China's Advanced Sciences and Technologies

Discussion in 'China' started by cir, Aug 17, 2011.

  1. cir

    cir Senior Member Senior Member

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    Scientists in China detect neutrino hoping to solve antimatter mystery

    English.news.cn 2011-08-15 22:42:50 FeedbackPrintRSS

    BEIJING, Aug. 15 (Xinhua) -- Scientists in a lab with Daya Bay Nuclear Power Station in southern Guangdong Province have found neutrino through two detecting instruments, which is likely to provide clues to solving the mystery of why there is more matter than antimatter in the universe.

    The Institute of High Energy Physics with the Chinese Academy of Sciences on Monday announced the breakthrough that was achieved by more than 250 researchers from six countries and regions.

    The two neutrino detectors are installed underground 360 meters away from the nuclear plant at a depth of 100 meters.

    Scientists believe that matter and antimatter were created in equal amounts during the Big Bang, but the disappearance of antimatter remains a mystery.

    Neutrino is an elementary particle that is able to pass through ordinary matter almost unaffected, which makes it extremely difficult to detect.

    Located in Shenzhen, a city neighboring Hong Kong, the Daya Bay Nuclear Power Station commenced operation in 1993.

    Scientists from the Chinese Academy of Sciences and the U.S.-based Brookhaven National Laboratory and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory started the underground neutrino experiment in 2006.

    Kam-Biu Luk, spokesman for the laboratory, said that the results of the experiment would further shed light on the evolution of basic matter after the Big Bang.

    The neutrino experiment in the Daya Bay is one of the largest cooperation projects with regards to basic research between China and the United States.

    Among the participants of the experiment are Russia, Czech Republic, and China's Hong Kong and Taiwan regions.

    Scientists in China detect neutrino hoping to solve antimatter mystery
     
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  3. cir

    cir Senior Member Senior Member

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    Chinese Scientists Invent Real Harry Potter Invisibility Cloak
    By Colleen Stufflebeem

    This is brilliant!

    It’s time for the inevitable: the totally outlandish shit in Harry Potter is becoming a reality, and I’m not talking about butter beer.

    The all too popular and eminently useful invisibility cloak has crept one step further to actual creation thanks to Chinese scientists who I’m not convinced are even aware of the ‘Harry Potter’ series.

    While noting that invisibility cloaks “are still in their infancy,” Xiang Zhang tells Science Daily researchers have “built a reflective ‘carpet cloak’ out of layers of silicon oxide and silicon nitride etched in a special pattern” to approximate a crude invisibility.

    This new science beats out old invisibility cloak methods—who knew there were any?—by “bending light waves away from the bump that the objects makes, so that the cloak appears flat and smooth like a normal mirror,” instead of using the traditional microwave or infrared waves to attempt to hide objects.

    To offer a highly unqualified assumption of what they’re talking about, I believe the cloak will emit a light that is invisible—or maybe just hard to look at?—that will be able to mask whatever is underneath it. This sounds similar to undetectable pitches only dogs and dolphins can hear, making me wonder if certain creatures will be immune to witchcraft and wizardry.

    Unfortunately, the only thing the scientists have been able to cloak in invisibility thus far was a microscopic object “roughly the diameter of a red blood cell,” which, to my understanding, is already pretty invisible, especially with a cloak of any sort—be it flannel, wool, or light—draped over top of it.

    There’s hope, however, that this new technology will one day be “capable of cloaking any object underneath a reflective carpet layer.”

    Hopefully, there are also scientists around the world working on the elder wand and the resurrection stone so we can one day defeat terrorism and all be immortal.

    Chinese Scientists Invent Real Harry Potter Invisibility Cloak | Death and Taxes
     
  4. debasree

    debasree Regular Member

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    so what do u want to prove?
     
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  5. redragon

    redragon Regular Member

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    Do you mean all those posts re indian technology were to prove something?
     
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  6. cw2005

    cw2005 Regular Member

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    This is an India Forum. When Indian post Indian technology here is sharing information. Showing achievment of China would draw mixed feeling.
     
  7. redragon

    redragon Regular Member

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    Not sure why you have a China and Pakistan defence sector here though, Chinese members are contributing to support the idea of owners of this forum. If you have a mixed feeling, go complain to the owners, see if they can close this sub-forum. Your feeling is not what concerns Chinese members when we are sharing info
     
    Last edited: Aug 18, 2011
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  8. cir

    cir Senior Member Senior Member

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    China Debuts a Drone at Robotics Show
    By NATHAN HODGE
    AUGUST 18, 2011

    China made its debut this week at the world's largest robotics trade show when a Shenzhen-based firm showcased its F50, a small drone with a high-definition video camera that a company brochure billed as a tool for monitoring protests, or responding to building fires.

    [​IMG]
    AEE Technology's F50 drone was shown at the world's largest robotics trade show in Washington on Tuesday. (Credit: Charlie Shoemaker for The Wall Street Journal)

    The appearance of AEE Technology Co.'s relatively small, short-range drone—about the size of a pizza pan—in the drone market underscores the burgeoning international competition in the market for unmanned aerial vehicles and military robots.

    State-run and private Chinese companies have invested heavily in recent years in developing drones both for export and for China's military and domestic security needs.

    Western defense officials and experts were taken by surprise in November, when at least 25 Chinese drone models were on display at an air show in south China. Several models were also shown at an exhibition of police and antiterrorism equipment in Beijing in May.

    "The market for military robotics has gone global, and China is looking to be a major producer and exporter in that market, just like the U.S.," said P.W. Singer, the author of "Wired for War," a book about the revolution in military robotics.

    China's investment in new military technology, including the recent launch of an aircraft carrier and the development of a stealth jet, has prompted concern in U.S. military circles. Military analysts have suggested that China is focused on capabilities that could threaten U.S. military vessels in a confrontation over Taiwan. The most recent Defense Department report to Congress on China's military capabilities notes Beijing's push to develop longer-range unmanned aircraft, including armed drones, "expands China's options for long-range reconnaissance and strike."

    But AEE's information brochure—which shows an overhead image of protesters hemmed in by riot police, as well as a building on fire—suggests a similarly strong interest in domestic security.

    AEE was the first Chinese company to exhibit its wares at Unmanned Systems North America, an annual exposition in Washington that features robotic hardware from around the world. In a small booth on the edge of the showroom floor, Wendy Wei, the firm's overseas sales department manager, said the company was looking to drum up international sales—and potential orders from military and police customers.

    "We had a customer yesterday who wants to use it to survey ground for the mining industry," she said. "Anywhere you need someone to do detecting or you need to take videos in a place that human beings cannot go you can use it, so it's a huge market actually."

    Michael O'Hanlon, a defense expert at the Brookings Institution in Washington, said China's interest in developing unmanned aircraft as a tool for policing crowds or responding to emergencies was "totally understandable, and legitimate."

    Broadly speaking, Mr. O'Hanlon said China lagged behind the U.S. in conventional military power, but added that China was "quick in reacting to opportunities, particularly in the smaller weapons areas."

    While China's progress on military drones is of concern to the U.S. and Israel and could worry China's neighbors, its development of drones such as AEE's F50 could also have implications for other countries that have sought to acquire drones not just for military purposes but for police surveillance and antiterrorist operations.

    The U.S. currently dominates the robotics industry and has made drones a centerpiece of its military arsenal. That its drone technology far outstrips that of its rivals was underscored by other equipment on display at the show, such as the A160 Hummingbird, a full-sized robotic helicopter developed by Boeing Co., or a self-driving seven-ton truck being developed by Oshkosh Corp. unit Oshkosh Defense.

    In April, a small robot made by U.S.-based iRobot Corp. was used to explore a reactor building at Japan's crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant. A Global Hawk, a high-flying pilotless spyplane made by Northrop Grumman Corp., was used to survey the damage above the plant. In Libya, the U.S. military has sent armed Predator drones, made by General Atomics Aeronautical Systems Inc., to strike targets in Libya.

    As competition heats up, U.S. defense executives are increasingly complaining that export controls are making it harder to compete internationally. In a keynote address at the convention Wednesday, Wes Bush, Northrop's CEO, complained that the U.S. export-control regime, which treats unmanned aircraft as extremely sensitive military hardware, made it hard to compete for global customers.

    "Today's export restrictions are hurting this industry in the U.S. without making us any safer," he said. "And they could cause the U.S. to relinquish to other nations ultimately its lead in these technologies."

    Mr. Bush compared the situation to earlier U.S. restrictions on the sale of communications satellites, which spurred other countries to develop their own technologies.

    The Obama administration last year kicked off an effort to overhaul and streamline the system that governs the export of weapons and commercial products that have a potential for military use. The initiative was billed as a way to boost the competitiveness of U.S. manufacturing and technology sectors.

    Kenneth Juergens, a vice president for Oshkosh Defense, said export restrictions made it more difficult to do business internationally, even as U.S. companies look to markets abroad to offset declining U.S. defense budgets. "We need help to get some of those barriers moved or at least streamlined so the approval process moves faster," he said.

    U.S. export controls on things like drones are also a subject of frustration for long-standing customers of U.S. military hardware. Yousef Al Otaiba, the ambassador of the United Arab Emirates to the U.S., said that unmanned aircraft were a "very, very tightly controlled technology" that was pushing countries to develop their own domestic technology...."

    China Debuts a Drone at Robotics Show - WSJ.com
     
  9. cir

    cir Senior Member Senior Member

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    China and the rise of the driverless car
    Written by Harry Fairhead
    Thursday, 11 August 2011 13:52

    While Google makes headlines with its driverless car and even manages to lobby Nevada to legalize driverless cars on the public road - China quietly pushes ahead on its own.

    China Daily reports that on the 14th of July a Hongqui HQ3 travelled 286km in three hours 20 minutes without a driver at the wheel on an expressway linking Changsha and Wuhan, the capitals of Hunan and Hubei provinces.


    [​IMG]
    A Hongqi HQ3 of the type used in the project

    The project is being developed by the National University of Defense Technology.

    One of the research team is reported as saying:

    "We only set a maximum speed and then left everything to the car itself. It knew the speed limits, traffic patterns, lane changes and roads using video cameras and radar sensors to detect other cars. It was all controlled by a command center in the trunk."

    Technical details are limited but it is claimed that GPS wasn't used to navigate the car and it relied on its sensors not only to stay on the road but to work out which road to stay on. Unlike Google's the Chinese driverless car uses computer vision to navigate aided by laser range finders. As a result it cannot drive and night and so the entire journey had to be completed during daylight. It also encountered some problems with fog and indistinct road markings. It could be argued that relying on computer vision is a more sophisticated approach than using GPS and laser range finders but without more information it is difficult to be sure. As well as just driving in a single lane the car overtook other cars a reported 67 times at an average of 87km/h.

    [​IMG]

    Although no reason for building the driverless car has been given the statistics stress that "its" reaction times are around 40ms compared to 500ms for a human and so safety seems to be a concern. However Google's car has logged 140,000 miles with only two minor accidents to its name and one of those was caused by a human driver. It will take some effort to match this performance.

    China is late into the driverless car race and members of the team are aware of the doubt that surrounds the project because of the speed that they have been able to ... well.. it has to be said.. get up to speed.

    "Some foreign experts asked me directly whether the artificial intelligence system was really developed with our own proprietary technologies, while some humorously asked where the three tiny robots in charge of the accelerator, brakes and direction hid in the car!"

    The project isn't over and now they are co-operating with China's First Auto Works to produce an even better and perhaps commercial version."

    China and the rise of the driverless car
     
  10. cir

    cir Senior Member Senior Member

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    Scientists develop robot that walks on water
    By Chris Jablonski | July 27, 2011, 11:13am PDT

    Walking on water is a way of life for some aquatic insects such as water striders. The tiny hairs on their long legs provide both a hydrophobic (water-repellent) surface as well as a large surface area to spread their weight across as they scoot over ponds, lakes and other waterways at mind-boggling speeds.

    This remarkable ability has now been replicated in machine insects. Chinese scientists report that they’ve developed an aquatic microrobot that mimics the water-walking abilities of water striders.


    [​IMG]
    The bionic microbot that mimics the water walking abilities of the water strider


    The robot insect is faster, more agile and cheaper to fabricate compared to previous designs, making it a prime candidate for military spy missions, water pollution/supply monitoring, and other applications, the scientists say.

    The robot has a body about the size of a quarter and is outfitted with ten superhydrophobic wire legs, and two movable, oar-like legs that are propelled by two miniature DC motors.

    According to a study appearing in the journal, ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces, “The microrobot could not only stand effortlessly but also walk and turn freely on the water surface, exhibiting an interesting motion characteristic.” View the video (.avi).

    “Because the weight of the microrobot is equal to that of about 390 water striders, one might expect that it will sink quickly when placed on the water surface,” the report noted. Instead, the mechanical creature stands effortlessly on water surfaces and also walks and turns freely.

    The study was funded by the Harbin Institute of Technology and Natural Science Foundation of China.

    http://www.zdnet.com/blog/emergingtech/sci...s-on-water/2667
     
  11. cir

    cir Senior Member Senior Member

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    Diamond Particles Found in Candlelight
    By Anissa Haddadi | August 18, 2011 8:53 AM GMT

    Researchers from the University of St Andrews have discovered about 1.5 million tiny diamond nanoparticles are created in a candle flame every second it burns.

    A study led by Professor Wuzong Zhou, which was published in the Chemical Communications journal, also says there is evidence diamonds was also discovered in tests on natural gas and wood flames.


    [​IMG]


    According to Professor Zhou, if scientists find a technique that will enable them to extract the particles, it could lead to new methods of manufacturing diamonds at a lower price.

    Previous research had shown that hydrocarbon molecules at the bottom of candle flames are converted into carbon dioxide by the time they reach the top, but it was not known exactly what happens in between.

    In order to remove the particle from the centre of the flame, Prof Zhou used a new sampling technique which enabled him to discover that it contained all four known forms of carbon, including diamond.

    "Unfortunately the diamond particles are burned away in the process, and converted into carbon dioxide, but this will change the way we view a candle flame forever." Zhou said.

    "My research shows that it is possible to see diamonds in flame, but this also gives us a chance to think about whether diamonds can be formed in a different way," he added.

    The first candle is said to have been invented in China more than 2,000 years ago.

    Diamond Particles Found in Candlelight - International Business Times
     
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  12. Godless-Kafir

    Godless-Kafir DFI Buddha Senior Member

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    Good i like this thread, add more please.
     
  13. cir

    cir Senior Member Senior Member

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    Scientists in China find link between common virus and high blood pressure

    Discovery gives doctors hope for developing vaccine to treat, prevent hypertension

    Agence France-Presse August 16, 2011

    High blood pressure could be caused by a common virus, according to a study carried out by a team of Chinese doctors which could lead to better treatment for millions of people around the world.

    The team from Beijing Chaoyang Hospital's cardiology centre says it has found the first evidence of a link between the human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) and the most commonly occurring form of hypertension, or high blood pressure.

    The virus infects most people at some time during their lives, but frequently causes no symptoms, so goes undetected.

    One of the report's authors, Yang Xinchun, told AFP the findings could eventually lead to the development of a vaccine to control or prevent high blood pressure.

    "If we can get conclusive evidence of the relationship, we can get better medical vaccines and remedies for hypertension," said Yang, head of the cardiology centre.

    However, he added that it was "too early" to say when a vaccine could be available and his research was still in its early stages.

    "It is the first time someone managed to find this relationship ... so we need to undergo more tests with a wider scope of patients," he said.

    The study could have widespread health implications - the World Health Organization says around a billion people worldwide suffer from high blood pressure, including more than 200 million Chinese.

    The vast majority experience so-called essential hypertension, which has no proven cause, but has been previously associated with genetic factors and unhealthy lifestyles.

    Chinese doctors believe that variety is linked to the HCMV virus.

    The results of their study were published in the U.S. medical journal Circulation, whose former chief editor James Willerson posted comments on Beijing Chaoyang Hospital's website.

    The findings "might present a new strategy for preventing and treating cardiovascular disease," he said.

    A recent study led by Jiang He, a professor at the Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine in New Orleans, found that high blood pressure plays a part in 2.3 million cardiovascular deaths in China each year.

    Of these 1.3 million were "premature" deaths, meaning they occurred before the age of 72 in men and 75 in women, the average life expectancy in China in 2005.

    "Increased blood pressure is the leading preventable risk factor for premature mortality in the Chinese general population," the authors said, describing their findings as "striking and unexpected."


    Read more: Scientists in China find link between common virus and high blood pressure
     
  14. cir

    cir Senior Member Senior Member

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    A Radical Kind of Reactor

    http://www.nytimes.com/2011/03/25/business...5chinanuke.html

    "A Radical Kind of Reactor
    By KEITH BRADSHER
    Published: March 24, 2011

    [​IMG]
    Dr. Xu Yuanhui of Chinergy with one of the "pebbles" or fuel elements that power the reactor.
    (Photo credit: Shiho Fukada for The New York Times)


    SHIDAO, China — While engineers at Japan’s stricken nuclear power plant struggle to keep its uranium fuel rods from melting down, engineers in China are building a radically different type of reactor that some experts say offers a safer nuclear alternative.

    The technology will be used in two reactors here on a peninsula jutting into the Yellow Sea, where the Chinese government is expected to let construction proceed even as the world debates the wisdom of nuclear power.

    Rather than using conventional fuel rod assemblies of the sort leaking radiation in Japan, each packed with nearly 400 pounds of uranium, the Chinese reactors will use hundreds of thousands of billiard-ball-size fuel elements, each cloaked in its own protective layer of graphite.

    The coating moderates the pace of nuclear reactions and is meant to ensure that if the plant had to be shut down in an emergency, the reaction would slowly stop on its own and not lead to a meltdown.

    The reactors will also be cooled by nonexplosive helium gas instead of depending on a steady source of water — a critical problem with the damaged reactors at Japan’s Fukushima Daiichi power plant. And unlike those reactors, the Chinese reactors are designed to gradually dissipate heat on their own, even if coolant is lost.

    If the new plants here prove viable, China plans to build dozens more of them in coming years.

    The technology under construction here, known as a pebble-bed reactor, is not new. Germany, South Africa and the United States have all experimented with it, before abandoning it over technical problems or a lack of financing.

    But as in many other areas of alternative energy, including solar panels and wind turbines, China is now taking the lead in actually building the next-generation technology. The government has paid for all of the research and development costs for the two pebble-bed reactors being built here, and will cover 30 percent of the construction costs.

    Despite Japan’s crisis, China still plans to build as many as 50 nuclear reactors over the next five years — more than the rest of the world combined. Most of this next wave will be of more conventional designs.

    But if the pebble-bed approach works as advertised, and proves cost effective, China hopes it can eventually adopt the technology on a broad scale to make nuclear power safer and more feasible as it deals with the world’s fastest growing economy and the material expectations of its 1.3 billion people.

    [​IMG]

    Western environmentalists are divided on the safety of pebble-bed nuclear technology.

    Thomas B. Cochran, the senior scientist on nuclear power for the Natural Resources Defense Council, an American group, said that such reactors would probably be less dangerous than current nuclear plants, and might be better for the environment than coal-fired plants.

    “Over all, in terms of design,” he said, “it would appear to be safer, with the following caveat: the safety of any nuclear plant is not just a function of the design but also of the safety culture of the plant.”

    The executives overseeing construction of the new Chinese reactors say that engineers are already being trained to oversee the extensively computerized controls for the plant, using a simulator at a test reactor that has been operating for a decade near Beijing, apparently without mishap.

    [​IMG]
    Engineers have been trained to oversee the controls on a test pebble-bed reactor that has been operating for a decade near Beijing.
    (Photo credit: Shiho Fukada for The New York Times)


    [​IMG]
    Students look at an experimental reactor project built at Tsinghua University, north of Beijing.
    (Photo credit: Shiho Fukada for The New York Times)


    But Greenpeace, the international environmentalist group, opposes pebble-bed nuclear reactors, questioning whether any nuclear technology can be truly safe. Wrapping the uranium fuel in graphite greatly increases the volume of radioactive waste eventually requiring disposal, said Heinz Smital, a Greenpeace nuclear technology specialist in Germany.

    But he said the waste is far less radioactive per ton than spent uranium fuel rods — one of the big sources of trouble at the Fukushima Daiichi plant.

    China is building a repository for high-level nuclear waste, like conventional fuel rods, in the country’s arid west. But the far less radioactive spheres, or pebbles, like those from the Shidao reactors will not require such specialized storage; China plans to store the used pebbles initially at the power plants, and later at lower-level radioactive waste disposal sites near the reactors.

    Whatever fears the rest of the world may have about China’s nuclear ambitions, the environmental cost-benefit analysis contains at least one potential positive: More nukes would let China reduce the heavy reliance on coal and other fossil fuels that now make it the world’s biggest emitter of global-warming gases.

    “China epitomizes the stark choices that we face globally in moving away from current forms of coal-based electricity,” said Jonathan Sinton, the top China specialist at the International Energy Agency in Paris. “Nuclear is an essential alternative” to coal, he said. “It’s the only one that can provide the same quality of electricity at a similar scale in the medium and long term.”

    Chinese leaders have been largely unwilling to engage in the global debate on climate change. But they have made a priority of reducing urban air pollution — which kills thousands of people every year and is largely caused by burning coal — and of improving mine safety. Coal mining accidents killed more than 2,400 people in China last year alone.

    China’s biggest electric company, the state-owned Huaneng Group, now aims to prove that the technology can work on a commercial scale by building the two pebble-bed reactors — each capable of meeting the residential power needs of an American city of 75,000 to 100,000 people. The reactors are expected to go into operation in about four years.

    The plants’ foundations have already been laid, their steel reinforcing bars pointing skyward, on a desolate landscape dominated by thatch-roofed huts and last season’s cornfields. Chinese safety regulations require that all nuclear plants be located at least 30 miles from the nearest city, in this case Rongcheng, which has a population of one million.

    It was only three days after a tsunami swamped Japan’s Fukushima Daiichi plant that China’s legislature approved its five-year plan calling for dozens of new nuclear reactors. As the severity of that crisis became evident, Beijing said it would “temporarily suspend“ the approval of new nuclear reactors, but would allow construction to proceed at more than two dozen other nuclear projects already under way.

    By coincidence, China’s cabinet and its national energy bureau had both given final approval for the pebble-bed reactors here in Shidao in the two weeks before the earthquake, said Xu Yuanhui, the father of China’s pebble-bed nuclear program.

    China’s nuclear safety agency has met since the Japanese earthquake and reviewed the Shidao’s project plans and site preparation, and has indicated it will be the next project to receive safety clearance.

    “The conclusion is clear that it is all ready to start to pour concrete,” said Dr. Xu, a former Tsinghua University professor who is now the vice general manager of Chinergy, the contractor building the reactors here.

    Germany led the initial research into pebble-bed nuclear reactors and built its own research version in the 1960s. That reactor closed after an accident, caused by a jammed fuel pebble that released traces of radiation — coincidentally nine days after the Chernobyl accident in 1986, at a time of greatly increased worry about nuclear safety. Dr. Xu said that China, learning from the German mishap, had designed its reactors to keep the pebbles from jamming.

    South Africa tried hard until last summer to build a pebble-bed reactor but ran into serious cost overruns.

    In the United States, the federal government and companies have spent heavily on pebble-bed research. But there has been little appetite for actually building new nuclear reactors — of any sort — since the Three Mile Island accident in 1979.

    “The Chinese had a determination to build, to show the technology to work, and a commitment to get it done,” said Andrew Kadak, a Massachusetts Institute of Technology nuclear engineer specializing in pebble-bed reactors. 'In the U.S. we didn’t have, and still don’t have, the commitment.'”
     
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  15. cir

    cir Senior Member Senior Member

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    China's CKX5680 Digitally Controlled 7-axis Contour Milling Machine

    [​IMG]

    The Wuhan Heavy Industry Corp. just made a breakthrough in an 863 Project. This is the CKX5680 Digitally Controlled 7-axis Contour Milling machine. This is significant as it is specialised in building ship propellers, like this one, for aircraft carriers and submarines. They are much more precise than those 5-axis machines.
     
  16. agentperry

    agentperry Senior Member Senior Member

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    good work keep on posting... make similar thread for Indian achievement.
     
  17. cir

    cir Senior Member Senior Member

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    New maglev line to connect western Beijing
    Updated: 2011-08-19 07:55By Chen Jia (China Daily)

    BEIJING - The country's first medium-low speed maglev line using Chinese technology is scheduled to launch in Beijing before March 2013, a chief project scientist has revealed.

    "We're facing a tight timetable as we plan to try the first maglev train on the line by October 2012," Chang Wensen, China's chief project scientist for maglev technology and professor of the National University of Defense Technology, told China Daily.

    The medium-low speed S1 Line will make China only the second country, after Japan, to have such a line, said Chang, who led the research team that developed the magnetic levitation, or maglev, technology.

    As one of eight rail transit lines under construction in Beijing designed to form an urban transit network and help ease traffic gridlock, the S1 Line will extend from the western Mentougou district to Pingguoyuan subway station, the western terminal station of Line 1.

    Construction is expected to cost about 6 billion yuan ($1 billion) and be completed in 2013, according to earlier reports.

    "The maglev line will be a safe, low-noise and economical transport choice for people," Chang said, explaining that, at 65 decibels - about the level of normal conversation - it will not affect nearby residents and could save the huge expense of large-scale relocations.

    "Compared with road vehicles, the spending on repairing maglev trains will also be reduced as wear and tear by friction can be avoided," he said.

    Earlier tests also show the low speed maglev train emits almost no radiation, he said.

    "The radiation is much less than a hairdryer or an electric razor," the professor said.

    Construction on the project was slated to begin last year but was postponed several times because residents living near the proposed route raised concerns about exposure to radiation.

    Those fears surfaced in May, when the draft plan for the maglev line was released. It was reported more than 300 residents living in areas of Mentougou and in the Bisenli community, which the S1 Line will pass some 20 meters away, signed a petition opposing the line.

    Qi Fansan and other residents in Bisenli are concerned about radiation, even though tests indicated its levels will be safe.

    Qi, a senior engineer with the Beijing National Railway Research and Design Institute of Signal and Communication, said he doubts the testing standards, which are different from European standards.

    "The radiation will be there, no matter how small they said it is. Its negative impact may show in one or two decades," he said.

    Besides concerns over radiation, power consumption of the maglev line is another problem facing Chang's research team.

    Chang said the maglev line will consume about 15 percent more power than a subway or light rail service, although it produces less noise and needs less maintenance.

    Wang Mengshu, an academic at the Chinese Academy of Engineering and a professor at Beijing Jiaotong University's tunnel and underground engineering research center, said maglev trains are nothing but "transport toys".

    "It's difficult to repair and maintain the trains and rescue passengers if the train is out of order," he said in an earlier interview.

    However, Chang said the equipment design can prevent the train from rolling off the track if it breaks down.

    Otherwise, the train will travel on small hydraulic wheels and be taken away for repairs, he added.

    New maglev line to connect western Beijing|Nation|chinadaily.com.cn
     
  18. Godless-Kafir

    Godless-Kafir DFI Buddha Senior Member

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    He is a Chinese, why would he do that!! :D
     
  19. agentperry

    agentperry Senior Member Senior Member

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    i meant to say Indians too start one like this... we can start on oct 6 with curstjee birthday as he was the first Indian in the royal science society of England.
     
  20. cir

    cir Senior Member Senior Member

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    China joins race to build fastest supercomputer
    ANI | Aug 20, 2011, 01.57PM IST

    BEIJING: China has joined the global race to build the world's fastest supercomputer in 2020.

    "China is preparing to work on a supercomputer with a capacity of 100 petaflops by 2015 and try to produce the first exascale computer in 2020," the China Daily quoted the Tianhe-1A supercomputer's Deputy Chief Designer, Hu Qingfeng, as saying.

    "We have kicked off the research of some core technologies and manpower cultivation for the plan," he added.

    Chinese scientists are attempting to produce Exascale computing, which means generating computing beyond the current petascale. If achieved, it will represent a thousandfold increase on that scale.

    The challenges confronting the technique include the performance of central processing unit (CPU), interconnection network, programming, energy management and system fault tolerance, he said.

    The challenges in developing supercomputers include technology breakthroughs and the promotion among users who usually prefer the old systems they are used to operating, Tianhe team member Lu Yutong said.

    "In a move to promote supercomputers' application among users, we need to better understand their practical demand," she said.

    The Tianhe-1A supercomputer has won positive feedback from about 100 users in varied fields such as seismic science, meteorology, medicine, commercial design, construction and manufacturing.

    The next target for the Tianhe-1A team is to build a machine that can perform tens of petaflops per second, as well as developing new CPUs and graphics processing units ( GPUs).

    China joins race to build fastest supercomputer - The Times of India
     
  21. cir

    cir Senior Member Senior Member

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    Chinese scientists develop technology that cleans water and generates power
    August 20, 2011
    by Susan Wilson

    Scientists at Shanghai Jiao Tong University have developed a photocatalytic fuel cell that cleans waste water and generates electricity. Can’t beat a two for one deal!

    According to The Royal Society of Chemistry Yanbiao Liu and fellow scientists developed the photocatalytic fuel cells using a “TiO2-nanotube-array (TNA) anode and a platinum-based cathode. Light causes the organic compounds in waste water to breakdown resulting in chemical energy that is transformed into electrical energy at the platinum cathode.

    The team used the cell to clear aromatics, azo dyes, pharmaceuticals, personal care products and endocrine-disrupting compounds from wastewater samples. They found that all of these compounds were degraded by the cell to generate energy.

    In other words, the fuel cell cleans waste water while producing electricity similar to a process developed at Oregon State University.

    Oregon State uses microbial cells rather than light to breakdown sewage. Scientists there found that a gold coating on graphite anodes produced the most energy with their system but they were still experimenting with different coatings for the anode.

    Both of these systems could conceivably be used at waste treatment plants. While cleaning the water they would also be providing the energy needed to run the waste water treatment plant. Engineer Frank Chaplen, an associate professor of biological and ecological engineering at Oregon State University had this to say:

    "Five percent of the nation’s electricity is currently used to treat water or waste water so anything we can do to reuse electricity demand and reduce our dependence of foreign oil would be a good thing."

    Various companies are already using a system that cleans up waste water while also providing energy. A biodigester is used at Ben & Jerry’s ice cream plant in the Netherlands. The biodigester turns fat and other organic waste in the discarded water into biogas that is then used to make ice cream.

    A variety of breweries are also using different methods to clean up their waste water and a few have found ways of generating different forms of energy while doing so. For example, Anheuser-Busch has a bio-energy recovery system (BERS) that produces methane gas. The methane gas is used by the brewery and the cleaner waste water uses less energy to clean at the waste water plant.

    New Belgium brewery also uses its waste water to produce energy. In a similar process to Anheuser-Busch, New Belgium uses aerobic and anaerobic microbes to clean up the waste water. The process also produces methane gas that is used at the plant.

    While the breweries and other companies use different methods to clean up their water and generate energy it isn’t as efficient as what the scientists in China or at Oregon State are developing. The current biodigester or BERS system produces cleaner water and a portion of the energy needed to run the plants. The more advanced systems actually use the organic waste to power what is essentially a fuel cell or battery. The water is much cleaner and a great deal more energy is generated.

    Hopefully both systems will be optimized quickly so that municipalities can start implementing them. As Chaplen said, we can reduce our national energy consumption simply by using systems like these.

    Chinese scientists develop technology that cleans water and generates power - GREEN.BLORGE.com
     

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