China media: 'No-war pledge' criticism

Discussion in 'China' started by Ray, Jan 21, 2014.

  1. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    China media: 'No-war pledge' criticism

    Chinese papers on Monday assess reports that a long-time "no-war pledge" has been removed from Japan's Liberal Democratic Party's (LDP) annual working policy paper.

    According to recent reports, which have not been officially confirmed, the ruling LDP has removed the "never to wage war again" pledge from its policy document.

    Observers in China say these changes suggest that Japan is moving "in a far-right direction".

    "By removing the pledge, [Japanese PM] Shinzo Abe has revealed his true political ambition, which is to reinstall Japan with the right to wage wars," Gao Hong, researcher on Japanese studies at the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, tells China Daily.

    In an article republished in Xinhua News Agency, China National Radio lashes out at Mr Abe, saying the Japanese PM is "hypocritical" because "he had made a no-war pledge" during a visit to the Yasukuni Shrine - which honours Japan's war dead, including convicted war criminals - on 26 December last year, and now he is "slapping his own mouth".

    Qu Xing, president of China Institute of International Studies, tells China News Service that whenever China hopes "to move forward" in Sino-Japanese relations, it is "dragged back" to the controversial issue of visits to the Yasukuni Shrine.

    Mr Qu notes that Mr Abe's recent visits to the shrine reflect the government attitude towards war and history. Mr Abe's actions, as well as the increase in Japan's military might and the decrease in its transparency, are worrisome, he adds.

    Elsewhere, state media downplay a recent anti-China protest march in Vietnam.

    According to reports, around 100 anti-China protesters gathered in Hanoi on Sunday to mark the 40th anniversary of the Paracel Islands battle between China and South Vietnam.


    Police broke up the protest but made no arrests, reports say.

    Papers in China, however, say such protests are rare and ties between Beijing and Hanoi are improving.

    Zhuang Guotu, dean of the Research School of South East Asian Studies at Xiamen University, tells the paper that Vietnam still hopes to keep territorial disputes with China under control because it needs to "co-operate" with Beijing for its growth.

    Rural reforms

    Turning to domestic news, Chinese authorities on Sunday issued their first policy document of 2014, stressing the importance of rural reforms and a national food security system, reports say.

    The "number one document" is issued by the Central Committee of the Communist Party of China and the State Council every January, setting the country's policy priorities for the year. Since 2003, the document has focused on rural and agricultural issues in China.

    "Taking good control of its own bowl is a fundamental principle the government must stick to over a long period of time," the document says.

    Supporting the document, the People's Daily, in an editorial, says the new reform will ensure fair access to public resources and will benefit the farmers as they gain more rights to their assets.

    However, some experts have raised concerns about the problems that farmers might face.

    "A major obstacle for farmers in increasing their productivity is the difficulty of achieving large-scale, standardised production," Zhang Yuanhong, agricultural expert at Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, tells the Global Times.

    "It's hard for farmers to obtain financing to support mass production due to the lack of governmental subsidies and agriculture-targeted commercial channels," Mr Zhang says.

    And finally, papers say the withdrawal of rock singer Cui Jian from the Spring Festival Gala is "not surprising".

    Cui, one of whose songs became an anthem of the 1989 Tiananmen Square protests, pulled out of a major show on state TV after organisers tried to censor his performance, reports say.

    He had been due to play at China's Spring Festival Gala or Chunwan, which draws a TV audience of hundreds of millions.

    The Global Times says the rebellious style of the rocker does not go well with the mainstream gala, so the "break-up" is not at all surprising.


    "It is way more important that outside Chunwan, Cui can continue to have his stage and continue to play the role he wants to play. There are media reports about Cui's concerts, a new music film and preparation of a new album. Whether his role continues is the real touchstone of China's tolerance," the paper adds.

    A commentary in the People's Daily points out that it is unnecessary to place too much emphasis on his withdrawal.


    BBC News - China media: 'No-war pledge' criticism

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    The Japanese new found necessity to realise that the US security umbrella may not last forever and Japan requires to be self sufficient to defend itself from aggression has indeed caused much concern in China, and rightly so, since China has some very unpleasant memories vis a vis Japan.

    The removal of the 'no war pledge' from the official LDP document is an indication that Japan is on the way to self sufficiency. and its refurbishing of Japan's Navy indicates the seriousness of Japan's intent.
     
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  3. t_co

    t_co Senior Member Senior Member

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    The funny thing is that while China and Japan may both be very much at odds, both want to undermine the US-led 'security blanket' in East Asia and acquire greater freedom of action for themselves - and the newly acquired capabilities of both nations are rapidly enabling them to do that.
     
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  4. no smoking

    no smoking Senior Member Senior Member

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    For China, it is true.
    For Japan, that was the story in last 80s and 90s. Now they are relying upon US military back up in their potential conflict with China.
     
  5. t_co

    t_co Senior Member Senior Member

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    It would be more accurate to say Japan would love to be strong enough to go it alone, but it isn't - hence why Abe is desperately trying to find allies against China while sucking up to the US in public (even as his moves put US sailors and airmen in harms' way).
     
  6. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    Japan ride, China rider

    - Tokyo ends arms embargo on India, seeks statement


    [​IMG]
    The ShinMayva US-2 aircraft that India is buying from Japan. Tokyo has agreed to sell India an armed version of the aircraft. Picture credit: ShinMayva Industries Ltd, Japan

    New Delhi, Jan. 21: Japan has decided to end its 47-year old self-imposed global embargo on exporting weapons, for India, agreeing to sell New Delhi fully armed amphibious aircraft ahead of Prime Minister Shinzo Abe’s visit this weekend, despite strong domestic concerns.

    But Tokyo is driving a hard bargain in exchange, seeking a reference to Japan’s ongoing territorial disputes with China in the joint statement Prime Minister Manmohan Singh and Abe will issue after their talks here, top government officials have said.

    Abe is scheduled to land here on January 25 for a visit that could redefine the region’s geopolitics at a time Japan is trying to snug up to India to counter China, and India is trying to walk a fine balance — strengthening ties with Tokyo without upsetting Beijing.

    The Japanese Prime Minister is scheduled to be chief guest at the Republic Day parade the day after he arrives, before key delegation-level talks between the nations that China will watch closely.

    Abe will bring with him historic news — a decision to sell India armed versions of the U-2 amphibious aircraft manufactured by Japanese firm ShinMayva.

    India has been seeking 15 of these aircraft for its navy for close to two years, the officials said. Before Prime Minister Singh’s visit to Tokyo in May last year, Japan had agreed to sell these aircraft to India and the two leaders announced plans to discuss the sale after that visit.

    But India and Japan had quietly — without ever making it public — only agreed to a deal on a version of the US-2 that was stripped of all lethal potential, and usable strictly for civilian use. ShinMayva began reworking these aircraft to meet the “civilian” specifications.

    “In Japan, there are still strong reservations about the export of military equipment and technology,” a Japanese diplomat said.

    The sale of civilian aircraft would have saved Abe from having to answer those critical of any move to defy a 1967 Japanese law barring the sale of military equipment and arms. That law was aimed at demonstrating Japan’s pacifist credentials as it sought to grow in a post World War II global environment.

    At the same time, the Abe government calculated that the sale of the aircraft would help buttress ties with India — a nation the Japanese Premier has repeatedly identified as a key ally he wants to focus on.

    “India, in turn, could retrofit the civilian aircraft to serve military roles, if they wanted to. That was our thinking,” the Japanese diplomat said.

    But Indian officials lobbied hard with Japan over the past seven months, nudging Tokyo to reverse its decision and agree to the sale of armed aircraft.

    The final push came during the visit last November by Japanese emperor Akihito and empress Michiko, who left India full of praise and gratitude for their hosts, and with a message for the Abe government not to jeopardise ties with India at any cost.

    Heightened tensions between Japan and China — which in November sought ownership of airspace over large swathes of the South and East China Sea — are also likely to have pushed Abe into agreeing to India’s demands, the Indian officials conceded.

    But the armed US-2 amphibious aircraft come with a stern push from Tokyo to include a reference to Japan’s dispute with China over islands in the East China Sea. Called the Senkaku islands by Japan and the Diaoyu Islands by China, the uninhabited islands are claimed by both.

    Indian officials hinted they would try and limit any reference to the dispute to an “anodyne mention” of widely accepted international norms on maritime security and the freedom of movement of ships and vessels in the sea.

    “That’s something which we’ve used in the past without upsetting China,” a senior official said.

    But any more direct reference to the dispute over the Senkaku Islands is likely to upset China, the officials said. “That’s what the Japanese want, but not what we want,” another official said. “We’re confident we’ll find a balance.”

    Japan ride, China rider

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    Though this is hardly a lethal weapons platform, yet it indicates Japan's intention to be a major player in the area and a gamechanger.
     
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  7. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    Same thing as China vis a vis USSR.

    However, while in China's case they split, in Japan's case, it appears to reinforce and solidify!

    As far as 'sucking up', China did it too with the USSR.

    Politics and Survival.

    In late 1927, Deng left Moscow to return to China, where he joined the army of Feng Yuxiang, a military leader in northwest China, who had requested assistance from the Soviet Union in his struggle with other local leaders in the region. At that time, the Soviet Union, through the Comintern, an international organization supporting the communist movements in the world, supported the Communists' alliance with the Nationalists of the Kuomintang (KMT) party founded by Sun Yat-sen.
     
    Last edited: Jan 22, 2014
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  8. Srinivas_K

    Srinivas_K Senior Member Senior Member

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    Japan is doing a right thing here, there is no place for Chinese/han hegemony in Asia.

    In reality Japanese are technologically superior and they posses superior arms tech. to counter any threat from china.
     
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