declining Job Market

Discussion in 'China' started by Ray, Aug 7, 2012.

  1. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    It appears that while the number of graduates are not less, jobs are not there for the picking in China.

    This is another area which will lead to social unrest unless China takes creation of job on a war footing.

    This is more important for China that for other countries because China has risen very rapidly from individual deprivations (under Mao) to a dazzling economy giving rise to ambition and wide aspirations.

    Making money is a very important aspect in the Chinese psychology and if the avenues are limited, then it becomes an area of immense discontent.
     
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  3. tony4562

    tony4562 Tihar Jail Banned

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    If job situation is bad in China (which I think it probaby is), one can only image what it is like in India, a country with 1.2 billion people (mostly young still growing ruthlessly) but only 10 million manufacturing jobs. Think an industrialized nation like Spain has 50% unemployment rate for people under 30, the same REAL figure for India probabloy lies at 80%.
     
  4. Virendra

    Virendra Moderator Moderator

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    Media reports :rolleyes:
    At least the lower level (labor) job market was booming a few months back. I read it in some media report just like this one.
     
  5. tony4562

    tony4562 Tihar Jail Banned

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    China is still very much a developing country and will stay this way for a long long time. The root of the cause is her population, 1.3+ billion people. With so many people, even very low fertility rate and population growth rate won't lead to labour shortage, not in the next 30-40 years at least. Just under half of China's population still lives in country side, and as usually the case with rural population in a developing country, it is underemployed. Currently, the retirement ages in China are very low (50 for women and 60 for men), in the future when the day of labour shortage finally arrives, a simple way to alleviate the problem could be to raise the retirement ages to the 65-70, currently common in west europe. But there is long long way to go before that happens.

    Any way too many people is never a good thing, That's why the much touted human-dividend in a certain south-asian country is a complete farce.
     
  6. huaxia rox

    huaxia rox Senior Member Senior Member

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    1 its not difficult to know whats happenning in indian job market such as Coming crisis: growth woes may shrink job market - Times Of India or RPT-INSIGHT-Deadly India car factory riot sounds alarm bells for industry | Reuters

    2 another recent article which also tells parts of the story in prc China's tight job market defies economic downturn | Reuters

    3 the global economic crisis is still developing which can affact all the countries....prc is still an export oriented economy so it will be affected as well. considering its major markets (the US the EU etc) r actually not getting recoverd any time soon we should expect some more bad news from the job market.

    4 another reason here is prc has been trying to turn its low tech world factory role to a higher level of which the process can lead to a lot of serious problems economically and socially (this has nothing to do with the current global economic crisis...its a change from inside)....job market is 1 of the prices we will have to pay....
     
  7. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    Don't worry about India.

    This thread is on China and it would be good to know about it, so that all are prepared not to face the same.

    In India because we are a spiritual people believing in religion, we will survive.

    But a country like China driven by GREED and misplaced AMBITION, it is a different kettle of fish.

    This answers all the Chinese posts.

    Nothing happen in China is a farce.

    It is reality, and one can pull wool if you want to!

    Also try the other threads

    http://defenceforumindia.com/forum/china/39989-china-calls-u-s-diplomat-over-south-china-sea.html

    http://defenceforumindia.com/forum/china/40098-xinjiang-china-s-second-tibet.html

    http://defenceforumindia.com/forum/china/40097-commitment-contract-xinjiang-muslims.html

    http://defenceforumindia.com/forum/china/40094-chinas-rush-into-modernisation.html

    http://defenceforumindia.com/forum/china/40089-chinas-food-storage-woes.html

    You must.

    we value your views!
     
    Last edited: Aug 7, 2012
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  8. tony4562

    tony4562 Tihar Jail Banned

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    I don't worry about India, nor do I worry about China. In case of the former, there isn't really much hope and worse than now it probaby also won't become. As indians are generally optimstic (usually misplaced) and not really that demanding in terms of material life, they will manage. In case of China, China has come a long way, but as billion people nation, I just don't see any real chance for China to catch up on the west (US, Japan or Europe) in overall terms. The coastal region where 400-500 million live has now reached more or less east european living standard, but to go further up will be difficult, and it will be equally difficult to duplicate the success in the vast inland. Chinese may not be very spiritual (in fact never in the history), but family bonds are strong and chinese folks are hard working, in the end they will manage to survive too.

    In the end for both countries there is no escape from over population, no escape from worsening environmental problems.
     
  9. no smoking

    no smoking Senior Member Senior Member

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    Clearly, you failed to understand this article!

    It is not really about the so called "decline" of job market or social unrest. What this Chinese author talks is the new supply-demand contradicitons in job market:

    1. Chinese eduction department's reform is not quick enough to make its product-new graduate to cope with industries' new requirement in skill and working ethic.
    2. Chinese industries didn't realise that their employment policies and human resources managment are not longer suitable for the current job market.
     
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  10. Armand2REP

    Armand2REP CHINI EXPERT Veteran Member

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    China’s college grads out-earned by migrant workers

    A majority of China’s college graduates earn less than migrant workers, according to a new study from Tsinghua University.

    The university’s China Data Center reported that 69 percent of this year’s university graduates earn less than 2,000 yuan (US$314) every month.

    Meanwhile, the average migrant worker takes in a monthly pay of 2,049 yuan, according to the National Bureau of Statistics.

    But some graduates’ disappointing salaries may be the envy of many former classmates.

    By the end of June, 58 percent of China’s class of 2012 had not yet found a job, according to a survey by the education research company MyCOS.

    “The job market for graduates is the worst since 2009,” said Jennifer Feng, chief human resources expert at 51job Inc., a Shanghai-based online recruiter.

    Feng told Businessweek that 20 to 30 percent of graduates may not find jobs before the end of the year.

    Graduate unemployment stood at 22 percent in 2011, according to Premier Wen Jiabao’s report to the National People’s Congress in March.

    China will have a record 6.8 million new graduates in 2012, up from 6.6 million in 2011.

    Student numbers at China’s universities have grown rapidly in recent years, leading to a excess of graduates entering a job market that has yet to accommodate their rising numbers. Meanwhile, a shortage of unskilled labor has brought a growing need to fill blue-collar jobs.

    The labor shortage has contributed to migrant workers’ rising wages, which increased an average of 359 yuan in 2011, a 21 percent increase from the previous year.

    China’s government has promised to increase efforts to help graduates find employment. The official Xinhua News Agency reported this week that jobless graduates will be required to register with local employment agencies to help facilitate job placement.

    “Employment support policies should be fully implemented with entrepreneurial incentives, social security benefits for micro-enterprising, vocational training subsidies, living allowances for internships and job and social security subsidies for people experiencing employment difficulties,” said Xin Changxing, Vice Minister of Human Resources and Social Security.

    However officials warn that job search prospects are unlikely to improve in the near future.

    “Currently and in the future, China’s employment situation will become more complex and more severe,” Premier Wen Jiabao told the China Securities Journal.

    “The task of promoting full employment will be very heavy and we must make greater efforts to achieve it,” he added.

    China’s college grads out-earned by migrant workers | Asia News – Politics, Media, Education | Asian Correspondent
     
  11. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    It appears that you have not understood the post.

    I have understood the article.

    The post contained my own comments flowing out of the content.
     
  12. tony4562

    tony4562 Tihar Jail Banned

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    Young people world over are having it tough. The youth unemployment rate is hovering well above 20% in France, for example. And in spain and greece 1 out of every 2 youth is out of job.
    [​IMG]
     
  13. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    Correct.

    But China's economy is soaring and so the problem should be less, if not, totally non existent.

    Or are you saying that China is in a slump?
     
  14. no smoking

    no smoking Senior Member Senior Member

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    Yes, I read your comment. And your comment is totally lost the point which raised by the article.

    The article is not worring about the decline of chinese labor supply (which is never worried by Chinese elite). Instead it is analysis the trend of job market and the new labors.
    More importantly, it is pointing out how to improve it.
     

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