China faces virtual opposition ahead of party meet

Discussion in 'China' started by Ray, Oct 10, 2012.

  1. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    Storms Brews: China faces virtual opposition ahead of party meet


    BEIJING: The forthcoming Communist Party Congress is expected to discuss a major challenge before the next generation of leaders in the form of a "virtual" opposition on the Chinese internet. It's a vast network of alert individuals exposing corruption and misdeeds of leaders and officials.

    Called 'renrou sousuo yinqing', which literally means human-flesh search engines, the network has attracted tens of thousands of Chinese tracking officials with phone cameras and over the internet. "It means that the network is not a computer driven search engine and real human beings are involved," said Wang Ting, a blogger. "Those involved are responsible people who feel ordinary Chinese need to be vigilant even if they are not directly into politics," he said.

    The system, which operates as a kind of a loose Wikileaks, has thrown up thousands of videos, photographs, research documents and mapping of political family trees. In the process, scores of officials and businessmen have been exposed, while the government has been kept on the tenterhooks.

    A recent case involves Yang Dacai, a police officer caught on camera grinning even as people burned in a bus fire that killed 36 in August on the Yanan highway in central China's Shaanxi province. Yang was sacked within weeks after he was exposed over the internet.

    The one-party government, which never faced serious political challenges, is now bowing to the power of this search engine, which acts like a loose opposition system. The government has acted on several officials exposed by 'renrou' system.

    Postings from the human flesh network are put up on several Chinese bulletin board services like Mop, Tianya and KDnet besides Weibo, Chinese equivalent of Twitter. Online video sites such as Yokou, Tudou, and Sina are also used as platforms by the network, which does not have a specific internet site devoted to the activity.

    Original postings that include gossip about the private lives of celebrities, the wealthy, and Communist officials routinely attract hundreds of thousands of comments and retweets. Why the government has allowed the network to flourish has not been fully explained although many feel that the government is losing out to the avalanche of millions of Chinese engaged in social media.

    The government is itself trying to make the most of the situation by posting its own views under the guise of postings by citizens, observers said. There are 50,000 government agencies with web sites and blogs on the internet.

    Official censors regularly ask websites to filter postings that carry certain words and phrases. In fact, the government selectively filters stories and postings, and allows those it wants the public to know and get involved in. The choice before the new leadership, which will be elected on Nov 8, is to either curb or allow the human flesh search engine as a disciplining force over the Communist system.

    Storm brews: China faces virtual opposition ahead of party meet - The Times of India

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    Rather interesting.

    Exciting times ahead for the Chinese people and the Communist Party of China.

    Too much of capitalism and exposure to the West is creating a field for chaos and disharmony - both feared by the CPC as also the Chinese class that is concentrating merely of getting rich quick, by hook or by crook!

    The Chinese posters are right that democracy and such freedom of thought is not good for China.

    I, for one, is convinced that Mao was not 30% wrong and 70% right as was the Chinese Central Communist Party's assessment in 1981, and instead was 100% right. Mao alone could control the chaos that China can lead itself into with a little bit of liberal air and where money can be made quick, through means fair or foul.

    Communism and total iron hand of the CPC alone can keep China on the path to progress and harmony!
     
    Last edited: Oct 10, 2012
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  3. drkrn

    drkrn Senior Member Senior Member

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    won't Chinese leave any intellectual property..
    now twitter too has an equivalent

    i wish to see all Chinese equivalents
     
  4. no smoking

    no smoking Senior Member Senior Member

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    Feared by CCP? You got a misunderstanding here: CCP worries about chaos and disharmony but not "too much capitalism or exposure to the west"!

    Again, you are trying to twist Chinese posters' words. No Chinese reject democracy! What they reject is to be democratic before becoming rich! They don't think democratic system can work properly in a poor country!
     
  5. nimo_cn

    nimo_cn Senior Member Senior Member

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    The case of Yang Dacai indicates that CPC does heed to appeal of the people. Had Yang been an government official in India, he certainly could get away with it, after all, people have the right to smile at an accident scene in India.

    Sent from my T8830 using Tapatalk 2
     
  6. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    Capitalism is a system without govt controls.

    As I understand, the CCP does have laid down protocols, except when it comes to the 'princelings'.

    True, the CCP has not worry about people making money.

    On the issue of exposure to the West, the CCP has no objections to the cosmetic indicators of the Western world, like jeans, Gucci, BMWs, KFCs, MacDonald and so on, but the CCP is very concerned about exposure to 'freewheeling' thoughts and action of the West. Like say Group Cults like the Falun Gong or protests as was seen in HK, where the CCP was merely trying to condition the people to the beauty of the Communist philosophy and the Hong Kong people went berserk and called it brainwashing!

    Compare modern China with the peace and tranquility that was there in China during the Mao era.



    What you are writing is what I say is the 'conditioned' response that has official sanction. Like the one on Mao being 70% right and 30% wrong being sanctioned for stating publicly.

    Likewise, China will embrace democracy once they are rich!

    What is rich and when will that be? Not that it concerns me or sets me on fire!

    It is as bogus as saying that Communism will make all people equal! China has and is still experimenting with Communism and yet people have never been equal and will never be!
     
  7. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    It is true that there is nothing in our Constitution where Smiling is proscribed as a sin.

    In fact, we love smiles.

    However, unlike China, I do concede that if such a thing was caught on camera, then that smiling policeman would be subject to enquiry, given a chance to explain himself and then disciplinary or departmental action taken. It is true that in China it is always a case of 'instant' justice and that justice being decided by Party satraps!

    Just an example of 'instant justice'

    The law that was slapped on her is also very quaint - “seriously disturbing social order and exerting a negative impact on society”.

    Which such a law, anything could be taken to be - “seriously disturbing social order and exerting a negative impact on society”.

    Justice for you!
     

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