China upbeat on growth, India lags behind

Discussion in 'China' started by rockdog, Dec 7, 2012.

  1. rockdog

    rockdog Regular Member

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    China upbeat on growth, India lags behind - Oneindia News

    New Delhi, Dec 6: While India lowers its economic growth, China is showing bullishness and gearing up for 8.2 percent in 2013 from an expected 7.7 percent this year.

    Indian economy is likely to grow by 6.5 percent in 2013 and by 2014, it will be 7.2 percent, which is less that the current growth rate of China.

    China's annual economic growth dipped to 7.4 percent in the third quarter, slowing for seven quarters in a row and leaving the economy on course for its weakest showing since 1999.

    The impetus to rebirth is being echoed by the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences. The CASS said on Wednesday in its report on the economy that Beijing should intensify proactive fiscal policy.


    China is yet to issue an official GDP forecast for 2013. However, as CASS is the premier state-backed centre for academic and policy research, its line of thinking is a reflection of the government thinking.

    "We are cautiously optimistic on the outlook for 2013. We should be alert to possible downside risk and be prepared with enough policies," said the think-tank.

    CASS's recommendations are in line with the central leadership's plans to make its macro-economic policies more targetted next year, including allowing more market-determined pricing of resource products and expanding value-added tax reforms.


    Why China will achieve its target? China plans to maintain controls over the important real estate sector while allowing reform of state firms. This emphatic statement was made none other than the head of the ruling Communist Party Xi Jinping on Tuesday.


    Whereas in India, the real estate sector is most disorganised and generates very little interest from the government, except for bouts of concessions. It is very important to have regulated real estate market in order to curb speculation in land prices and deprive the middle class of a decent shelter in their lifetime.


    Even the issue of reforms in state-owned manufacturing units is holding the Indian economy and wasting precious resources. Very few state undertakings can claim to have made working profit, both in cash and social welfare.


    "While allowing FDI in retail, the Goods and Services Tax, direct cash transfer of subsidies, and dedicated freight corridor will help, we believe further reforms on fiscal consolidation, financial liberalisation and infrastructure growth will be needed to sustain an improvement in trend growth," a recent report by Goldman Sachs said on Indian economy.

    Even the issue of reforms in state-owned manufacturing units is holding the Indian economy and wasting precious resources. Very few state undertakings can claim to have made working profit, both in cash and social welfare.


    "While allowing FDI in retail, the Goods and Services Tax, direct cash transfer of subsidies, and dedicated freight corridor will help, we believe further reforms on fiscal consolidation, financial liberalisation and infrastructure growth will be needed to sustain an improvement in trend growth," a recent report by Goldman Sachs said on Indian economy.

    However, China has been working to revamp its outmoded tax regime and help reduce costs for business. It launched a trial tax reform in Shanghai a year ago to replace a business tax with a value-added tax for firms in the transportation and service industries. More cities and provinces have adopted the reform measure this year.


    There are signs of economic revival in the world's second-largest economy, with two purchasing managers' index surveys earlier this week showing the pace of growth in the manufacturing sector has quickened.


    Will Indian politicians shed their rhetoric and get into action mode to lift the country?

    Read more at: China upbeat on growth, India lags behind - Oneindia News
     
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  3. ShabiKB

    ShabiKB Tihar Jail Banned

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    This is just a western agenda, China and India are not in the same league, why always compare this two countries.
    India is not doing that bad in its league, why bash India?
     
  4. ShabiKB

    ShabiKB Tihar Jail Banned

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    with an inflation rate more than 7% and debt-GDP ratio more than 91%, if Indian cannot maintain a growth of an average 8%, it is actually regressing instead of developing, and you have seen their "growth".
     
  5. mikhail

    mikhail Senior Member Senior Member

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    yeah we are regressing instead of growing and the chinis are the no.1 economic power in the world:toilet:!so what!our economy is around 2 trillion dollars!we are the 8th largest economy in the world and we'll the the 3rd largest economy by 2025:thumb:!we are quite happy with our annual growth and i think we will again catch up with that magic figure(read:_above 8%) growth by 2015!so ciao mate!
     
  6. ShabiKB

    ShabiKB Tihar Jail Banned

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    1.85 T Name GDP growth (by PPP?), you do the math by yourself, deducted with rupee to dollar appreciation and your 7.4 domestic inflation, how much do you left.
    you can keep the debt as your own money.
     
  7. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    China has legitimate reasons to be upbeat.

    Good luck to them!

    India should learn from China and their Laogai system to boost the economy.
     
  8. ShabiKB

    ShabiKB Tihar Jail Banned

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    With this being said, China actually prefers to see a more prosperous India, the European market is sort of shrinking, we need to keep our exportation going, india can be a future market if its income surpassed 3000 dollars per capita, meanwhile, India also needs China to provide comparatively low cost commodities to support its 1.2 B low-income consumers, actually it is the trading with China helped India to release some pressure on CPI increasing.
     
    Last edited: Dec 8, 2012
  9. Bangalorean

    Bangalorean Stars and Ambassadors Stars and Ambassadors

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    Before pretending to be an amateur economist here and pulling statements out of your Musharraf, realize that inflation is already accounted for while specifying growth figures.

    India's growth of 8% has already accounted for inflation, as has China's growth.

    Henceforth, do some research instead of talking out of your Musharraf.
     
  10. ShabiKB

    ShabiKB Tihar Jail Banned

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    Such a shameless claim... account for what? the number I posted is your NOMINAL gdp,
    Let me take your statement as true, you deducted off your inflation, you still have a 91% debt to GDP ratio, with every dollar an Indian made he will use 91 cent to pay off his debt( interests aside).

    You have been downgraded to junk level by S&P, it is even harder for you to borrow more.

    Your exportation has halted to a bottleneck ( call centers are dying out, pharmaceutical counterfeits are facing more sanctions ),
    the main resources of your foreign exchange is overseas Indian's mail-Back, in this case, you are so Philippine, which I really think you should be put on the list of VIP instead of Indonesia, which is relying on oil exports, Even your overseas cannot
    balance your account, you have to resort to exporting more cereals to pay off due interests, with 92% of Indian consuming less than 1200 calories daily. I really don't see where your growth is.
     
    Last edited: Dec 8, 2012
  11. Bangalorean

    Bangalorean Stars and Ambassadors Stars and Ambassadors

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    ^^

    Look here you asshole, what do you mean "let me take your statement as true" - that is the truth, asshat. Have the humility to acknowledge when someone tells you something you didn't know. What the ---- is "shamess claim", you retard?

    Pharmaceutical counterfeits? You silly little smallc0ck Chinese, your shameless nation has been caught exporting drugs with "made in India" tags, and you have the guts to talk about this here!

    Can someone ban this asshole? I have no issue with most Chinese posters on this site, even with all the flaming and stuff.. but this chutiy@ is here only to make asinine statements and flame. This asshat, that Yiju-whatever, that pretend Aussie winton - I am not sure why we encourage such morons here.

    Now the sonofabitch is posting shit about calories, call centers, and all kinds of baseless crap - now I will post crap about Chinese human slavery and slave conditions, and filth and dirt in China... and so on.

    Please get rid of this bastard - he is absolutely no benefit to the forum.
     
  12. ShabiKB

    ShabiKB Tihar Jail Banned

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    Profanity made you a desperate jerk, you burst out these pile of digital waste just to show how hopeless you are. Peace out or find a shrink.
    I refuse to reason with a non reasonable.
     
  13. Bangalorean

    Bangalorean Stars and Ambassadors Stars and Ambassadors

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    You are an asshole. From the day you joined this site, you've been compelling other posters to abuse you. From the very first day.

    Even if we have heated debates with other Chinese posters like nimo, Tianshan, iceberg, no smoking, badguy, kickock, and many others - we very very rarely degenerate into abuse and filth. Ponder over why it is that way. The reason is that you have no logic in your statements, no flow, no sense. You say X, a person responds/corrects you, and you respond with Y, calling him shameless on the top of it, and talk all kinds of unrelated bullshit about pharma, calories, and crap.

    If you expect not to be abused after that, you are an asshole anyway. You need to be booted out of here, you are absolutely no use to this forum, not even as one presenting the Chinese counter-view.
     
  14. farhan_9909

    farhan_9909 Tihar Jail Banned

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  15. Tianshan

    Tianshan Regular Member

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    guess what his name means in chinese.
     
  16. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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  17. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    English name or the Chinese name.

    The Chinese are not proud of their names in any case and so they have an English name!
     
  18. Tianshan

    Tianshan Regular Member

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    i don't have an english name?

    who says that chinese are not proud of their names?
     
  19. Bangalorean

    Bangalorean Stars and Ambassadors Stars and Ambassadors

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    No idea - can you enlighten me...
     
  20. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    You are a rare one!

    More from that

    51 Responses to “Why Chinese Like Weird English Names”
    Brendan
    March 4, 2010 6:50 pm
    I’ve long been against the notion of having to choose another name, whether it’s Chinese people picking English names or foreigners picking Chinese names. It’s nothing to do with people picking weird names (and of course, for every Chinese student of English who calls themselves “Earthquake,” there’s at least one Brazilian student of Chinese who names himself “天王”) — rather, I just don’t see the point. If I were studying Spanish, I wouldn’t change my name to “Juan Ramon;” if I were studying Japanese, I wouldn’t pretend that I was from the 中田 family.
    Back when I was writing a Chinese newspaper column, I wrote a long, reasonably funny rant about the whole topic, and swore a mickle oath that I would never use a Chinese name, ever. I held out for a few years, but then it came time to print up business cards for a project some friends and I were working on, and I had to come up with a Chinese name for the flip-side of the card. Presented with the choice between a clumsy phonetic approximation of my name (“布兰登·奥剀恩” or something equally ugly) and a cod-Chinese name, I went with the cod-Chinese name.
    But as a last half-hearted act of protest, I opted to call myself 何毖.
    Joe
    March 4, 2010 11:08 pm
    The funny names are certainly not reserved for the Chinese. I lived in Poland for a little and met a man named ‘Kermit’. He was very proud of the name.
    A
    March 5, 2010 12:40 am
    Your note about the American with a too-authentic Chinese name has me wondering if you have any advice for 老外 trying to settle on a Chinese name (besides getting an okay from a native speaker, of course). I recently decided to change my Chinese given name (ie not surname) to something that is a little closer to my English name, and have found myself wishing for a list of characters that are appropriate for names, to help me narrow down the possibilities to a handful that have the general sounds I’m going for.
    Any thoughts on 老外 with one-character vs. two-character given names?
    Also, does anyone worry about the characters’ pronunciation in (say) 广东话 when choosing names?
    My Kafkaesque Life
    March 5, 2010 2:16 am
    I like my Chinese name 尼诺, because it sounds close to my real name, which is Nino. I’m using it since 2 years and I can’t imagine to change to something like 张明. I’m a fan of phonetic transliterations, because Chinese has a different way of pronouncing and writing Western names, so it’s best to adapt. To pick a random name is not my style, but I’m ok, if others do that. Also if Chinese pick “weird” Western name for themselves. I mean, weird and cool is highly subjective and every name has a history. Let’s just be positive about this issue.
    Carl
    March 5, 2010 8:22 am
    I’ve asked several of my students why they would name them selves “stone” or something similarly strange, but they don’t seem to care that its not a normal name. I think its a good thing that today’s youth want to express themselves more.
    k
    March 5, 2010 8:38 am
    I think Chinese people often pick names that sound strange (or, frankly, that just aren’t names: Sky, Boot, etc.) because they don’t understand what goes into the naming process in any of the places where English is spoken. Similarly, I’m pretty sure I’ve read stories about foreigners picking odd-sounding Chinese names, and I’m pretty sure it’s for the same reason. I would by no means trust myself to pick out a Chinese name that wouldn’t turn heads.
    I think we hear more about odd-sounding English names because Chinese people picking English names often do it in a vacuum of English speakers and as such their strange names stick around. On the other hand, when Westerners pick Chinese names, typically a Chinese person is around to help–also, if they’re picking a Chinese name, usually they have some kind of interest in the culture or at least the language, whereas Chinese people pick English names as a perceived convenience to English speakers they may encounter.
    Just a hypothesis….
    Big Liu
    March 5, 2010 9:19 pm
    I’ve heard of “Herbie” and “Coffee” as English names chosen by Chinese businessmen. Crazy!
    Steve C
    March 7, 2010 1:57 am
    Currently, I have students named Elite, Dolphin, and Enjoy. When I first came to Taiwan I thought these unusual English names were strange, but now I like their uniqueness.
    I asked some Taiwanese friends to help me choose my Chinese name (required by my employer, and necessary to register my scooter, etc.). I told them I didn’t want a typical “foreigner sounding” transliterated name, but I still wanted it to sound somewhat like my English name. I’m pleased with the result (孔書文), and the Taiwanese seem to find it a pleasant name.
    Joe
    March 9, 2010 4:44 am
    Indeed it’s pretty strange what funny Western names many Chinese have or use. One can only fear that they have been betrayed by bad friends being asked about the proper names. Dealing every day with Chinese people in business I came up with Ocean, Smile, England. etc.
    In earlier years I can understand that there might have been a certain need to have Western people being able to spell and memorize their names better than the Chinese, but nowadays I don’t think it would still be necessary.
    On the other hand, when learning Chinese, my teacher also gave me a Chinese name: 周. No wonder, it’s Joe as well…
    Xiao Liang
    March 9, 2010 5:46 pm
    It’s not so much weird names, but particularly chinese girls seems to really enjoy choosing English old lady names! For example:
    Dorothy, Lily, Vera, Connie, Gloria, Grace, Peggy… that’s just some from the chinesepod teachers. All very classic old lady names. Vera is my grandmother’s name! Always makes me giggle
    Jenny Zhu
    March 9, 2010 6:06 pm
    Yes, sometimes it does come down to being practical. The reason I have an English name is mostly that my Chinese name is quite unpronounceable to many foreigners. After being called ‘zuu ki’, I thought ‘Jenny’ would be better.
    Jenny Zhu
    March 9, 2010 6:07 pm
    ‘Kermit’, cute.
    Jenny Zhu
    March 9, 2010 6:10 pm
    I personally think one-character given names are more contemporary and edgier. But sometimes, it seems a bit odd to me especially when the character has no link to the person’s English name if that makes sense. But again, my English name has no link to my Chinese name at all.
    Jenny Zhu
    March 9, 2010 6:11 pm
    Well said. I am along the same line with you, although my English name has no link to my Chinese name.
    Henning
    March 10, 2010 2:46 am
    Why not?
    I like it. If you think about it – your name is the choice of your parents, made at a time way before developing your personality . And what is the point of selecting a name from a given list of names anyway – names that actually did mean something. 1000 years ago.
    I especially like “Coffee”, although I would prefer “Espresso”.
    However, if I had a daughter I would definately not allow her to name herself “Kinky”. Such a name might backfire.
    Art
    March 10, 2010 4:53 pm
    SexyBeijing:::::::::::::::[Home]
    Sexy Beijing interviewed a few Chinese a few years ago on the topic of choosing English names. It was culturally educational for me.
    草莓山
    March 14, 2010 12:38 am
    My last name is Berryhill. 10 years ago a Chinese friend gave me the name 草莓山 (Caomei Shan) = Strawberry Hill. I’ve used it every since.
    I echo Xiao Liang’s comment on the “old lady” names, although I think of them more as Victorian names. Lydia, Juliette, etc.
    Most Chinese people I work with who are under 35 years old (and live in the US) retain their Chinese name and never adopt an English name.
    Joe R.
    March 20, 2010 9:11 pm
    I was once asked by a Chinese colleague if “Seven” was considered a man’s name or a woman’s name.
    I think weird names pop up because Chinese names mean something, whereas English ones really don’t (OK they do, but no one really knows the meanings).
    jen_not_jenny
    April 16, 2010 11:17 am
    @A…yes, if you live in Southern China or spend any time around Cantonese people, you’ll want to take into consideration your Chinese name’s Canto pronunciation. My first Chinese name, given to me by my (non-native speaking) tutor was 毕金绯,which any Chinese person will tell you is already awkward enough, especially for a woman’s name. Unfortunately, the name in Cantonese is pronounced But GumFei, and this horrific but memorable name is what my ABC friend’s father calls me down to this day. He can’t for the life of him remember my English name, and even the “proper” Chinese name I chose with the help of a native speaker is eclipsed by my first, really bad, Chinese name.
    Jamil Batcha
    April 20, 2010 5:40 pm
    My Chinese name is kind of an oxymoron.
    My name in English is above (my first name is actually Arabic and last name is Indian in origin)
    What is My Chinese name? 白佳茗. A perfect name in a phonetic sense, one that flows with my name in English Jia Ming – Jamil or (even if this isn’t right) Bai Jia – Batcha. Awesome. Sweet. Cool. What have you. So what’s wrong with it?
    Well, rather than being a nice caucasian girl/lady (白 – white, 佳- good/pretty, 茗 – tender tea leaves), I’m actually an Indian dude (ok – born and bred in the US, but for the sake of appearances…). I’m sure one could guess the reaction (giggles) at restaurants and hotels when I book a table for “Mr. White” on the phone and then show up in person.
    It’s pretty funny though and I have my nicknames, so I guess I’ll leave it be.
    Xyan Minh-Cho
    April 26, 2010 12:56 pm
    I English name is Britttany, but I Russia name is Dasha. They both popular name to the culture. I wish I have different name because I met boy name Forps and I think that name is nice because nobody else will had that name.
    Мое Английское название Бретански, но мое Русское название – это Dasha. Они – об популярных названия к их культуре. Я желаю, чтобы я имел различное название , поскольку я встретил мальчика, названного Forps и я, думаю, что это – хорошее название , поскольку это уникально.
    Angelina
    May 5, 2010 9:03 am
    I went to a university in England where there were many international students from China. I met a Sugar, a Pearl (I don’t know the proper transliteration but she was from Hong Kong and her real name sounded like “Pua”?), a Sky, a few fruit names (Orange and Pear especially seemed really popular), and a Michael. These were all girls – including Michael. When the native English speakers explained why we laughed a little when they told us their English names, they all laughed too and it became something we really bonded over. We weren’t laughing at their stupidity – they weren’t stupid by any stretch of the imagination; most were students of business, law or medicine – we were laughing at cultural differences. I always found it charming to encounter another Chinese student with an unconventional name and admired their imagination in their choice. My favourite will always be Michael, though, she was such a nice girl.
    Learn Chinese Online
    May 13, 2010 1:35 pm
    This is something foreigners would also do. I have a friend from America. He gave himself a Chinese name called “周烟花”. His English name is Joe. So he use “周” as his Chinese family name and he likes fireworks very much. That’s how he got his name “烟花”. Every Chinese hear his name would wonder about it, is sounds weird.
    Troy Carter
    May 19, 2010 11:34 am
    Hey Jenny.. I miss that place to eat that you took me to. I forgot what it was called, but it was good.
    Michelle
    May 21, 2010 7:41 am
    I had a student gave himself an English name called “Turkey” and his family name was “Pan” “Turkey Pan”, another one Called “Toyota Fen”, this is more related to his Chinese name, because his Chinese name is “丰田”
    Matt
    June 4, 2010 8:24 am
    I can’t count the number of Chinese guys I have met named Tiger. Yeah, I suppose they figure there is Tiger Woods, but they really don’t get that it still isn’t a normal name. I can’t take it seriously. And then I met one named Cougar. No no no!
    I’ve met a guy called Ariel. All I could think of was Disney’s ‘The Little Mermaid’.
    I met a girl who picked the name “Hello Beef”. Her reason? She like Hello Kitty and she liked Beef. Too weird.
    Frances
    June 15, 2010 4:43 am
    I wonder whether the guy who was asking about the English name “Seven” was thinking of “Steven” (definitely a man’s name) or of Star Trek’s “Seven of Nine” (definitely a woman, and she went by Seven for short).
    If I had a student who had picked a name like “Kinki” or “Enjoy” I would have a really hard time trying to figure out a culturally tactful way to explain that those names sound like strippers’ pseudonyms and absolutely should be changed if they plan to associate with English speakers in any capacity that doesn’t involve taking their clothes off. In keeping with Jenny’s recent post about not discussing sexual matters, I’m never sure what to say to a Chinese person when those issues become important that will stay on the safe side of the line of propriety.
    Tools Freak
    August 20, 2010 5:43 am
    Wow that is an very informative article . I like your blog. Maybe you should write more articles of these type. By the way, sorry for my bad english
    Jack
    August 28, 2010 11:22 pm
    Hi Jenny, you are very right. My chinese colleagues gave themselves names like Sword !! Looks like the cultural awareness is absent…..
    .....Franch....
    October 3, 2010 2:06 am
    Is it weird if i chose “Franch”to be my English name??
    Earle Isacs
    October 11, 2010 7:29 pm
    I dont usually comment on blogs but i have to tell you well done
    Ema Nymton
    October 19, 2010 5:14 am
    Well … I really think people who are picking names in a foreign language should really know something about that language. I have a 3-year-old nephew, who has an English name of “Jackal”. It might sound catchy, but I don’t think his parents wanted to name their son after a hyena derivative. When I pointed that out, like any good uncle would do, they ended up accusing me for calling their son a dog!
    Another incident. Some really hot blond chick was walking down the street. She’s got one of those Chinese tats on her back. I think she wanted to say “Taurus” but from the translation, it meant “I am a cow.” I am sure she would have changed her mind about the tat if she got expert help, and I am sure she would have been a little more sensible than accusing someone of calling her a cow.
    Ruth English
    November 22, 2010 12:17 am
    I find that Chinese people laugh at my name because it says what I am maybe. By the way what do Chinese people like that is English and could be exported?
    Chris Hagen
    April 6, 2011 7:14 pm
    I think it is an incredible show of individuality for Chinese to take different English names or foreigners to take funny Chinese ones. It is refreshing, I hope it never stops. I know a guy named “Debt,” … I tried to get him to change it, he refused, … good on him.
    In a country that individuality has been suppressed for so long, encourage it when you can.
    Jake
    May 27, 2011 11:01 pm
    Names of some people that I have met at work in Hong Kong:
    Credy, Rainbow, Garlic, Jenniful, Apple, Friendly, Honky, Kennis, Cannie, Horna, Cream
    Rudy
    July 23, 2011 10:59 am
    ive been in china for over 3 years now and my given name is Rudy. For my business i had to choose a chinese name and my friend suggested LuDi = 鲁迪。 what do you think about this name? i often get moderate laughs when they see my chinese name and they start repeating it a couple of times…
    Jenny Zhu
    July 25, 2011 12:02 pm
    I think you have a great Chinese name! The two characters have very clean, steady and elegant connotations.Maybe that’s why Chinese are amused by it because it sounds like an authentic Chinese name.
    Jenny Zhu
    July 25, 2011 12:03 pm
    Garlic!!!
    Ya Zhuo
    August 29, 2011 12:52 am
    Hi Jenny! im going to the US to study for a year as an exchange student and I wonder if i should pick another English name for myself because my current English name is Yolanda. it sounds like an South American name or Spanish one, not that commen in America.
    Also, it seems that my original Chinese name is not that difficult to pronounce–卓娅(Ya Zhuo), but i still wonder if people wil be able to pronounce 卓(it seems like “draw” haha!)
    and… what do you guys think of the names Mia and Stevie ? Which do u think suits me more?
    Jenny Zhu
    August 29, 2011 10:41 am
    2 things jump out of me:
    1. Yolanda is really nice! It’s very authentic if you know what I mean.
    2. If you wanted to change your name, maybe “Zoe”? It sounds a bit like 卓娅.
    But I am not a native ENglish speaker either. Let’s see what others say. All the best in your exchange year!
    Darcey
    September 5, 2011 4:54 pm
    I was given a handful of Chinese names over my “studying career”, but I’ll always be partial to the first one I got: 孔 丽萍 。 I’ve had variants that are closer to my English name, but… Li Ping was always my first, and is what I prefer to use.
    Ya Zhuo – I know someone whose name is Zou Fuying (not sure what characters she uses) and she goes by “Zoey” rather than a variation of her ‘first name’. You could go for something like Zoey/Zoe (same pronunciation), or you could look at something that starts with a “Ya” sound. Or just pick something you _like_!
    themethodman
    October 14, 2011 2:09 pm
    My chinese teacher gave me the name “夏恩龙”.
    Anne
    January 6, 2012 12:17 am
    As for me, I come from Montreal in Canada, one of the very few french-speaking cities in America. Therefore, chinese people must find a francophone name and they do. I noticed that, on the contrary of english names, they do not try to find a name with a meaning but only go with the nice sonority of a name. But they often end up with old unfashionable names. I’ve known a Gloria, a Yvonne and even a Jacques which could easily be my grandparents names It makes us laugh a bit but they seem so proud of their name !… Well, maybe my chinese name, An1 Fei1 Li4 is old and funny-sounding too for all I know hehe
     
  21. Tianshan

    Tianshan Regular Member

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