China opens 2012 with ZiYuan-3 launch via Long March 4B

Discussion in 'China' started by cir, Jan 9, 2012.

  1. cir

    cir Senior Member Senior Member

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    [h=2][/h]January 8th, 2012 by Rui C. Barbosa [​IMG]
    China launched a new high-resolution remote sensing satellite on Monday at 03:17 UTC using the Long March 4B (Chang Zheng-4B -Y26) launch vehicle from the Taiyuan Satellite Launch Center. According to the official Xinhua News Agency, the ZiYuan-3 its first high-resolution geological mapping satellite, to be used for civil purposes.


    Chinese Launch:

    The ZiYuan-3 (ZY-3) is the first of a new series of high-resolution civilian remote sensing satellites, grown from a project that was initiated in March 2008.

    The new satellite carries three high-resolution panchromatic cameras and an infrared multispectral scanner (IRMSS). The cameras are positioned at the front-facing, ground-facing and rear-facing positions.

    Two cameras (front-facing and rear-facing) have a spectral resolution of 3.5m and 52.3km ground swath while the ground-facing camera has a spectral resolution of 2.1m and 51.1km ground swath. The IRMSS has a spectral resolution of 6.0m and 51.0km ground swath.

    At launch the satellite had a mass of 2,630 kg. The satellite is equipped with two 3 meters solar arrays for power generation and will orbit a 505.984 km sun-synchronous solar orbit with 97.421 degree inclination. This orbit will have a re-visit cycle of 5 days.

    Operational period will be four years with a possible life extension to five years.

    The new satellite will conduct surveys on land resources, help with natural disaster-reduction and prevention and lend assistance to farming, water conservation, urban planning and other sectors, surveying the area between 84 degrees north and 84 degrees south latitude.

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    The ZiYuan program seems to cover different civil and military earth observation as well as remote sensing programs. The ZiYuan-1 program is focused on Earth resources and looks to have two distinct military and civil branches (this one being operated together with Brazil).

    The satellites are operated jointly by the Center for Earth Operation and Digital Earth (CEODE) and the Brazilian INPE (Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais - National Institute of Space Research).

    The ZiYuan-2 program is probably used for aerial surveillance being operated by the People’s Liberation Army (PLA) while the new ZiYuan-3 series will be used for stereo mapping (like the TH-1 TianHui-1 mapping satellite that is operated by the PLA). ZiYuan-3 will be operated by the State Bureau of Surveying and Mapping.

    Together with ZY-3, China also launched the VesselSat-2 microsatellite built by LuxSpace Sarl, an affiliate of OHB AG.
    Vesselsat-2 weighs 28 kg and will be integrated into ORBCOMM’s Next Generation (OG2) constellation of 18 AIS-enabled satellites after an in-orbit test and checkout phase. The specific orbit of the VesselSat satellites will allow ship monitoring and surveillance in the equatorial regions with a much higher revisit frequency than platforms in polar orbit.
    The exclusive rights to use the data of the Automatic Identification System (AIS) payload belong to ORBCOMM Inc., a global supplier of satellite-based communication and data services.

    Launch Vehicle:

    The first orbital space launch of 2012 was the 156th successful Chinese orbital launch, the 156th successful launch of the Chang Zheng launch vehicle family and the 37th orbital launch from the Taiyuan Satellite Launch Center.
    The CZ-4B Chang Zheng-4B launch vehicle.

    The feasibility study of the CZ-4 Chang Zheng-4 began in 1982 based on the FB-1 Feng Bao-1 launch vehicle. Engineering development was initiated in the following year. Initially, the Chang Zheng-4 served as a back-up launch vehicle for Chang Zheng-3 to launch China’s communications satellites.

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    After the successful launch of China’s first DFH-2 communications satellites by Chang Zheng-3, the main mission of the Chang Zheng-4 was shifted to launch sun-synchronous orbit meteorological satellites. In other hand The CZ-4B Chang Zheng-4B launch vehicle was first introduced in May 1999 and also developed by the Shanghai Academy of Space Flight Technology (SAST), based on the CZ-4 Chang Zheng-4.

    The rocket is capable of launching a 2,800 kg satellite into low Earth orbit, developing 2,971 kN at launch. With a mass of 249,000 kg, the CZ-4B is 45.80 meters long and has a diameter of 3.35 meters.

    SAST began to develop the Chang Zheng-4B in February 1989. Originally it was scheduled to be commissioned in 1997, but the first launch didn’t take place until late 1999. The modifications introduce on the CZ-4B Chang Zheng-4B included a larger satellite fairing and the replacement of the original mechanical-electrical control on the Chang Zheng-4 with an electronic control.

    Other modifications were an improved telemetry, tracking, control, and self-destruction systems with smaller size and lighter weight; a revised nuzzle design in the second stage for better high-altitude performance; a propellant management system for the second stage to reduce the spare propellant amount, thus increasing the vehicle’s payload capability and a propellant jettison system on the third-stage.

    The Chang Zheng-4B uses UDMH/N2O4 for all three stages. The first stage uses a YF-21B motor consisting of four 75,000kg thrust YF-20B thrust chambers motors with swinging nozzles. The second stage is similar to that of the CZ-3A, with a YF-24F rocket motor consisting of one 75,000kg thrust YF-22B main motor with fixed nozzles, and a YF-23F swivelling venire motor with four chambers motors (4,700kg thrust in total).

    The third stage is a specially designed unit powered by a 98kN YF-40 rocket motor.

    The Taiyuan Satellite Launch Center:

    Situated in the Kelan County on the northwest part of the Shanxi Province, the Taiyuan Satellite Launch Center (TSLC) is also known by the Wuzhai designation. It is used mainly for polar launches (meteorological, Earth resources and scientific satellites).

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    The center is at a height of 1400-1900m above sea level, and is surrounded by mountains to the east, south and north, with the Yellow River to its west. The annual average temperature is 4-10 C, with maximum of 28 C in summer and minimum of -39 C in winter.

    TSLC is suitable for launching a range of satellites, especially for low earth and sun-synchronous orbit missions. The center has state-of-the-art facilities for launch vehicle and spacecraft testing, preparation, launch and in-flight tracking and safety control, as well as for orbit predictions.

    The launch center has two launch complexes with a launch pad each (LC7 and LC9), a technical area for rocket and spacecraft preparations, a communications complex, mission command and control complex, and a space tracking complex.

    The stages of the launchers are transported by railway, and offloaded at a transit station south of the launch complex. They are then transported by road to the technical area for checkout and testing.

    The launchers are assembled at the launch pad using a crane at the top of the umbilical tower to hoist each stage in place. Satellites are airlifted to the Taiyuan Wusu Airport 300 km away, and then transported to the center by road.
    (Images via ChinaNews.com and Xinhua)

    China opens 2012 with ZiYuan-3 launch via Long March 4B | NASASpaceFlight.com
     
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  3. shiphone

    shiphone Senior Member Senior Member

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    January 13

    http://www.nasaspaceflight.com/2012/01/china-launch-again-long-march-3a-launches-fengyun-2f/

    No.2 Lunch Mission
    -------------------------
    China launch again – Long March 3A launches FengYun-2F

    For their second launch of 2012, the Chinese have launched the FengYun-2F geostationary meteorological satellite from the Xichang Satellite Launch Center using their Long March 3A (Chang Zheng-3A-Y22) rocket from pad LC3. Launch took place at 00:56 UTC on Friday.

    Chinese Launch:

    Developed by the Shanghai Academy of Space Flight Technology (SAST) and China Academy of Space Technology (CAST), this meteorological satellite series had already seen the launch of four operational satellites, with two more scheduled before the new FengYun-4 satellites enters service.

    The most important instrument on FY-2F is the IVISSR is a multi-purpose imaging Vis/IR radiometer.

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    This instrument is designed to address more objectives by appropriate blending of the characteristics of spectral coverage and resolution, spatial resolution, radiometric accuracy, etc. It will cover the full Earth disk and will operate in VIS – TIR with five channels. Spectral coverage in bands of Vis, NIR, SWIR, MWIR and TIR.

    The instrument will be used for determining the atmospheric temperature (column/profile), cloud liquid water (column/profile), cloud type, precipitation rate (liquid) at the surface, short-wave Earth surface bi-directional reflectance, sea surface temperature, ocean imagery, land surface temperature, vegetation type and land surface imagery. FY-2F is also equipped with a solar X-ray detector for monitoring and early warning of solar flares.

    The development of the FY-2 geosynchronous meteorological satellite series started in the 1980s. The first satellite was ready for launch in 1994, however, when the satellite was being loaded with propellant in the process facilities at the Xichang Satellite Launch Center, it exploded killing one technician and injuring 31 others.

    The explosion destroyed the satellite and it took three years to prepare a replacement after the redesign of the propellant tank system. The first FY-2 satellite to reach orbit, FY-2A FengYun-2A (24834 1997-029A), was eventually launched by the CZ-3 Chang Zheng-3 (Y11) launcher from the LC1 launch platform at Xichang on 10 June 1997.

    This satellite was operational until April 1998 when problems started. The control of the satellite was regained on December 1998, but the capabilities of the satellite were now very limited with only six images a day. The satellite was later moved to 86.6 degrees East when meteorological operations ended.

    In general the FengYun-2 satellites are spin-stabilised satellites with a total mass of 1,369kg at launch and 536kg in orbit. The satellites carry a scanning radiometer with an S-band and a UHF data transmitter.

    The two principal sensors work in the visible and infrared spectrum, with best resolution of 1.25km and 5.0km respectively. A water vapour sensor is also carried onboard the satellites.

    With a designed operational lifetime of three years, the satellites normally operate at 105 degrees E in the geosynchronous orbit.

    Launch history:

    FY-2B (26382 2000-032A) was launched at 1150UTC on June 25, 2000 by the Chang Zheng-3A (Y12) rocket from the LC1 launch platform from the Xichang launch centre on 10 June 1997. This was the last CZ-3A launch. FY-2B operated at 86.6 degrees East.

    The last satellite of the original FY-2 series, FY-2C (28451 2004-042A) was launched at 0120UTC on October 19, 2001 by the CZ-3A Chang Zhng-3A (Y9) rocket from the LC3 launch platform at Xichang. This satellite operated on the original location of 105 degrees East. The three first satellites are now retired.

    FY-2D (29640 2006-053A) was launched by the CZ-3A (Y11) at 053:23UTC on December 8, 2006 and FY-2E (33463 2008-066A) was launched at 0054:04UTC on December 23, 2008 by the Chang Zheng-3A (Y20) launch vehicle. The FY-2D is operational at 86.6 degrees East while FY-2E is operational at 105 degrees East. Two more satellites are schedule for launch on 2012 (FY-2G) and 2014 (FY-2H).

    FengYun-2F was launched by a CZ-3A Chang Zheng-3A launch vehicle on its 23rd.

    The CZ-3A is a three-stage liquid launch vehicle, which has inherited the mature technology of the CZ-3 Chang Zheng-3. An upgraded liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen cryogenic third stage has been developed to enable CZ-3A performing greater geostationary transfer orbit (GTO) capability.

    The CZ-3A is equipped with a more flexible and sophisticated control system which supports substantial attitude adjustments to orient the payloads before spacecraft separation and provides adjustable satellite spin-up rotation rate. It has paved the way for the development of CZ-3B Chang Zheng-3B and CZ-3C Chang Zheng-3C, and become the basic type of GTO launch vehicles.

    The CZ-3A is mainly used for GTO missions; it also can be used for LEO, SSO and polar orbit missions, as well as dual-launch and multiple-launch missions. The launch capacity of the CZ-3A to GTO is 2,650 kg, the lift-off mass is 241,000 kg, the overall length is 52.5 meters, the diameter of first stage and second stage is 3.35 meters, the diameter of third stage is 3.0 meters, and the maximum fairing diameter is 3.35 meters.

    The first stage and second stage of CZ-3A employ storable propellants, i.e. unsymmetrical dimethy1 hydrazine (UDMH) and nitrogen tetroxide (N-2O4), and the third stage uses cryogenic propellants, i.e. liquid hydrogen (LH2) and liquid oxygen (LOX).

    On the first stage the CZ-3A uses a DaFY6-2 engine with 2961.6 kN of thrust, while the second stage is equipped with a DaFY20-1 main engine (742 kN) and four DaFY21-1 vernier engines (11.8 kN each). The third stage is equipped with two YF-75 engines (78.5 kN each).

    The fairing diameter of the CZ-3A is 3.35 meters and has a length of 8.89 meters.

    CZ-3A consists of rocket structure, propulsion system, control system, telemetry system, tracking and safely system, coast phase propellant management and attitude control system, cryogenic propellant utilization system, separation system and auxiliary system, etc.

    The launch success rate of CZ-3A is 100 percent since its maiden flight on February 8, 1994 when it successfully launched two experimental satellites (the Shi Jian-4 and the Kua Fu-1, a DFH-3 model). And it was awarded the “Gold Launch Vehicle” title by China Aerospace Science and Technology Corporation in June, 2007.

    This was the 157th successful Chinese orbital launch, the 157th launch of a Chang Zheng launch vehicle, the 1st launch from Xichang in 2012 (69th overall), and the 2nd orbital launch for China in 2012.

    Launch Site:

    The Xichang Satellite Launch Centre is situated in the Sichuan Province, south-western China and is the country’s launch site for geosynchronous orbital launches.

    Equipped with two launch pads (LC2 and LC3), the centre has a dedicated railway and highway lead directly to the launch site. The Command and Control Centre is located seven kilometers south-west of the launch pad, providing flight and safety control during launch rehearsal and launch.

    Down range Tracking and Control stations of the launch center are located in Xichang City and Yibin City of Sichuan Province, and Guiyang City of Guizhou Province. Each of them houses tracking and measurement equipment for the powered phase of a launch vehicle flight.

    Other facilities on the Xichang Satellite Launch Centre are the Launch Control Centre, propellant fuelling systems, communications systems for launch command, telephone and data communications for users, and support equipment for meteorological monitoring and forecasting.

    During 1993-1994 Xi Chang underwent extensive modernization and expansion, in part due to the requirements of the CZ-3 launcher family and in part to meet commercial customer needs.

    The first launch from Xichang took place at 12:25UTC on January 29, 1984, when the CZ-3 Chang Zheng-3 (Y1) was launched the Shiyan Weixing (14670 1984-008A) communications satellite into orbit.

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  4. shiphone

    shiphone Senior Member Senior Member

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    February 24 (1612:04.289UTC)

    Long March 3C launches fifth Compass-G satellite into orbit | NASASpaceFlight.com

    No.3 Lunch Mission
    ---------------------------------
    Long March 3C launches fifth Compass-G satellite into orbit

    The Chinese were back in action on Friday, launching the fifth Compass-G satellite into orbit via their Long March 3C (Chang Zheng 3C) launch vehicle. The 16:12 UTC launch from the C2 launch complex of the Xichang Satellite Launch Center, in Sichuan Province was China’s third launch of the year.

    Chinese Launch:

    The Compass Navigation Satellite System (CNSS) is China’s second-generation satellite navigation system approved by the Chinese government in 2004, and is capable of providing continuous, real-time passive 3D geo-spatial positioning and speed measurement.

    The system is used initially to provide high-accuracy positioning services for users in China and its neighboring regions, covering an area of about 120 degrees longitude in the Northern Hemisphere using five Compass-G, five Compass-IGSO and four Compass-M satellites.

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    The long-term goal is to develop a global navigation satellite network similar to the GPS and GLONASS by 2020 eventually consisting a constellation of 35 vehicles, including 27 MEO (21,500 km orbits) satellites, three IGSO satellites (inclined at 55 degrees) and five GSO satellites.

    The system will be dual use, based around a civilian service that will provide an accuracy of 10 meters in the user position, 0.2 m/s on the user velocity and 50 nanoseconds in time accuracy; and the military and authorized user’s service, providing higher accuracies. The first phase of the project will see the coverage of the Chinese territory but in the future the Compass constellation will cover the entire globe.

    Developed from the DFH-3B satellite platform, the Compass-G satellites orbit the planet on geostationary orbits and have a lifespan of 12 to 15 years. The satellites transmit signals on the: 1195.14-1219.14MHz, 1256.52-1280.52MHz, 1559.05-1563.15MHz and 1587.69-1591.79MHz, carrier frequencies.

    The previous BeiDou-2 ‘Compass’ launch took place on December 1st, 2011, when a Chang Zheng-3A orbited the ‘Compass-I5′ (37948 2011-073A) satellite.

    DFH-3B is an updated version of DFH-3 bus, a communications satellite bus whose capability is between high and medium ones. It adopts hexahedral structure, consisting of propulsion, service and communication modules, communication antennas and solar arrays and adopts 3-axis stabilized attitude control.

    Its dimensions are 2200mm × 2000mm × 3100mm, and its mass is 3,800 kg with a payload mass of 400 kg to 450 kg. This satellite bus is applicable to communications and navigation satellites and deep space probes through adaptive modification.

    Click here for other Chinese Articles: Chinese | NASASpaceFlight.com

    This was the eight flight of the CZ-3C Chang Zheng-3C launch vehicle that is primarily used for launching satellite to Geostationary Transfer Orbit (GTO). This rocket was developed to fill the gap between the CZ-3A Chang Zheng-3A and the CZ-3B Chang Zheng-3B, having a payload capacity of 3,800 kg for GTO. This is a three stage launch vehicle identical to the CZ-3B but only using two strap-on boosters on its first stage.

    CZ-3C provides two types of fairing and two kinds of fairing encapsulating process and four different payload interfaces, which is the same as CZ-3B launch vehicle. The various fairing and interface adapter and the suitable launch capacity make CZ-3C a good choice for user to choose the launch service.

    The development of the CZ-3C started in February 1999. The rocket has a liftoff mass of 345,000 kg, sporting structure functions to withstand the various internal and external loads on the launch vehicle during transportation, hoisting and flight.

    The rocket structure also combines all sub-systems together and is composed of two strap on boosters, first stage, second stage, third stage and payload fairing.

    The first two stages as well as the two strap on boosters use hypergolic (N2O4/UDMH) fuel while the third stage uses cryogenic (LOX/LH2) fuel. The total length of the CZ-3C is 54.838 meters, with a diameter of 3.35 meters on the core stage and 3.00 meters on the third stage.

    On the first stage, the CZ-3C uses a DaFY6-2 engine with a 2961.6 kN thrust and a specific impulse of 2556.2 Ns/kg. The first stage diameter is 3.35 m and the stage length is 26.972 m.

    Each strap on booster is equipped with a DaFY5-1 engine with a 704.4 kN thrust and a specific impulse of 2556.2 Ns/kg. The strap on booster diameter is 2.25 m and the strap on booster length is 15.326 m.

    The second stage is equipped with a DaFY20-1 main engine (742 kN / 2922.57 Ns/kg) and four DaFY21-1 vernier engines (11.8 kN / 2910.5 Ns/kg each). The second stage diameter is 3.35 m and the stage length is 9.470 m.

    The third stage is equipped with two YF-75 engines developing 78.5 kN each and with a specific impulse of 4312 Ns/kg. The fairing diameter of the CZ-3C is 4.00 meters and has a length of 9.56 meters.

    The typical flight sequence of the CZ-3C for a standard GTO mission starts at T-0s with the ignition of the first stage engine and the two strap on boosters. Pitch over maneuver comes at T+10s. The strap on boosters end of ignition takes place at T+127.5s followed by boosters separation at T+129.0s.

    First stage shutdown takes place at T+145.2 s, followed at T+146.7s by the first stage separation and ignition of the second stage. Separation of the fairing happens at T+258.7s. Second stage main engine shutdown takes place at T+328.0 s and second stage vernier shutdown occurs five seconds latter.

    The separation of the second stage and the first ignition of the third stage take place at T+334.0s. This first ignition will last for 5 minutes and 16.6 seconds, ending at T+650.6s. After the first shutdown of the third stage the vehicle enters on a coast phase at T+654.1s, which will end at T+1323.2s with the second ignition of the third stage. This will end at T+1474.9s, beginning the velocity adjustment maneuver that lasts for 20 seconds.

    Spacecraft separation occurs at T+1574.9s.

    The first launch of the CZ-3C Chang Zheng-3C launch vehicle took place on April 25, 2008, when it orbited the first TL-1 Tianlian-1 tracking and data relay satellite.

    The Xichang Satellite Launch Centre is situated in the Sichuan Province, south-western China and is the country’s launch site for geosynchronous orbital launches.

    Equipped with two launch pads (LC2 and LC3), the centre has a dedicated railway and highway lead directly to the launch site. The Command and Control Centre is located seven kilometers south-west of the launch pad, providing flight and safety control during launch rehearsal and launch.

    Down range Tracking and Control stations of the launch center are located in Xichang City and Yibin City of Sichuan Province, and Guiyang City of Guizhou Province. Each of them houses tracking and measurement equipment for the powered phase of a launch vehicle flight.

    Other facilities on the Xichang Satellite Launch Centre are the Launch Control Centre, propellant fuelling systems, communications systems for launch command, telephone and data communications for users, and support equipment for meteorological monitoring and forecasting.

    During 1993-1994 Xichang underwent extensive modernization and expansion, in part due to the requirements of the CZ-3 launcher family and in part to meet commercial customer needs.

    The first launch from Xichang took place at 12:25UTC on January 29, 1984, when the CZ-3 Chang Zheng-3 (CZ3-1) launched the Shiyan Weixing (14670 1984-008A) communications satellite into orbit

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  5. shiphone

    shiphone Senior Member Senior Member

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    March 31 (1027:04.438UTC)

    Chinese Long March 3B/E launches Apstar-7 | NASASpaceFlight.com

    No.4 Lunch Mission
    -----------------------------------
    Chinese Long March 3B/E launches Apstar-7

    March 31st, 2012 by Rui C. Barbosa
    China opened their 2012 commercial launch manifest with the lofting of the Apstar-7 into orbit. The launch took place at 10:27UTC from the LC2 launch platform at the from the Xichang satellite Launch Center, using a Long March 3B/ (Chang Zheng-3B/E) launch vehicle.

    Chinese Commercial Launch:

    Apstar-7 satellite is an advanced telecommunications satellite based on Spacebus 4000 C2 of Thales Alenia Space with a lift-off mass of 5,054 kg and a design lifetime over 15 years.

    The satellite has 56 operational transponders (28 C-band and 28 Ku-band) onboard, and will replace the current Apstar-2R satellite at 76.5 degrees East Longitude.

    Apstar-7 satellite’s C-band global beam covers Asia, Africa, Australia and part of Europe, while its multiple Ku band include a China Beam, a Middle East & North Africa Beam, an Africa Beam and a Steerable Spot Beam – able to provide in-beam and cross-beam broadcast and telecommunication services.

    The Spacebus 4000 is a medium-class telecommunication satellite (launch mass from 3000 kg for the B3 version to 5900 kg for the C4 version) with a strong successful flight heritage and proposed with a realistic and safe manufacturing schedule. It can easily accommodate a large range of payloads in every band (Ku, C, Ka, X, S, L) to satisfy customer needs.

    The solar array power offered by the Spacebus 4000 is up to 15.8 kW with a payload power up to 11.6 kW, typically 80 to 100 active channels with medium RF power (105/110W in Ku band). Standard equipment and system designs available in Ku/C and Ka frequency bands, while other frequency bands (X, S, L) can be proposed.

    Projected orbital injection parameters are 200 km perigee, 50,281 km apogee and 27.4 degree inclination.

    China’s fourth launch in 2012 was also the 159th successful Chinese orbital launch, the 159th launch of a Chang Zheng launch vehicle, the 3rd launch from Xichang in 2012 and the 71st orbital launch from Xichang.

    Established in 1980, China Great Wall Industry Corporation (CGWIC) is the sole commercial organization authorized by the Chinese government to provide satellites, commercial launch services and to carry out international space cooperation.

    As the professional company promoting international cooperation for China’s space industry, CGWIC is devoted to the internationalized development of China’s space industry. CGWIC has developed into a system integrator for space products and services.

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    It can meet customers’ multi-directional needs by providing comprehensive solutions for commercial launch services, satellite export, satellite ground tracking and control station construction, satellite applications, project financing, project insurance and technical training, etc. Through extensive international cooperation, CGWIC enjoys an excellent reputation in the international aerospace industry, the financial community and the insurance circle.

    In addition, CGWIC is actively involved in the international marketing of civilian products and services utilizing space technology and provides high quality products and specialized services in diversified fields including satellite technology applications, green energy, information & electronic products, petroleum & petrochemical equipment, new materials, consulting services, international trade, international exhibition, international logistics, project contracting, international bidding, etc.

    APT Satellite Company Limited is one of the leading satellite operators in the Asia Pacific region. Its fleet of five Apstar satellites provides quality and “one-stop-shop” broadcast and telecommunications services covering about 75 percent of the world’s population in Asia, Europe, Africa and Australia. APT commissioned Apstar 7 with Thales Alenia Space France on September 29, 2009.

    Thales Alenia Space France is one of the leading satellite manufacturers in the world. ApstarR-7 is the seventh Thales Alenia Space -manufactured satellite launched by Long March launch vehicle.

    Launch vehicle:

    Developed from the CZ-3A Chang Zheng-3A, the CZ-3B Chang Zheng-3B is the most powerful launch vehicle on the Chinese space launch fleet. The Apstar-7 launch was the 19th flight of CZ-3B and the 50th flight of CZ-3A series launch vehicles.

    The CZ-3B features enlarged launch propellant tanks, better computer systems, a larger 4.2 meter diameter payload fairing and the addition of four strap-on boosters in the core stage that give an additional help in the first phase of the launch.

    The rocket – which has a total length of 54.84 meters and a core diameter of 3.35 meters – is capable of launching a 11,200 kg satellite to a low Earth orbit or a 5,100 kg cargo to a geosynchronous transfer orbit.

    The first launch of the CZ-3B took place on February 14, 1996 – but ended in failure in what is now known has the “St. Valentine’s Day Massacre”. (L2 link for raw video). The disaster occurred when the CZ-3B failed two seconds after liftoff and crashed in a near by village killing untold numbers of local people.

    The first successful launch took place on August 19th, 1997, when the second CZ-3B orbited the Agila-2 ‘Mabuhay’ (24901 1997-042A) communications satellite.

    In recent years, the CZ-3B/E (Enhanced Version) launch vehicle was developed, increasing the GTO capacity up to 5,500kg. The CZ-3B/E has nearly the same configurations with CZ-3B except its enlarged core stage and boosters.

    On May 14, 2007, the first flight of CZ-3B/E was performed successfully, sending the NigcomSat-1 into pre-determined orbit. With the improved GTO launch capability, CZ-3B/E is dedicated for launching heavy GEO communications satellite.

    Launch Site:

    The Xichang Satellite Launch Centre is situated in the Sichuan Province, south-western China and is the country’s launch site for geosynchronous orbital launches.

    Equipped with two launch pads (LC2 and LC3), the centre has a dedicated railway and highway lead directly to the launch site. The Command and Control Centre is located seven kilometers south-west of the launch pad, providing flight and safety control during launch rehearsal and launch.

    Other facilities on the Xichang Satellite Launch Centre are the Launch Control Centre, propellant fuelling systems, communications systems for launch command, telephone and data communications for users, and support equipment for meteorological monitoring and forecasting.

    The first launch from Xichang took place at 12:25UTC on January 29, 1984, when the CZ-3 Chang Zheng-3 (CZ3-1) launched the Shiyan Weixing (14670 1984-008A) communications satellite into orbit.

    China Schedule:

    While preparing for the long expected manned Shenzhou-9 launch, schedule do take place between June and August, China is keeping busy with a list of important upcoming missions.

    In April, China is expected to conduct the first launch of the year from Jiuquan, with a Long March 2D launch vehicle orbiting the second TH-1 Tianhui mapping satellite. That will be followed – in April or May) – by the first dual Beidou-2 launch of the Long March 3B launch vehicle, orbiting two new Compass-M satellites. A similar launch is expected in June.

    Other commercial or international missions later in the year include the launch of the VRSS-1 ‘Francisco Miranda’ satellite for Venezuela, scheduled for September or October, and the CBERS-3 international cooperation mission with Brazil, likely to take place in December.

    The flagship Chinese mission is the manned docking mission of the Shenzhou-9. Flight hardware will likely be transported to Jiuquan in the next few weeks, with the currently unnamed flight crew already undergoing active training for the mission.

    (Images via ChinaDaily.cn, Xinhua and L2).

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  6. shiphone

    shiphone Senior Member Senior Member

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    April 29 (2050:03.968UTC)

    China launches Compass duo via Long March 3B | NASASpaceFlight.com

    No.5 Lunch Mission
    -------------------------------------------

    China launches Compass duo via Long March 3B


    April 29th, 2012 by Rui C. Barbosa
    The Chinese have launched a pair of navigation satellites, marking the first time a Long March 3B (Chang Zheng 3B) launch vehicle has been used for this kind of mission. The launch of the Compass-M3 and Compass-M4 satellites took place at 2050UTC on Sunday from the LC2 launch complex of the Xichang Satellite Launch Center.

    Chinese Dual Passenger Launch:

    Developed from the DFH-3B satellite platform, the Compass-M satellites are deployed in 21500~24100 km, 55 degree inclination intermediate circular orbits. The first Compass-M (31115 2007-011A) satellite was launched at 2011UTC on April 13th, 2007 by the CZ-3A Chang Zheng-3A (Y13) from the LC3 launch complex of the Xichang Satellite Launch Center.

    China has developed two models for Compass-M satellites. The two satellites that were launched on Sunday, are based on the DFH-3 bus and are equipped with an apogee propulsion system for final orbit insertion. The second model is not equipped with an apogee propulsion system and is completely different from DFH-3 bus. Still under development, latter model will not fly until the second construction phase of the Compass constellation begins.

    See Also
    Chinese Forum Section
    65 Launch Vehicle Manuals (L2)
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    The Compass Navigation Satellite System (CNSS) is China’s second-generation satellite navigation system and was approved by the Chinese government in 2004. It is capable of providing continuous, real-time passive 3D geo-spatial positioning and speed measurement.

    The system is initially used to provide high-accuracy positioning services for users in China and its neighboring regions, covering an area of about 120 degrees longitude in the Northern Hemisphere using five Compass-G, five Compass-IGSO and 4 Compass-M satellites.

    The long-term goal is to develop a global navigation satellite network similar to the GPS and GLONASS by 2020, eventually consisting a constellation of 35 vehicles, including 27 MEO (21,500 km orbits) satellites, three IGSO satellites (inclined at 55 degrees) and five GSO satellites.

    The system will have two kinds of services: a civilian service that will give an accuracy of 10 meters in the user position, 0.2 m/s on the user velocity and 10 nanoseconds in time accuracy; and the military and authorized user’s service, providing higher accuracies. The first phase of the project will provide coverage to the Chinese territory. However, the future the Compass constellation will cover the entire globe.

    The satellites transmit signals on the: 1195.14-1219.14MHz, 1256.52-1280.52MHz, 1559.05-1563.15MHz and 1587.69-1591.79MHz, carrier frequencies.

    The previous BeiDou-2 ‘Compass’ launch took place on February 24, 2011, when the CZ-3C Chang Zheng-3C (Y6) orbited the ‘Compass-G5′ (38091 2012-008A) satellite.

    This satellite bus is applicable to communications and navigation satellites and deep space probes through adaptive modification.

    China’s 5th launch in 2012 was also the 160th successful Chinese orbital launch, the 160th launch of a Chang Zheng launch vehicle, the 4th launch from Xichang in 2012 and the 72nd orbital launch from Xichang. This was the 5th space launch for China this year.

    Launch vehicle:

    This was the first double launch for the CZ-3B Chang Zheng-3B launch vehicle. For this double launch, CZ-3B was using the 3700Z fairing. This fairing has an external diameter of 3,700 mm, a total height of 10,796 mm.

    The satellite was mated to the Payload Adapter (PLA) and encapsulated in the fairing. It was then shipped to the launch pad in the fairing and the complete assembly was mated to the launch vehicle. This fairing can be used with the 1194 and 1194A Payload Adapter interfaces.

    For this fairing (like others used on the CZ-3B) the longitudinal release mechanism uses notched bolts, explosive cord, expanding hose, and two explosive bolts.

    The Long March 3B (CZ-3B) is the most powerful launch vehicle in the Chinese space launch fleet.

    The CZ-3B features enlarged launch propellant tanks, better computer systems, a larger 4.2 meter diameter payload fairing and the addition of four strap-on boosters in the core stage that give an additional help in the first phase of the launch.

    The rocket is capable of launching a 11,200 kg satellite to Low Earth Orbit, or a 5,100 kg cargo to a Geosynchronous Transfer Orbit. The rocket has a total length of 54.84 meters and a core diameter of 3.35 meters.

    Each of the four boosters has a 15.326 meter length with a 2.25 meter diameter, consuming 37,700 kg of N2O4 / UDMH. Equipped with a YF-25 engine capable of a ground thrust of 740.4 kN and a ground specific impulse of 2,556.2 Ns/kg.

    The first stage has a 23.272 meter length with a 3.35 meter diameter, consuming 171,800 kg of N2O4 / UDMH. Equipped with a YF-21C engine capable of a ground thrust of 2,961.6 kN and a ground specific impulse of 2,556.5 Ns/kg.

    The second stage has a 19.92 meter length with a 3.35 meter diameter, consuming 49,400 kg of N2O4 / UDMH. Equipped with a YF-24E cluster engine with a main engine capable of a vacuum thrust of 742 kN and a vernier engine with a vacuum thrust of 47.1 kN (specific impulses of 2,922.6 Ns/kg and 2,910.5 Ns/kg, respectively).

    The third stage has a length of 12.375 meters with a 3.0 meter diameter, consuming 18,200 kg of LH2 / LOX. Equipped with a YF-75 engine capable of a vacuum thrust of 167.17 kN and a specific impulse in vacuum of 4,295 Ns/kg.

    In recent years, the CZ-3B/E (Enhanced Version) launch vehicle was developed from the CZ-3B, increasing the GTO capacity up to 5,500kg. The CZ-3B/E has nearly the same configurations as the CZ-3B, except its enlarged core stage and boosters.

    On May 14, 2007, the first flight of CZ-3B/E was performed successfully, accurately sending the NigcomSat-1 into pre-determined orbit. With the GTO launch capability of 5,500kg, CZ-3B/E is dedicated for launching heavy GEO communications satellite.

    The CZ-3B and CZ-3B/E launch vehicles comprise of the vehicle structure, propulsion system, control system, measurement system (telemetry system and tracking & range safety system), propellant management and reaction control system, propellant utilization system, separation system and auxiliary system, etc.

    The third stage includes the payload adapter, the vehicle equipment bay (VEB) and the cryogenic propellant tanks and engines. The payload adapter mates the satellite to CZ-3B and bears the mechanical loads. This cargo adapter also allows for use of one of the international standard interfaces designated as 937B, 1194 or 1194A. The payload fairings consist of the dome, bi-conic section, cylindrical section, and reverse cone section and separation mechanisms.

    The Xichang Satellite Launch Centre is situated in the Sichuan Province, south-western China and is the country’s launch site for geosynchronous orbital launches.

    Equipped with two launch pads (LC2 and LC3), the centre has a dedicated railway and highway lead directly to the launch site. The Command and Control Centre is located seven kilometers south-west of the launch pad, providing flight and safety control during launch rehearsal and launch. The CZ-3B launch pad is located at 28.25 deg. N – 102.02 deg. E and at an elevation of 1,825 meters.

    Other facilities on the Xichang Satellite Launch Centre are the Launch Control Centre, propellant fuelling systems, communications systems for launch command, telephone and data communications for users, and support equipment for meteorological monitoring and forecasting.

    The first launch from Xichang took place at 12:25UTC on January 29, 1984, when the CZ-3 Chang Zheng-3 (CZ3-1) launched the Shiyan Weixing (14670 1984-008A) communications satellite into orbit.

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  7. shiphone

    shiphone Senior Member Senior Member

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    May 6 (0710:04.736UTC

    China launches Tianhui-1B via Long March 2D | NASASpaceFlight.com

    No.6 Lunch Mission
    ----------------------------------

    China launches Tianhui-1B via Long March 2D

    May 6th, 2012 by Rui C. Barbosa
    China launched the second TH-1 Tianhui-1 satellite - Tianhui-1B - on Sunday, using a Long March 2D (Chang Zheng-2D) launch vehicle from the Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center. Launch took place at 07:10UTC from the 603 launch pad from the LC-43 launch complex.

    Chinese Launch:

    Like the first satellite, launched on August 24th, 2010, the new satellite will be used for mapping using stereo-topographic techniques from orbit.

    The Tianhui-1 (Sky drawing) satellites - built by the Hangtian Dongfanghong Weixing Corporation and established by the China Aerospace Science and Technology Corporation and the Chinese Academy of Space Technology (CAST) - are equipped with a three-dimensional survey camera and a CCD camera with a ground resolution of 5 meters, spectral region of 0.51μm to 0.69μm, and with a camera angle of 25 degrees.

    A multi-spectrum camera – with a ground resolution of 10 meters, and spectral region of 0.43μm to 0.52μm, 0.52μm to 0.61μm, 0.61μm to 0.69μm, and 0.76μm to 0.90μm - was also be aboard. The cameras form an image of 60 kilometres wide.

    The satellites operate on a 500 km circular orbit and are equipped with two deployable solar panels for energy generation that is stored on onboard batteries.

    The Tianhui-1 satellites are part of the Ziyuan program that cover different civil and military earth observation as well as remote sensing programs. The Ziyuan-1 program is focused on Earth resources and looks to have two distinct military and civil branches (this one being operated together with Brazil).

    The satellites are operated jointly by the Center for Earth Operation and Digital Earth (CEODE) and the Brazilian INPE (Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais National Institute of Space Research).

    The Ziyuan-2 program is understood to be used for aerial surveillance, operated by the People’s Liberation Army (PLA), while the Ziyuan-3 series will be used for stereo mapping (like the TH-1 Tianhui-1 mapping satellites that are operated by the PLA).

    Ziyuan-3 satellites are operated by the State Bureau of Surveying and Mapping. There have also been indications that the development of Tianhui-1 program was merged with the Ziyuan-3 project planned for launch in 2011.

    See Also
    Chinese Forum Section
    65 Launch Vehicle Manuals (L2)
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    The Chang Zheng-2D launch vehicle is a two-stage rocket developed by the Shanghai Academy of Spaceflight Technology. With storable propellants is mainly used to launch a variety of low earth orbit satellites.

    The CZ-2D can launch a 3,500kg cargo in a 200 km circular orbit. Its first stage is the same of the CZ-4 Chang Zheng-4. The second stage is based on CZ-4 second stage with an improved equipment bay. Lift-off mass is 232,250 kg, total length 41,056 meters, diameter 3.35 meters and fairing length 6.983 meters.

    The first stage has a 27.910 meter length with a 3.35 meter diameter, consuming 183,200 kg of N2O4/UDMH (launch mass of the first stage is 192,700 kg). Equipped with a YF-21C engine capable of a ground thrust of 2,961.6 kN and a ground specific impulse of 2,550 m/s. Burn time is 170 seconds.

    The second stage has a 10.9 meter length with a 3.35 meter diameter, launch mass of 39,550 kg and consuming 45,550 kg of N2O4 / UDMH. Equipped with a YF-24C cluster engine with a main engine vacuum thrust of 742.04 kN and a vernier engine with a vacuum thrust of 47.1 kN (specific impulses of 2,942 m/s and 2,834 m/s, respectively).

    The CZ-2D can utilize two types of payload fairing, depending of the cargo. Type A fairing has a 2.90 meters diameter (total launch vehicle length is 37.728 meters) and Type B fairing with a diameter of 3.35 meters (total launch vehicle length is 41.056 meters).

    The first launch of the CZ-2D was on August 9, 1992 from the Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center orbiting the Fanhui Shei Weixing FSW-2-1 (22072 1992-051A) recoverable satellite.

    This launch was the 161st Chinese successful orbital launch and the 161st launch of a Chang Zheng launch vehicle, being also the 52nd orbital launch from the Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center. This was also the first orbital launch from Jiuquan this year and the sixth Chinese orbital launch in 2012.

    The Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center, in Ejin-Banner, a county in Alashan League of the Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region, was the first Chinese satellite launch center and is also known as the Shuang Cheng Tze launch center.

    The site includes a Technical Centre, two Launch Complexes, Mission Command and Control Centre, Launch Control Centre, propellant fuelling systems, tracking and communication systems, gas supply systems, weather forecast systems, and logistic support systems. Jiuquan was originally used to launch scientific and recoverable satellites into medium or low earth orbits at high inclinations. It is also the place from where all the Chinese manned missions are launched.

    Presently, only the LC-43 launch complex, also known by South Launch Site (SLS) is in use. This launch complex is equipped with two launch pads: 921 and 603. Launch pad 921 is used for the manned program for the launch of the CZ-2F Chang Zheng-2F launch vehicle (Shenzhou and Tiangong). The 603 launch pad is used for unmanned orbital launches by the CZ-2C Chang Zheng-2C, CZ-2D Chang Zheng-2D and CZ-4C Chang Zheng-2C launch vehicles.

    The first orbital launch took place on April 24, 1970 when a Chang Zheng-1 rocket launched the first Chinese satellite, the Dong Fang Hong-1 (04382 1970-034A).

    The road to Shenzhou-9:

    On May 5, the China Academy of Launch Technology (CALT) plant conducted the delivery ceremony for the Chang Zheng-2F launch vehicle that will be used for the launch of SZ-9 Shenzhou-9 manned mission.

    The rocket passed a readiness review on April 11, allowing for the different launcher components to be sent by rail to the Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center where the manned SZ-9 capsule is already being prepared for launch after arriving on April 9.

    Shenzhou-9 launch is now expected to take place at the end of June or in the first days of July. The Shenzhou-9 should be the first manned docking on the Chinese space program.

    Also, on the subject of the crew, the ltest statements from CALT confirms the presence of the first Chinese taikonauta female on board. The name of Liu Yang has been posted for the main SZ-9 crew, as much as this is still lacking official confirmation

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  8. shiphone

    shiphone Senior Member Senior Member

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    May 10 07:10 UTC

    China increases the pace with Long March 4B spy satellite launch | NASASpaceFlight.com

    No.7 Lunch Mission
    ----------------------------------

    China increases the pace with Long March 4B spy satellite launch

    May 10th, 2012 by Rui C. Barbosa
    Four days after the launch of Tianhui-1B mapping satellite, China has launched a new optical remote sensing satellite on May 10, 2012 from the Taiyuan Satellite Launch Center. Launch of Yaogan Weixing-14 (YG-14) satellite took place at 07:06UTC using a Long March 4B (Chang Zheng-4B) launch vehicle from the LC9 launch complex.

    Another Chinese Launch:

    Once again, the official Chinese media refer the new satellite as a new remote sensing bird that will be used for scientific experiments, land survey, crop yield assessment, and disaster monitoring. As was the case in the previous launches of the Yaogan Weixing series, western analysts believe this class of satellites is being used for military purposes.

    Some believe that YG-14 is a new class of optical observation satellite containing sensors developed by CAST’s 508 institute and the Changchun Institute of Optics.

    The launch also included a small, but as yet unknown, small satellite called Tiantuo 1.

    This was the 162nd successful Chinese orbital launch, the 162nd launch of a Chang Zheng launch vehicle, the 38th successful orbital launch from Taiyuan and the second from Taiyuan this year, becoming the seventh successful orbital Chinese launch in 2012.

    Looking back to the Yaogan Weixing launch series:

    The first Yaogan Weixing satellite (29092 2006-015A) was launched by a Chang Zheng-4C (Y1) from the Taiyuan Satellite Launch Center on April 27, 2006. Developed by Shanghai Academy of Spaceflight Technology (SAST), the details about this satellite were closely guarded, but later it was said that this was the first Jianbing-5 satellite, equipped with the first space-based synthetic aperture radar (SAR).

    See Also
    Chinese Forum Section
    65 Launch Vehicle Manuals (L2)
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    The second satellite on the series, the Yaogan Weixing-2 (31490 2007-019A), was launched on 25 May, 2007, by a Chang Zheng-2D (Y8) from the Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center. Details were also restricted, though it is claimed that this spacecraft is an electro-optical military observation satellite also known as JB-6 Jianbing-6, complementing the results of the Yaogan Weixing-1. This satellite was developed by the China Academy of Space Technology (CAST).

    Another SAR mission was launched on November 11, 2007 when the Yaogan Weixing-3 (32289 2007-055A) satellite was orbited by a Chang Zheng-4C (Y3) launch vehicle from Taiyuan.

    Yaogan Weixing-4 (33446 2008-061A) was launched on December 1, 2008. This was the second electro-optical satellite on the series and was launched by a Chang Zheng-2D (Y9) from Jiuquan. Other satellite on the Jianbing-6 series were Yaogan Wexing-7 (36110 2009-069A), launched on December 9, 2009 from Jiuquan by a Chang Zheng-2D (Y10), and Yaogan Weixing-11 (37165 2010-047A) launched on September 22, 2010, by the Chang Zheng-2D (Y11) launch vehicle from Jiuquan.

    The first second-generation electro-optical reconnaissance satellite developed by CAST, Yaogan Weixing-5 (33456 2008-064A), was launched on December 15, 2008. The launch took place from Taiyuan by the Chang Zheng-4B (Y20) rocket. Yaogan Weixing-12 (37875 2011-066B) was other second-generation electro-optical reconnaissance satellite, being launched on November 11th, 2011, by the Chang Zheng-4B (Y21) launch vehicle from Taiyuan.

    Yaogan Weixing-6 (34839 2009-021A), launched by a Chang Zheng-2C-III (Y19) from Taiyuan on April 22, 2009, was a second-generation SAR satellite developed by SAST, having a spatial resolution of 1.5m.

    Other second-generation SAR satellites were the Yaogan Weixing-8 (36121 2009-072A), launched on December 15, 2009, by the CZ-4C (Y4) also from Taiyuan, the Yaogan Weixing-10 (36834 2010-038A) launch on August 9, 2010, by the Chang Zheng-4C (Y6) launch vehicle from Taiyuan; and the Yaogan Weixing-13 (37941 2011-072A) launch on November 29, 2011, by the Chang Zheng-2C (Y20) launch vehicle from Taiyuan

    The YaoGan Weixing-9 mission, launched March, 2010 from Jiuquan, had a different architecture from the previous missions on the series. Launched by Chang Zheng-4C (Y5) rocket, the mission placed a triplet of satellites in Earth orbit. Flying in formation these three satellites appeared to be like a type of NOSS system.

    The CZ-4B Chang Zheng-4B launch vehicle:

    The feasibility study of the CZ-4 Chang Zheng-4 began in 1982 based on the FB-1 Feng Bao-1 launch vehicle. Engineering development was initiated in the following year. Initially, the Chang Zheng-4 served as a back-up launch vehicle for Chang Zheng-3 to launch China’s communications satellites.

    After the successful launch of China’s first DFH-2 communications satellites by Chang Zheng-3, the main mission of the Chang Zheng-4 was shifted to launch sun-synchronous orbit meteorological satellites. On other hand, the Chang Zheng-4B launch vehicle was first introduced in May 1999 and also developed by the Shanghai Academy of Space Flight Technology (SAST), based on the Chang Zheng-4.

    The rocket is capable of launching a 2,800 kg satellite into low Earth orbit, developing 2,971 kN at launch. With a mass of 248,470 kg, the CZ-4B is 45.58 meters long and has a diameter of 3.35 meters.

    SAST began to develop the Chang Zheng-4B in February 1989. Originally, it was scheduled to be commissioned in 1997, but the first launch didn’t take place until late 1999. The modifications introduced on the Chang Zheng-4B included a larger satellite fairing and the replacement of the original mechanical-electrical control on the Chang Zheng-4 with an electronic control.

    Other modifications were an improved telemetry, tracking, control, and self-destruction systems with smaller size and lighter weight; a revised nuzzle design in the second stage for better high-altitude performance; a propellant management system for the second stage to reduce the spare propellant amount, thus increasing the vehicle’s payload capability and a propellant jettison system on the third-stage.

    The first stage has a 24.65 meter length with a 3.35 meter diameter, consuming 183,340 kg of N2O4/UDMH (gross mass of first stage is 193.330 kg). The vehicle is equipped with a YF-21B engine capable of a ground thrust of 2,971 kN and a ground specific impulse of 2,550 Ns/kg. The second stage has a 10.40 meter length with a 3.35 meter diameter and 38,326 kg, consuming 35,374 kg of N2O4/UDMH.

    The vehicle is equipped with a YF-22B main engine capable of a vacuum thrust of 742 kN and four YF-23B vernier engines with a vacuum thrust of 47.1 kN (specific impulses of 2,922 Ns/kg and 2,834 Ns/kg, respectively).

    The third stage has a 4.93 meter length with a 2.9 meter diameter, consuming 12,814 kg of N2O4/UDMH. Having a gross mass of 14,560 kg, it is equipped with a YF-40 engine capable of a vacuum thrust of 100.8 kN and a specific impulse in vacuum of 2,971 Ns/kg.

    The Taiyuan Satellite Launch Center:

    Situated in the Kelan County on the northwest part of the Shanxi Province, the Taiyuan Satellite Launch Center (TSLC) is also known by the Wuzhai designation. It is used mainly for polar launches (meteorological, Earth resources and scientific satellites).

    The center is at an altitude of 1400-1900m above sea level, and is surrounded by mountains to the east, south and north, with the Yellow River to its west. The annual average temperature is 4-10 degrees C, with maximum of 28 degrees C in summer and minimum of -39 degrees C in winter.

    TSLC is suitable for launching a range of satellites, especially for low earth and sun-synchronous orbit missions. The center has state-of-the-art facilities for launch vehicle and spacecraft testing, preparation, launch and in-flight tracking and safety control, as well as for orbit predictions.

    (Images via ChinaNews.cn).

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  9. shiphone

    shiphone Senior Member Senior Member

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    big pix of today's lunch...

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  10. shiphone

    shiphone Senior Member Senior Member

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    May 26th, 2012

    Long March 3B launches military satellite Chinasat-2A | NASASpaceFlight.com

    Mission 8 of 2012
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  11. shiphone

    shiphone Senior Member Senior Member

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    May 29th, 2012

    Long March 4C Launched Yaogan15 at Taiyuan Launch Center


    @15:31 -beijing time...

    Mission 9 of 2012

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    it is the fifth launche within 30 days...

    Apr...30 LM-3B/E Xichang
    May...6 LM-2D Jiuquan
    May...10 LM-4B Taiyuan
    May...26 LM-3B Xichang
    May...29 LM-4C Taiyuan
     
    Last edited: May 29, 2012
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  12. shiphone

    shiphone Senior Member Senior Member

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    Mission 10 - June 16 (1037:24.558UTC) - CZ-2F/G (Y9) - JSLC, 921 - SZ-9 Shenzhou-9
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    Mission 11 - July 25 (1543:03.769UTC) - CZ-3C (Y9) - XSLC, LC2 - TL-1 Tianlian-1 (3)

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    Mission 12 - September 18 (1910:04.179UTC) - CZ-3B/E (Y15) - XSLC, LC2 - Compass-M5; Compass-M6

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  13. shiphone

    shiphone Senior Member Senior Member

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    Two More space missions recently...
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    Mission 13 - September 29 (041204.576UTC) - CZ-2D (Y16) - JSLC, 603 - VRSS-1 'Francisco de Miranda'

    Chinese Long March 2D launches Venezuela’s VRSS-1 satellite | NASASpaceFlight.com
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    Mission 14 - October 14 (0325:05.010UTC) - CZ-2C/SMA - TSLC, LC9 - SJ-9 Shijian 9A/B

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  14. shiphone

    shiphone Senior Member Senior Member

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    Mission 15 - A Long March-3C carrier rocket carrying a satellite blasts off from the launch pad at the Xichang Satellite Launch Center in Xichang, southwest China's Sichuan Province, on Oct. 25, 2012.

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  15. huaxia rox

    huaxia rox Senior Member Senior Member

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    so is this one different or heavier than the pair of beidou we launched last time.....why this time we have to go 1 shot 1 satallite....
     
  16. nimo_cn

    nimo_cn Senior Member Senior Member

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    Stage 2 is finished, it is time to check out how good the system is.

    Sent from my T8830 using Tapatalk 2
     
  17. shiphone

    shiphone Senior Member Senior Member

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    some updates of the three more space missions conducted this month...

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    Mission 16 November 18 - CZ-2C with Huanjing-1C, Xiyan-1 and Fengniao-1A/B satellites

    Chinese Long March 2C lofts Huanjing-1C into orbit | NASASpaceFlight.com
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    Mission 17 YG-16 Yaogan Weixing-16 CZ-4C Jiuquan launch - November 25, 2012

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    Mission 18 Chinasat-12 (Zhongxing-12), CZ-3B/E - November 27, 2012 (1013UTC)

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    one more space mission is expected for this year....the total number might be 19 as planned ...
     
    Last edited: Nov 30, 2012
  18. shiphone

    shiphone Senior Member Senior Member

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    Mission 19 Göktürk-2, CZ-2D - December 18, 2012 1612:52 UTC


    so it is done... 19 shots and 28 space objects put into orbit...China end 2012 with Long March 2D launch of Göktürk-2

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    Plan for Year 2013...

    source : China launches Turkish satellite Xinhua News
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