China sees ‘encircle’ ploy in India ties

Discussion in 'China' started by binayak95, Jul 22, 2013.

  1. binayak95

    binayak95 Regular Member

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    China sees ‘encircle’ ploy in India ties
    Published July 22, 2013 | By admin
    SOURCE: TELEGRAPH INDIA



    Commander Zhang Zaige shows an anti-ship and anti-torpedo missile launcher on board the Weifang. Picture by Charu Sudan Kasturi

    Commander Zhang Zaige flashed the smile of a proud parent as he showed off the weapon systems on board the Weifang, the warship he captains that is one of the latest additions to the People’s Liberation Army Navy’s growing fleet.

    The 76mm anti-aircraft gun on the frigate’s deck and the missiles aimed at intercepting enemy torpedoes and targeting ships are standard. The Indian Brahmos missile has a longer range. What has changed is China’s threat perception.

    As China hardens its position on disputes with neighbours over islands and reefs in the South China Sea, the American move to pivot strategically towards the Asia-Pacific region has pushed India’s growing alliance with Japan and the US into sharp focus for Beijing and its military.

    “I believe Japan and the US are trying to contain and encircle China,” said Rear Admiral Wang Ling, Zhang’s boss and the second in command of the North Sea Fleet that includes the Weifang, commissioned just this June.

    One of China’s three navy fleets, the North Sea Fleet is based out of this port town 800km south-east of Beijing that is popular among Chinese tourists looking for a summer getaway and is the home of two of China’s best known global exports — Haier home appliances and Tsingtao beer.

    Wang was responding to a question by The Telegraph on whether he thought Japan and the US, through their alliances with India, were trying to check China’s maritime growth.

    What Wang said points to China’s growing tensions with two of its historical rivals in an ocean named after peace. What he did not mention —India — reflects Beijing’s concern: that New Delhi may get pulled into an alliance that China is convinced is ultimately aimed at containing it. It’s a concern betrayed repeatedly by Chinese officers, military officers and researchers — some subtly, others more explicitly.

    China is lodged in a tussle with many of its neighbours — the Philippines, Vietnam and Japan — over islands in the seas that connect these nations. The intensification of these tussles has coincided with the US stating its intention to pivot towards the Asia-Pacific region as a focus of its naval activities. Added to the mix is the trilateral dialogue that India, Japan and the US have held four times since 2011.

    “These are not innocent activities,” said Colonel Li Xiaolu, a PLA officer who researches on China’s strategic affairs at Beijing’s National Defense University. “The alliance between Japan, India and the US is definitely aimed at restricting China.”

    Most countries in the Asia-Pacific Rim region point to China’s increasing maritime assertiveness as the trigger for the new scramble for the seas. China’s Navy, traditionally content to focus on its territorial waters, earned itself the mandate to evolve into a bluewater force for the first time under a key decision taken at the 18th Party Congress of the Chinese Communist Party in 2012 that saw the public anointment of Xi Jinping as the country’s new leader after a once-in-decade leadership change. This new mandate means the navy can operate in the open seas.

    China has demanded that Japan give up the Diaoyu Islands — known as the Senkaku Islands in Japanese — in the East China Sea, and that Vietnam and the Philippines “return” to China islands and reefs they hold but that China insists were historically its.

    And earlier this month, Wang’s North Sea Fleet participated in joint exercises with the Russian Navy in the Japan Sea, where the ships were seen from Japanese land by locals of the northern tip of the island of Hokkaido. This was uncharted territory for the PLA Navy.

    But China is adamant that its actions are motivated purely by self-defence and a desire to protect its sovereign territories, ideally diplomatically. Listing out the key security threats faced by the country, the PLA’s latest white paper published this April says “some neighbouring countries are taking actions that complicate or exacerbate the situation” regarding China’s maritime security and sovereignty. “And Japan is making trouble over the Diaoyu Islands.”

    The white paper then goes on to talk about Japan’s definite push towards forging stronger alliances with other Asian nations, including India. “Some country has strengthened its Asia-Pacific military alliances, expanded its military presence in the region, and frequently makes the situation there tenser.”

    The Chinese ministry of foreign affairs strategic research journal — China International Studies— was even more direct in its June edition, accessed by this newspaper. Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, who triggered an uproar in China by challenging the historically documented widespread sexual abuse of Chinese women by Japanese soldiers during their occupation, is seeking Indian cooperation in encircling China, researcher Zhang Yaohua has asserted in the journal. This “cooperation” includes the first senior-level joint maritime affair dialogue between India and Japan this past January.

    “Later, Japan approved the export of ‘US-2’ seaplanes to India in order to strengthen communications with India and contain China,” the journal said, referring to amphibious planes Tokyo agreed to sell during Prime Minister Manmohan Singh’s visit to Japan in May.

    Skipping niftily up and down steep ladders inside the Weifang, a Type 54A frigate, ship captain Zhang eventually reached some of his choicest charges: missiles sheltered inside the hull, unseen from outside. At Zhang’s command, the hull will open up, and the missiles will swivel on their axis to point seawards. They will most likely point eastwards, away from India and its ships.

    But the increasing tensions in the seas around China have also injected uncertainty over the kind of missions the Weifang and its sister ships may need to embark on, and who their targets may be. Zhang is still waiting for orders. “I don’t know what mission I’ll be assigned,” he said.

    (The reporter visited China last week at the invitation of the All China Journalists’ Association)
     
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  3. W.G.Ewald

    W.G.Ewald Defence Professionals/ DFI member of 2 Defence Professionals

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    This aircraft will contain China? Strengthen communications? It doesn't seem to be that much of a threat, really.

    [​IMG]

    Editors at China International Studies seem a little paranoid.
     
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  4. binayak95

    binayak95 Regular Member

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    Those Chinese buffoons who wrote that article had no idea on the US-2 did they? :rofl: Besides who needs a Prop aircraft to strengthen communications when you've got Satellites!!
     
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  5. no smoking

    no smoking Senior Member Senior Member

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    You can't directly communicate with Japanese satelite in the potential battle field since you are using a completely different system with your own code, neither does Japanese. So here is what US-2 can provide help--building up a bridge between India and Japan navy/air force at least cost in nearest position.
     
  6. Known_Unknown

    Known_Unknown Devil's Advocate Stars and Ambassadors

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    Pot calling the kettle black. If China's decades old anti-India alliance with Pakistan didn't exist, India would have no reason to respond by working with Japan and the US (and whoever else wants to join) to contain China. I'm surprised the Chinese don't understand the Buddhist doctrine of "karma". :p
     
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  7. t_co

    t_co Senior Member Senior Member

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    This. The US-2 provides plenty of room for putting Indian and Japanese C4I equipment side by side in a mobile platform.

    Unfortunately, the US-2 is not survivable, but for the low-intensity monitoring operations that Japan is no doubt pursuing with India, they fit the job.

    The wild card here is informational security measures, which are usually always lower on a joint operation between countries. China could glean some valuable intel from the way India uses these birds.
     
  8. arnabmit

    arnabmit Homo Communis Indus Senior Member

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    Wow! you are making the US-2 out to be a pseudo satellite where as it is just a S&R platform...
     
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  9. TrueSpirit

    TrueSpirit Senior Member Senior Member

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    Forget It....Trace my IP if you can
    China already has most of intel it needs. Many of Indian govt.'s servers/databases hosting sensitive data have been thoroughly compromised on multiple occasions by attacks originating in PRC. The encryption was quite run-of-the-mill & it would not have been much of a problem to "understand" the same.

    However, I am not sure whether they were able to separate the grain from the chaff & glean meaningful info. That is, where most of the intelligence deptt. get stuck.

    Only the servers completely "off-the-grid" (as designed by NIC) have been left intact & without a physical sabotage operation, they are likely to remain so.
     
  10. nirranj

    nirranj Regular Member

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    This article is a saber rattling.. The Chinese military commanders repeatedly assert that they command a force that can take the fight to any corner of the earth, when their political brass remain silent. Not sure whether the nation is run by a CCP-Military alliance, which is really dangerous...
     
  11. W.G.Ewald

    W.G.Ewald Defence Professionals/ DFI member of 2 Defence Professionals

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    There must already be an aircraft in IAF inventory for such a role, would be my guess.
     
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  12. binayak95

    binayak95 Regular Member

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    Chinese state media frowns on ‘Indian media hype’
    Published July 23, 2013 | By admin
    SOURCE: THE HINDU



    A commentary issued by China’s official Xinhua news agency on Tuesday hit out at the Indian media for “hyping” the situation along the disputed border, following reports in recent days of new incursions by Chinese troops.

    The commentary said “sensational reports” were “harmful to the China-India relationship”, and it accused media reports of “sour[ing] to some extent the atmosphere” of Chinese Premier Li Keqiang May 2013 visit to India.

    Media reports, Xinhua added, “have only served to further sow misunderstandings between Indians and Chinese even at a time when their leaders are working hard to manage their differences and to build a constructive relationship that can benefit both sides”.

    The commentary did not, however, provide any information or details to counter any of the recent reports of incursions by Chinese troops.

    On Monday, media reports said around 50 Chinese soldiers riding on horses had intruded into the Chumar area on July 16. In April, relations were strained following a three-week stand-off in Depsang, also in the western section of the disputed border, after Chinese troops put up a tent.

    Officials in both countries have publicly played down the incidents, pointing out that as perceptions of the disputed Line of Actual Control (LAC) were differing, patrols by both sides would be seen as incursions by the other in areas where claims were overlapping. The Chinese Foreign Ministry has maintained that its troops did not venture beyond what it saw as the LAC.

    However, in recent months, changes in the patterns of Chinese patrols, in part enabled by improvements in infrastructure, have led to a number of increasingly frequent reports of incursions into what India sees as its territory and what is seen as aggressive patrolling.

    Before the Depsang incident, for instance, Chinese troops had only carried out patrols up to their claim lines and returned to their bases, and had not, in the recent past, set up a tent in a disputed area to assert their claims.

    On Tuesday, officials from India and China met in New Delhi as part of a border consultation and coordination mechanism meeting in order to improve communication and trust. Earlier this month, during Defence Minister A. K. Antony’s visit to China, both sides also agreed to increase the frequency and number of locations of border personnel meetings in order to prevent the recurrence of incidents such as the Depsang stand-off.

    Without directly referring to either Chumar or Depsang, the Xinhua commentary said it was “unwise to let isolated incidents along the border to negatively affect the promising China-India relationship”.

    “The disputes, a historical hangover, were not created in one day, neither will they be resolved overnight”, it said, adding that “fortunately, Beijing and New Delhi, with political wisdom, made joint efforts to defuse the tensions [in a] timely [manner]”. The commentary also called on both countries to boost trade ties and joint

    investments, pointing out that “despite sometimes frosty political relations, China has become one of India’s top trading partners”.
     
  13. binayak95

    binayak95 Regular Member

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    The Chinese will never understand the concept of Free Media, will they?
     
  14. no smoking

    no smoking Senior Member Senior Member

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    India lost some information for sure. But how much and how valuable is a big question unless India intellegence departments are full of shit. Hacking is not something new and India is only a victim in this game. With one of the biggiest IT talents pool, India has been in the game for quite long time.

    It's Not Just China: Indian Hacker Group Spied On Targets In Pakistan, U.S. And Europe - Forbes

    Cyber-Spying Campaign Traced Back to India: Researchers

    There are computer programs to search for "key words" and they have plenty people to read it. If they can't analyse it, why these big powers (US, China, Russia, India, etc) spent so much money on it?

    Private laptop and PCs which are linked to the servers with sensitive informations are the most vulnerable targets for hacking, not server itself.
     
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