China slams Japan's Abe over interview comments

Discussion in 'China' started by Ray, Feb 22, 2013.

  1. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    China slams Japan's Abe over interview comments

    China sharply criticised Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe on Friday for telling a US newspaper that Beijing had a "deeply ingrained" need to challenge its neighbours over territory.

    Abe, visiting the United States for talks with President Barack Obama, told the Washington Post in an interview published Thursday that China uses disputes with Japan and others to shore up its domestic support.

    Tensions between the Asian giants are growing over rival claims to a group of small islands in the East China Sea that the Chinese call the Diaoyus and the Japanese refer to as the Senkakus.

    Beijing is also at odds with several Southeast Asian countries, including the Philippines, over islands in the South China Sea.

    China's confrontational stance risked eventually harming its economy and scaring off foreign investors, Abe said.

    "Such behaviour is going to have an effect on their economic activity at the end of the day," the paper quoted him as saying.

    "In the case of China, teaching patriotism (is equivalent to) teaching anti-Japanese sentiment," he added.

    Beijing fired back, with foreign ministry spokesman Hong Lei saying outsiders have no right to criticise how China works.

    "Only Chinese people have the right to speak about whether China's political system and development strategy is suitable," he told a regular briefing Friday.

    "The great renaissance of the Chinese people cannot be obstructed by anyone," he added, saying that Beijing had demanded a clarification.

    Hong was earlier quoted by the state-run Global Times newspaper as saying Chinese officials were "shocked" at Abe's comments.

    "It's rare that a country's leader would brazenly distort facts, attack its neighbour and instigate confrontation among countries in the region," Hong said, according to the paper.

    The maritime dispute over the uninhabited East China Sea islands, which are administered by Japan but claimed by China and Taiwan, has simmered for decades.

    Tensions escalated last year after Tokyo nationalised those islets in the chain it did not already own.

    China responded angrily, with violent street demonstrations damaging Japanese businesses and property, and some Japanese citizens reporting being harassed and physically attacked.

    Beijing and Tokyo have both scrambled jets to ward off moves by the other side and fishing boats and government patrol ships have played cat-and-mouse in the vicinity of the islands.

    Earlier this month, Tokyo alleged that a Chinese frigate locked its weapons-targeting radar on a Japanese destroyer in what it characterised as a dangerous escalation. Beijing denied the charge.

    Abe is due to meet Obama on Friday. Japan and the United States have a security treaty and Washington stations some 47,000 troops in Japan.

    Last month Hillary Clinton, approaching the end of her term as secretary of state, said Washington does not take sides in the territorial dispute but pointedly cautioned Beijing not to challenge Japan's control over the islands.

    China's official Xinhua news agency in a commentary Friday warned the US that backing Tokyo would risk damaging ties with China, urging Washington against "being hijacked" by Japan.

    "US support for Japan on the issue would not only damage Washington's credibility as a constructive superpower, but also as an important partner of China on many pressing global issues", the commentary said.

    US backing would only encourage Japan "to take further provocative actions, which will definitely send China-Japan relations to new lows and even threaten the peace and stability in East Asia", Xinhua added.

    China slams Japan's Abe over interview comments | Bangkok Post: news

    ***********************************

    One cannot totally debunk the Japanese PM's statement.

    It could have some semblance to the reality.

    The Chinese spokesman indicates the typical Chinese party line that none can criticise China or how it works.

    Now, this is what one finds as totally infantile.

    What makes the Chinese feel that none can comment on China and how it works?

    Imagine it, an official is holding this view and not a forum poster who have the tendency to go off the rocker!

    By that logic of the Chinese spokesman, then no other country or anyone can comment on another country or how it works.

    If that were true, then how come the whole world comments on each other and their working?

    Maybe the Chinese want all to be Mauni Babas.

    Of course, if one scratches the surface, one can understand that the Communists of China are petrified of any analysis by anyone including their citizens of the workings of the Chinese Govt that is solely run by the Communists.

    That is why they have gone hell for leather against the NYT and Al Jazeera!
     
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  3. Yusuf

    Yusuf GUARDIAN Administrator

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    Look at this comment by the Chini

    "Only Chinese people have the right to speak about whether China's political system and development strategy is suitable," he told a regular briefing Friday.

    Last time they tried to speak, tanks rolled on the streets of Beijing!

    Abe has said nothing wrong. Most nations know China is an agressive country seeking more and more territory.
     
    Prometheus, W.G.Ewald and rock127 like this.
  4. Bhadra

    Bhadra Defence Professionals Defence Professionals Senior Member

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    Chinese secretly or rather openly following the great Chankya in diplomacy and foreign relations....

    Foreign relations is nothing for them but gaining back the Chinese empire.. That is what the Chinese know about.
     
  5. rock127

    rock127 Maulana Rockullah Senior Member

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    China needs to understand that NOT every country agree with their forced POV.China has become a irresponsible country by its daily threatning.

    China can impose its own rules on its own citizens by rolling tanks on them but outside China you cant enforce.
     
  6. Impluseblade

    Impluseblade Regular Member

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    Why is hiding the truth? That's Japan!

    ----------------------------------------
    The Inconvenient Truth Behind the Diaoyu/Senkaku Islands - NYTimes.com

    The Inconvenient Truth Behind the Diaoyu/Senkaku Islands

    ¶I’ve had a longstanding interest in the Diaoyu/Senkaku islands, the subject of a dangerous territorial dispute between Japan and China. The United States claims to be neutral but in effect is siding with Japan, and we could be drawn in if a war ever arose. Let me clear that I deplore the violence in the recent anti-Japan protests in China: the violence is reprehensible and makes China look like an irrational bully. China’s government should rein in this volatile nationalism rather than feed it. This is a dispute that both sides should refer to the International Court of Justice, rather than allow to boil over in the streets. That said, when I look at the underlying question of who has the best claim, I’m sympathetic to China’s position. I don’t think it is 100 percent clear, partly because China seemed to acquiesce to Japanese sovereignty between 1945 and 1970, but on balance I find the evidence for Chinese sovereignty quite compelling. The most interesting evidence is emerging from old Japanese government documents and suggests that Japan in effect stole the islands from China in 1895 as booty of war. This article by Han-Yi Shaw, a scholar from Taiwan, explores those documents. I invite any Japanese scholars to make the contrary legal case. – Nicholas Kristof

    ¶Japan’s recent purchase of the Diaoyu/Senkaku Islands has predictably reignited tensions amongst China, Japan, and Taiwan. Three months ago, when Niwa Uichiro, the Japanese ambassador to China, warned that Japan’s purchase of the islands could spark an “extremely grave crisis” between China and Japan, Tokyo Governor Ishihara Shintaro slammed Niwa as an unqualified ambassador, who “needs to learn more about the history of his own country”.

    ¶Ambassador Niwa was forced to apologize for his remarks and was recently replaced. But what is most alarming amid these developments is that despite Japan’s democratic and pluralist society, rising nationalist sentiments are sidelining moderate views and preventing rational dialogue.

    ¶The Japanese government maintains that the Diaoyu/Senkaku Islands are Japanese territory under international law and historical point of view and has repeatedly insisted that no dispute exists. Despite that the rest of the world sees a major dispute, the Japanese government continues to evade important historical facts behind its unlawful incorporation of the islands in 1895.

    Specifically, the Japanese government asserts, “From 1885 on, our government conducted on-site surveys time and again, which confirmed that the islands were uninhabited and there were no signs of control by the Qing Empire.”

    ¶My research of over 40 official Meiji period documents unearthed from the Japanese National Archives, Diplomatic Records Office, and National Institute for Defense Studies Library clearly demonstrates that the Meiji government acknowledged Chinese ownership of the islands back in 1885.

    ¶Following the first on-site survey, in 1885, the Japanese foreign minister wrote, “Chinese newspapers have been reporting rumors of our intention of occupying islands belonging to China located next to Taiwan.… At this time, if we were to publicly place national markers, this must necessarily invite China’s suspicion.…”

    ¶In November 1885, the Okinawa governor confirmed “since this matter is not unrelated to China, if problems do arise I would be in grave repentance for my responsibility”.

    ¶“Surveys of the islands are incomplete” wrote the new Okinawa governor in January of 1892. He requested that a naval ship Kaimon be sent to survey the islands, but ultimately a combination of miscommunication and bad weather made it impossible for the survey to take place.
    Letter dated May 12, 1894 affirming that the Meiji government did not repeatedly investigate the disputed islands.Japan Diplomatic Records Office.Letter dated May 12, 1894 affirming that the Meiji government did not repeatedly investigate the disputed islands.

    ¶“Ever since the islands were investigated by Okinawa police agencies back in 1885, there have been no subsequent field surveys conducted,” the Okinawa governor wrote in 1894.

    ¶After a number of Chinese defeats in the Sino-Japanese War, a report from Japan’s Home Ministry said “this matter involved negotiations with China… but the situation today is greatly different from back then.” The Meiji government, following a cabinet decision in early 1895, promptly incorporated the islands.

    ¶Negotiations with China never took place and this decision was passed during the Sino-Japanese War. It was never made public.

    ¶In his biography Koga Tatsushiro, the first Japanese citizen to lease the islands from the Meiji government, attributed Japan’s possession of the islands to “the gallant military victory of our Imperial forces.”

    ¶Collectively, these official documents leave no doubt that the Meiji government did not base its occupation of the islands following “on-site surveys time and again,” but instead annexed them as booty of war. This is the inconvenient truth that the Japanese government has conveniently evaded.

    ¶Japan asserts that neither Beijing nor Taipei objected to U.S. administration after WWII. That’s true, but what Japan does not mention is that neither Beijing nor Taipei were invited as signatories of the San Francisco Peace Treaty in 1951, from which the U.S. derived administrative rights.

    ¶When Japan annexed the Diaoyu/Senkaku Islands in 1895, it detached them from Taiwan and placed them under Okinawa Prefecture. Moreover, the Japanese name “Senkaku Islands” itself was first introduced in 1900 by academic Kuroiwa Hisashi and adopted by the Japanese government thereafter. Half a century later when Japan returned Taiwan to China, both sides adopted the 1945 administrative arrangement of Taiwan, with the Chinese unaware that the uninhabited “Senkaku Islands” were in fact the former Diaoyu Islands. This explains the belated protest from Taipei and Beijing over U.S. administration of the islands after the war.
    Report dated August 12, 1892 from navy commander affirming the islands were not fully investigated. Source: Library of The National Institute for Defense Studies.Report dated August 12, 1892 from navy commander affirming the islands were not fully investigated. Source: Library of The National Institute for Defense Studies.

    ¶The Japanese government frequently cites two documents as evidence that China did not consider the islands to be Chinese. The first is an official letter from a Chinese consul in Nagasaki dated May 20, 1920 that listed the islands as Japanese territory.

    ¶Neither Beijing nor Taipei dispute that the Diaoyu/Senkaku Islands — along with the entire island of Taiwan — were formally under Japanese occupation at the time. However, per post-WW II arrangements, Japan was required to surrender territories obtained from aggression and revert them to their pre-1895 legal status.

    ¶The second piece evidence is a Chinese map from 1958 that excludes the Senkaku Islands from Chinese territory. But the Japanese government’s partial unveiling leaves out important information from the map’s colophon: “certain national boundaries are based on maps compiled prior to the Second Sino-Japanese War(1937-1945).”

    ¶Qing period (1644-1911) records substantiate Chinese ownership of the Diaoyu/Senkaku Islands prior to 1895. Envoy documents indicate that the islands reside inside the “border that separates Chinese and foreign lands.” And according to Taiwan gazetteers, “Diaoyu Island accommodates ten or more large ships” under the jurisdiction of Kavalan, Taiwan.

    ¶The right to know is the bedrock of every democracy. The Japanese public deserves to know the other side of the story. It is the politicians who flame public sentiments under the name of national interests who pose the greatest risk, not the islands themselves.

    ¶Update: The author would like to include an updated image of the Qing era documents that recorded, “Diaoyutai Island accommodates ten or more large ships”, as mentioned in his blog post.
     
  7. no smoking

    no smoking Senior Member Senior Member

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  8. Yusuf

    Yusuf GUARDIAN Administrator

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  9. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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