China pushes natural allies India, Japan closer to US

Discussion in 'Foreign Relations' started by LETHALFORCE, Nov 3, 2013.

  1. LETHALFORCE

    LETHALFORCE Moderator Moderator

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    China pushes natural allies India, Japan closer to US




    China's rise in one generation as a global player under authoritarian rule has come to epitomise the qualitative reordering of power in Asia and the wider world. Not since Japan rose to world-power status during the reign of the Meiji emperor in the second half of the 19th century has another non-Western power emerged with such potential to alter the world order as China today. As the 2009 assessment by the US intelligence community predicted, China stands to more profoundly affect global geopolitics than any other country. China's ascent, however, is dividing Asia, not bringing Asian states closer. A fresh reminder of that came when provocative Chinese actions prompted the new Japanese Government to reverse course on seeking a "more equal" relationship with the US and agree to keep the US military base in Okinawa island. That outcome is similar to the way Beijing has been pushing India closer to the US through continuing military and other provocations.

    Given that the balance of power in Asia will be determined by events as much in the Indian Ocean rim as in East Asia, Tokyo and New Delhi are keen to work together to promote Asian peace and stability and help safeguard vital sea lanes. Japan and India indeed are natural allies because they have no conflict of strategic interest and share common goals to build institutionalised cooperation and stability in Asia. There is neither a negative historical legacy nor any outstanding political issue between them. If anything, each country enjoys a high positive rating with the public in the other state.

    Prime Minister Yukio Hatoyama's visit to India last December, soon after coming to office, showed he is keen to maintain the priority on closer engagement with India that started under his four immediate predecessors, especially Junichiro Koizumi, Shinzo Abe, Yasuo Fukuda and Taro Aso of the Liberal Democratic Party (LDP), now in the Opposition. Hatoyama and his Democratic Party of Japan (DPJ) came to power vowing to reorient Japanese foreign policy and seek an "equal" relationship with the United States. But events have forced a rethink.

    How unstable the security environment is in Japan's own neighborhood has been brought home by two recent incidents with China and the renewed tensions on the Korean Peninsula.

    One incident involving China occurred less than two months ago, on 8 April, when a helicopter from a Chinese naval vessel in international waters south of Okinawa flew to within 92 metres of a Japanese defence force escort ship — so close that Japanese sailors could clearly see a gun-wielding Chinese soldier. To compound matters, not only was Tokyo's diplomatic protest summarily dismissed, but Chinese naval ships less than two weeks later, on 21 April, sailed between Okinawa and another Japanese island chain to conduct a large-scale exercise. Once again, a Chinese naval helicopter buzzed a Japanese escort ship. A Chinese military analyst called on Japan to get used to China's Navy appearing in Japan's exclusive economic zone.

    The second incident happened last month. Chinese Foreign Minister Yang Jiechi flew into a rage after his Japanese counterpart, Katsuya Okada, politely suggested that China cut its nuclear arsenal. At the 15 May meeting in the South Korean city of Gyeongju, Yang yelled that his relatives had been killed by Japanese forces in northeastern China during Japan's occupation of China. He almost walked out of the meeting. The upshot of such incidents and the volatility in the regional security environment is that Prime Minister Hatoyama and his Cabinet are now convinced that this is not the time to move the Futenma air base off Okinawa, even if it means breaking one of his DPJ's election campaign promises.
    {
    There is realisation in Japan and India that each is located in a very dangerous neighbourhood and that their security ties with the US are critical.



    ignificantly, there also have been a number of incidents that suggest that China is starting to muscle up to India. The renewed Sino-Indian border tensions have resulted from growing Chinese assertiveness on several fronts — border (Chinese cross-frontier incursions have increased in a major way); diplomatic (resurrecting its long-dormant claim to India's Arunachal Pradesh, which is three times bigger than Taiwan); and multilateral (launching an international offensive to undercut Indian sovereignty over Arunachal, for example, by successfully blocking the Asian Development Bank from identifying that region as part of India in its $1.3 billion credit package last year). As the resistance to its rule in Tibet has grown since last year, Beijing has sought to present Tibet as a core issue to its sovereignty, just like Taiwan. Tibet now holds as much importance in Chinese policy as Taiwan. In ratcheting up the Arunachal issue with India, Beijing seems to be drawing another analogy: Arunachal is the new Taiwan that must be "reunified" with the Chinese state.

    In fact, the incidents with Japan and India serve as another reminder how Chinese policies and actions are counterproductively pushing these countries closer to US.

    There is realisation in Japan and India that each is located in a very dangerous neighbourhood and that their security ties with the US are critical. India and Japan, although dissimilar economically, have a lot in common politically. They are Asia's largest democracies, but with fractured, messy politics. Just as India has progressed from doctrinaire nonalignment to geopolitical pragmatism, Japan — the "Land of the Rising Sun" — is moving toward greater realism in its foreign policy. Their growing congruence of strategic interests led to a Japan-India security agreement in 2008, a significant milestone in building Asian power stability. A constellation of Asian states linked by strategic cooperation and sharing common interests is becoming critical to ensuring equilibrium at a time when major shifts in economic and political power are accentuating Asia's security challenges. The Japan-India security agreement was modelled on the 2007 Australia-Japan defence accord. Now the Japan-India security agreement has spawned a similar Australia-India accord. The path has been opened to adding strategic content to the Indo-Japanese relationship, underscored by the growing number of bilateral visits by top defence and military officials. As part of their "strategic and global partnership," which was unveiled in 2006, India and Japan are working on joint initiatives on maritime security, counterterrorism, counterproliferation, disaster management and energy security. But they need to go much further.

    India and Japan, for example, must co-develop defence systems. India and Japan have missile-defence cooperation with Israel and the US, respectively. There is no reason why they should not work together on missile defence and on other technologies for mutual defence. There is no ban on weapon exports in Japan's US-imposed Constitution, only a long-standing Cabinet decision. That ban has been loosened, with Tokyo in recent years inserting elasticity to export weapons for peacekeeping operations, counterterrorism and anti-piracy. The original Cabinet decision, in any event, relates to weapons, not technologies.

    As two legitimate aspirants to new permanent seats in the UN Security Council, India and Japan should work together to push for UNSC's long-pending reform. Asian peace and stability would be better served if all the three major powers in Asia — China, Japan and India — are in the UNSC as permanent members. Beijing's provocative actions underscore the risks of China remaining Asia's sole representative among the UNSC's permanent members.
     
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  3. LETHALFORCE

    LETHALFORCE Moderator Moderator

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    Japan, Russia agree to expand defense ties - Times Of India

    Japan, Russia agree to expand defense ties


    TOKYO: Japan and Russia held their first high-level defense and diplomatic talks on Saturday and agreed to step up cooperation between their militaries amid regional security concerns such as North Korea and China.

    Japanese foreign minister Fumio Kishida and defense minister Itsunori Onodera, and their Russian counterparts Sergei Lavrov and Sergei Shoigu also agreed to hold joint military and anti-piracy exercises and establish a defense consultation framework.

    Lavrov told a news conference after Saturday's talks that upgrading defense ties between the two countries could serve their national interests in resolving terrorism and North Korea's nuclear threats, as well as other regional disputes. He also welcomed the talks as a landmark development for Russia and Japan.

    "I believe this event today indicates a new stage in the relationship between Russia and Japan," Lavrov said at the outset of the meeting.

    Russia's defence minister Sergei Shoigu said that the cooperation between Japan and Russia will "promote trustful relationships in the Asia-Pacific region."

    Earlier Friday, Japan and Russia agreed to continue discussing a territorial dispute that has kept the nations from signing a peace treaty.

    "We need to act constructively. We should not be emotional, and avoid provocative remarks," Lavrov said in Friday's news conference.

    The diplomats also agreed to hold vice-ministerial talks in late January or February, ahead of Kishida's planned visit to Russia in the spring.

    Lavrov did not mention an attack on Russian missiles in Latakia in Syria. Kishida said he and Lavrov planned to discuss Syria, Iran, Afghanistan and other international issues at Friday's working dinner, which was closed to the media.

    Japan is seeking to broaden its defense ties, in addition to its key security alliance with the United States, in response to China's growing military presence and threats from North Korea.

    Russia has been expanding its trade ties in Asia and President Vladimir Putin has actively sought closer relations with Japan, partly as a counter to China's rising military power.

    It's unclear how much progress is being made toward a resolution of a dispute over four islands that were seized by Soviet forces at the end of World War II. The dispute has kept the two nations from signing a peace treaty formally ending their World War II hostilities.

    Japan and Russia have also stepped up cooperation in developing energy resources, especially liquefied natural gas. Kishida said trade between the two countries totaled a record $33 billion last year, and that further growth is expected this year.
     
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  4. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    China's aggressive & militarist policy towards its neighbours is unifying them against the Chinese,
     
  5. desicanuk

    desicanuk Regular Member

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    Judging by official response of Congress led Indian government I am not sure about this.If anything we have been more than submissive to PRC.
    What did Manmohanji get from Xi Jinping?Nothing except some empty,calming words.We need some one like Shinzo Abe to send the right message to the thugs of Beijing.Talking to PRC is a waste of time.Alliance with Japan and US is a good start.But the most important strategy and the Holy Grail is a sustained double digit economic growth for next two decades.This will not happen if Congress is in power.
     
  6. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    The current UPA govt reminds of the manner in which Nehru handled the Chinese.
     
  7. LETHALFORCE

    LETHALFORCE Moderator Moderator

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    Kissinger believed opening up China would have them abandon communism and help
    break the Russians. It has more or less backfired. China has clinged to communism ,
    Russia is embracing capitalism and Chinese unfair trade practices are ruining US economy.
     
  8. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    I believe that it has alarmed the Communists in China that the US influence is ruining the Chinese way of life & social fibre.

    I posted a thread where a Chinese film accuses the US for trying to break up China.
     
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  9. LETHALFORCE

    LETHALFORCE Moderator Moderator

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    disgraceful to repeat the same disasters as nehru Tibet, Aksai chin, 1962 etc...
     
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  10. debasree

    debasree Regular Member

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    Why not japs help us during freedom strugle mow its time for uphold the freedom & kick start the economy byjap help
     
  11. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    'China envious of growing Indo-Japan ties'

    India should be prepared for more border intrusions as China has a no-compromise policy over territorial issues and is eyeing India suspiciously as it strengthens its ties with Japan, an expert has warned.

    Speaking during an event organised by the Indo-Japan Chamber of Commerce and Industry to discuss the Dr Manmohan Singh - Shinzo Abe Summit 2013, D S Rajan, director of Chennai Centre for China Studies, said that China was suspicious of India’s ties with Japan, pointing to the comments emanating from the State-controlled dailies during Prime Minister Manhohan Singh’s visit to Japan.“The fears of China over Indo-Japan collaboration has to be taken on a serious note. Chinese feel that India is sympathetic to Japan over the row over Senkaku Island,” said Rajan.

    Rajan said that People’s Daily, a State-controlled media has even gone to the extent of stating that Japan is creating dissension between India and China by making use of their difference over the border issue.

    He said that the Japanese sale of their US-2 amphibious aircraft had further fuelled China’s suspicion as the country viewed it as military alliance against China. “If India wants to go closer to Japan, it will be on its own peril,” a State media had warned, said the former Indian diplomat.He also said that the media also attacked Japan for encircling China. He said that the issue with China was that the official statement welcomed the visit, while the State media, which is the mouthpiece of the government, criticised it.

    Dr Sridhar Krishnaswami, the head of the School of Media Studies at SRM University, stressed the need for Japan to look beyond economic ties and forge a stronger defence tie with India.

    Masanori Nakano, Consul General of Japan, highlighted the close personal ties between Prime Minister Manmohan Singh and Japanese Prime Minister Sinzo Abe. He also highlighted various projects undertaken in the State, while thanking the State Government for setting June 30, 2014 as the deadline for the Ennore Port connectivity road. He also said that the Japan emperor Akhito and the empress would be visiting India between November and December.

    'China envious of growing Indo-Japan ties' - The New Indian Express

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    Why should China be jealous of growing ties with Asian countries.

    China, as per their claims, is a peaceloving country that always welcomes the fostering of good relationship the world over.

    Therefore, it is surprising that the Chinese are accusing Japan of creating dissensions between India and China.

    How?

    And how is the U2 amphibious aircraft a lethal military weapon that is worrying China over the sale of the same by Japan to India?

    While juvenile statements is the staple of the Chinese machinery, the statement that India getting close to Japan is to India's peril is really what takes the cake!
     
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