China says to USA: 'Pakistan is our Israel'

Discussion in 'Pakistan' started by ajtr, Oct 30, 2010.

  1. ajtr

    ajtr Veteran Member Veteran Member

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    China: 'Pakistan is our Israel'

    The world's most populous country is showing more international assertiveness, which bothers the US.

    When a US delegate once confronted a Chinese diplomat about Beijing's uncompromising support for Pakistan, the Chinese reportedly responded with a heavily-loaded sarcastic remark: "Pakistan is our Israel".

    But judging by China's unrelenting support for some of its allies, including North Korea, Burma, Zimbabwe and Sudan, its protective arm around these countries is no different from the US and Western political embrace of Israel - right or wrong.

    While China is battling the West over exchange rates, import tariffs and its territorial claims in the South China Sea, Beijing is also lobbying furiously to stall a Western- inspired proposal for a Commission of Inquiry on possible war crimes by the military junta in Burma (Myanmar).

    "Such a commission should not be seen as a way to punish the government, but to prevent impunity and help prevent further abuse," says the UN Special Rapporteur on Myanmar, Tomas Ojea Quintana.

    But China, which in January 2007 exercised its veto, along with Russia, to prevent Security Council sanctions against Burma, has not shown any willingness to back the proposal - even for a watered-down commission.

    "Clearly," says one Asian diplomat, "China is trying to reassert its political clout at the United Nations as a counterweight to its defensive stand on currency and trade issues."

    The New York Times newspaper said on Tuesday that the US administration is facing a "confrontational relationship" with an assertive China and is trying to respond to "a surge of Chinese triumphalism" by strengthening Washington's relationship with Japan and South Korea.

    US President Barack Obama is planning to visit four Asian countries next month - Japan, Indonesia, India and South Korea - while bypassing China.

    Meanwhile, UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon, who needs China's support in the Security Council if he decides to run for a second term next year, is currently on his fourth trip to China, having visited the country in May and July 2008, and in July 2009.

    In recent months, China has prevented a Security Council resolution against North Korea over the sinking of a South Korean ship and also tried to suppress a UN report alleging the use of Chinese-made bullets in attacks on UN peacekeepers in Darfur, Sudan.

    "China sees value in promoting its image as the Security Council member defending the rights of the developing world, and China sees value in relying on the UN to counter US power," said Linda Jakobson, director of the programme on China and Global Security at the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute (SIPRI).

    Jakobson, an in-house China expert at SIPRI, points out that Beijing also sees value in participating in UN peacekeeping operations "both because this enhances the image of China as a responsible power but also because it gives Chinese military experience".

    Still, China relented to US and Western pressure in supporting four Security Council resolutions imposing sanctions against Iran, one of Beijing's staunchest political, economic and military allies.

    The fourth round of sanctions, all of them aimed primarily at Iran's nuclear programme, was imposed in June this year.

    Justifying his country's support for the resolution, Chinese Ambassador Li Baodong was quoted as saying that Beijing wanted to make sure that sanctions would not affect the Iranian people or its normal overseas trade.

    Jakobson said that China agreed to these sanctions after much deliberation and on the condition that the energy sector was excluded.

    "This can be seen as a compromise solution on China's part," she said. "The exclusion of the energy sector was crucial."

    Jakobson also pointed out that China wants to protect the massive investments by Chinese energy companies already in Iran or under negotiation with Tehran, and China wants to ensure that its long-term strategic plans for energy security are not threatened.

    In a detailed policy paper released last month, and titled "New Foreign Policy Actors in China", SIPRI said the increasing sway of large state-owned energy companies have an increasing influence on foreign policy deliberations in China.

    Jakobson, who co-authored the report with Dean Knox, said this is one example of that sway though it is noteworthy that there are other foreign policy actors who presumably were not inclined to advocate China's support of the resolution.

    On the other hand, she said, there were presumably actors who advocated China's support for the resolution because China supports non-proliferation and does not want to see Iran go nuclear.

    "If China had not supported the resolution, it would reflect badly on China's image and undermine its efforts to portray itself as a responsible global power," Jakobson said.

    She said China attaches great importance to the United Nations and would like to see the role of the UN strengthened - though Beijing is wary of many proposals that want to expand Security Council membership and/or give power to members other than the present five permanent members, the United States, Britain, France, Russia and China.

    The SIPRI report argues that actors outside the traditional power structure are increasingly shaping China's foreign policy.

    Influential new actors on the margins include Chinese state- owned enterprises, especially energy companies, which, due to their widespread international outreach, affect China's bilateral relationships and diplomacy at large.

    The others include local governments, especially in border and coastal provinces, which seek more lucrative trade and foreign investment opportunities.

    At the same time, there is growing importance of researchers, who serve as advisors to officials and media, and netizens, who constitute a new pressure group that China's leaders at times feel compelled to take into account, not least during international crises.

    The findings also point to a fracturing of authority in foreign policy formulation.

    Diversification outside China's official decision making apparatus - along with changes within it - means that foreigners can no longer expect to only deal with one government agency or Party organ but must take into account multiple actors that have both a stake and say in the decision-making processes.

    A version of this article first appeared on the Inter Press Service News Agency.
     
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  3. Agantrope

    Agantrope Senior Member Senior Member

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    More food and money in the beggar's vessel :emot112:
     
  4. Vikramaditya

    Vikramaditya Regular Member

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    Look at the allies China has:pakistan,North Korea,Sudan,Burma and Zimbabwe,all are failed state and rough state.This is how china want to become Superpower..Actually superpower of rough state and terrorist country...the great china.
     
  5. Oracle

    Oracle New Member

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    If there is any way, China should be kicked out of the Security Council. In today's world order, there should be no place for a Kingdom, but Democracies.
     
  6. SHASH2K2

    SHASH2K2 New Member

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    nah chinese donot splurge like americans. They will control pakistans economy an thus entire country. There will not be free lunches from China.
     
  7. badguy2000

    badguy2000 Respected Member Senior Member

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    the golden time for democracy crusaders has gone,buddy!
     
  8. SHASH2K2

    SHASH2K2 New Member

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    and time for monstrous chi-coms has come . :emot112: :happy_8:
     
  9. Oracle

    Oracle New Member

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    You mean you are happy living your life under a King, in a Kingdom , as a Subject?
    Sorry mate, I love my freedom as a Citizen, in a democracy.
     
  10. pmaitra

    pmaitra Moderator Moderator

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    Actually, kingdoms under a just king are always better than a repressive regime led by an authoritarian superintendency.

    I would like to mention that when Birendra Bir Bikram Shah Dev was the King of Nepal, his subjects worshiped him like God. His successor proved quite different; and the current PRC influenced Maoist party is taking the country down the drain.

    Honestly, if anyone from PRC were to start living in India, I wonder if he would go back, save for cultural reasons.
     
  11. EagleOne

    EagleOne Regular Member

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    pakistan might be on cloud9
     
  12. maomao

    maomao Veteran Hunter of Maleecha Senior Member

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    Come-on, a Beggar Bankrupt FAILED STATE like "land of the pure" or "fort of islam" being compared to vibrant Israel with 25% minority population?

    Ohhhhhh Apologies, Chinese take Israel as USA's interest in Middle-East but here they mean pakistan being a pure mercenary country, where earlier its dollar-army was serving the US, however, now they should be prepared to serve their new master i.e "Destroyer of freedom, democracy and exterminator of democracy crusaders" (yes China).:happy_7:
     
    Last edited: Oct 30, 2010
  13. sayareakd

    sayareakd Moderator Moderator

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    I would like to add that it will be easy for china to exploit there states as rational countries dont interact with these states unless it is against there interest, plus we will going to see Iran, Pakistan, China, North Korea developing into axis. Even there borders are linked together.
     
  14. ajtr

    ajtr Veteran Member Veteran Member

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    China set to reassert clout in UN

    By Thalif Deen

    NEW YORK - When a United States delegate once confronted a Chinese diplomat about Beijing's uncompromising support for Pakistan, the Chinese reportedly responded with a heavily-loaded sarcasm: "Pakistan is our Israel," he said.

    Judging by China's unrelenting support for some of its allies, including North Korea, Myanmar, Zimbabwe and Sudan, its protective arm around these countries is no different from the US and Western political embrace of Israel - right or wrong.

    While China is battling the West over exchange rates, import tariffs and its territorial claims in the South China Sea, Beijing is also lobbying furiously to stall a Western-inspired proposal for a commission of inquiry on possible war crimes by the military junta in Myanmar.

    "Such a commission should not be seen as a way to punish the government, but to prevent impunity and help prevent further abuse," says the UN special rapporteur on Myanmar, Tomas Ojea Quintana.

    But China, which in January 2007 exercised its veto, along with Russia, to prevent Security Council sanctions against Myanmar, has not shown any willingness to back the proposal - even for a watered-down commission.

    "Clearly," says one Asian diplomat, "China is trying to reassert its political clout at the United Nations as a counterweight to its defensive stand on currency and trade issues."

    The New York Times said on Tuesday the US administration was facing a "confrontational relationship" with an assertive China and is trying to respond to "a surge of Chinese triumphalism" by strengthening Washington's relationship with Japan and South Korea.

    United States President Barack Obama is planning to visit four Asian countries next month - Japan, Indonesia, India and South Korea - while bypassing China.

    Meanwhile, secretary general Ban Ki-moon, who needs China's support in the Security Council if he decides to run for a second term next year, is currently on his fourth trip to China, having visited the country in May and July 2008, and in July 2009.

    In recent months, China has prevented a Security Council resolution against North Korea over the sinking of a South Korean ship and also tried to suppress a UN report alleging the use of Chinese-made bullets in attacks on UN peacekeepers in Darfur, Sudan.

    "China sees value in promoting its image as the Security Council member defending the rights of the developing world, and China sees value in relying on the UN to counter US power," Linda Jakobson, director of the program on China and Global Security at the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute (SIPRI), told Inter Press Service (IPS).

    Jakobson, an in-house China expert at SIPRI, points out that Beijing also sees value in participating in UN peacekeeping operations "both because this enhances the image of China as a responsible power but also because it gives Chinese military experience".

    Still, China relented to US and Western pressure in supporting four Security Council resolutions imposing sanctions against Iran, one of Beijing's staunchest political, economic and military allies.

    The fourth round of sanctions, all of them aimed primarily at Iran's nuclear programme, was imposed in June this year.

    Justifying his country's support for the resolution, Chinese ambassador Li Baodong was quoted as saying that Beijing wanted to make sure that sanctions would not affect the Iranian people or its normal overseas trade.

    Jakobson told IPS that China agreed to these sanctions after much deliberation and on the condition that the energy sector was excluded.

    "This can be seen as a compromise solution on China's part," she said. "The exclusion of the energy sector was crucial."

    Jakobson also pointed out that China wants to protect the massive investments by Chinese energy companies already in Iran or under negotiation with Tehran, and China wants to ensure that its long-term strategic plans for energy security are not threatened.

    In a detailed policy paper released last month, and titled "New Foreign Policy Actors in China", SIPRI said the increasing sway of large state-owned energy companies have an increasing influence on foreign policy deliberations in China.

    Jakobson, who co-authored the report with Dean Knox, said this is one example of that sway, though it is noteworthy that there are other foreign policy actors who presumably were not inclined to advocate China's support of the resolution.

    On the other hand, she said, there were presumably actors who advocated China's support for the resolution because China supports non-proliferation and does not want to see Iran go nuclear.

    "If China had not supported the resolution, it would reflect badly on China's image and undermine its efforts to portray itself as a responsible global power," Jakobson said.

    She said China attaches great importance to the United Nations and would like to see the role of the UN strengthened - though Beijing is wary of many proposals that want to expand Security Council membership and/or give power to members other than the present five permanent members, the United States, Britain, France, Russia and China.

    The SIPRI report argues that actors outside the traditional power structure are increasingly shaping China's foreign policy.

    Influential new actors on the margins include Chinese state-owned enterprises, especially energy companies, which, due to their widespread international outreach, affect China's bilateral relationships and diplomacy at large.

    The others include local governments, especially in border and coastal provinces, which seek more lucrative trade and foreign investment opportunities.

    At the same time, there is growing importance of researchers, who serve as advisors to officials and media, and netizens, who constitute a new pressure group that China's leaders at times feel compelled to take into account, not least during international crises. The findings also point to a fracturing of authority in foreign policy formulation.

    Diversification outside China's official decision-making apparatus - along with changes within it - means that foreigners can no longer expect to only deal with one government agency or party organ but must take into account multiple actors that have both a stake and say in the decision-making processes.
     
  15. badguy2000

    badguy2000 Respected Member Senior Member

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    Most CHinese tourist who have been to India had a diarrhoea once in India,just as New Zealand sportsman did during CWC.....

    If you were really able to read travellogue wriiten by Chinese who have been to India,you might think their travelouges are insults to India.
    lol....
     
  16. Yusuf

    Yusuf GUARDIAN Administrator

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    Its your stupid digestion system that's to blame. Indian cuisine world over is popular.
     
  17. Mustang

    Mustang Regular Member

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    If america, EU, Japan, Australia etc etc put pressure on pakistan, then they will go against china also, just like the way they did it against taliban.
     
  18. Yusuf

    Yusuf GUARDIAN Administrator

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    Pakistan will sure feel happy about being compared to Israel. Anyways pakistan will take anything china says about it as a compliment even if they call it a whore.

    Chinas rise will be slowed by one factor. Its friends or the lack of them. it is in a confrontational mode with every big power though it depends on them to run its economy. The only friends it has are failed states. Compare that to the friends of the original superpower which has helped it so far, UK,Germany,france,canada,italy,israel, japan south korea etc... All industrialized and militarily powerful. I don't see China in its current form going to far unless it changes its policies or its system.
     
  19. ajtr

    ajtr Veteran Member Veteran Member

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    I've Medical reason for it...coz indian dont eat shit like chinese recycle it and do...so it was i think during indian visit chinese visitor missed there Favorite shit and so they caused themselves the diarrhea and recycle and ate that.
     
  20. LurkerBaba

    LurkerBaba Staff Administrator

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    Pakistan might as well put a three clawed dragon in their flag.

    But this is not a recent phenomenon

    Pakistan and USA were best buddies, result : their country being bombed by drones

    Pakistan was considered the fortress of Islam by the Saudis, got infused with petrodollars in 1970s, result: 1000s of wahhabi madrassas which radicalized the populace

    Pakistan and China ? ;)
     
    Last edited: Oct 30, 2010
  21. ejazr

    ejazr Stars and Ambassadors Stars and Ambassadors

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    Well if you look at the historical military and economic aid that US provides to other countries. Israel and Pakistan have been at the top. In the last ten years, Pakistan has actually received more military aid than any other country in the world from the US.

    People of Pakistan may not like the US, but the controlling establishment is basically from Kayani to politcal parties are completely deferent to the US. The main problem will be when the cleft between the average anti-US Pakistan says enough is enough and just gets rid of the top elite something like the French revolution. And that will not be pretty.
     

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