China ethnic Unrest - pressure building

Discussion in 'China' started by mattster, May 31, 2011.

  1. mattster

    mattster Respected Member Senior Member

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    All is not well in Western China.

    From inner Mongolia to Xinjiang to Tibet - "the Ugly Han Chinese" have become a symbol of arrogance, cultural and religious oppressions, economic exploitation and destruction of the ecology and way of life of the local culture

    It looks like China always uses military and police power and violence to control these minority groups and the pressure is building every day. Here is the article on Inner Mongolia from the Guardian UK paper.


    Inner Mongolia protests prompt crackdown
    Hu Chunhua, Communist party chief in Inner Mongolia, orders censorship of information and clampdown on visitors



    Jonathan Watts in Beijing
    guardian.co.uk, Monday 30 May 2011 12.11 BST
    Article history

    Chinese police officers on the streets of Hohhot, Inner Mongolia. Photograph: AP
    A communist official tipped as a future leader of China is moving to defuse a wave of protests in Inner Mongolia by choking information, tightening campus controls and promising to reform the mining industry.

    A demonstration by ethnic Mongolians on Monday in the regional capital, Hohhot, was the latest test for Hu Chunhua, whose appointment as party chief of the resource-rich region last year was widely seen as a step towards top office in 2020.

    Censors have blocked information about the biggest surge of unrest that the northern region has experienced in 20 years, with witnesses and rights groups claiming to have seen rallies in at least six communities over the past week.

    The protests were sparked by the killing of a Mongolian herder who tried to stop a convoy of coal trucks from trespassing on the grasslands. The case has become a symbol of unease about economic development that is marginalising ethnic rights and the steppe environment.

    Locals told the Guardian the latest protests took place on Mondayin Hohhot despite tightened security. "It was about 20 Mongolians in Xinhua Square," said a blogger, who goes under the name Blue Sky Pigeon. "But I doubt it will last long because the controls are tight."

    An employee at a hotel on the square confirmed a demonstration was taking place, but it was unclear how the security forces responded. The local police, government and propaganda offices either refused to comment or let phones ring unanswered, but the authorities have been working for several days to quash dissent with a mix of restrictions and conciliatory gestures.

    After 1,000 students took to the streets in Xilinhot last Wednesday, paramilitary police are reportedly stationed at the gates of Inner Mongolia University in Hohhot and checking the identities and intentions of everyone going in and out. In other areas, schools associated with both Mongolian and Han ethnic groups have been subject to restrictions.

    The Youth League Committee of Inner Mongolia University declined to discuss the new security measures, but acknowledged the students' online bulletin board and chatroom – known as Qizhi – had been shut down for "maintenance" until 10 June. Other reports suggest popular social networking sites such as QQ, Weibo and Tencent have been either blocked or heavily censored. A Chinese language internet search for "Inner Mongolia" and "protest" yielded no mention of the events of the past week.

    Hotels near universities and schools have been forbidden from accepting foreign guests since last Friday. "The security has become tougher," said a taxi driver in Xilinhot, the site of an earlier disturbance.

    Hu – a protege of president Hu Jintao (though no relation) – has tried to pacify the protesters with a promise of justice for the perpetrators of the killing of the herder – known as Mergen – on 11 June, and another death related to a coalmine protest four days later.

    Recent incidents "have triggered a great deal of public anger", Hu told teachers and students last week, according to the Inner Mongolian Daily. "We will firmly protect the dignity of law and the rights of the victims and their families."

    Local TV stations, which are controlled by the communist party, have shown Hu's deputy visiting Mergen's family to present a bundle of money. The chairman of the coal trucking company Liaoning Chuncheng Industry has also made a public apology. Police have arrested four people.

    The official Xinhua News Agency said regional authorities would investigate the mining industry's impact on the environment and traditional livelihoods with the aim of improving the protection of grasslands. But many locals remain suspicious. Mongolian independence activists said concilliatory words could not disguise the long-term trends of resource exploitation that prompted the fatal clash between truckers and herders.

    "Mongols have good reasons to doubt the intentions of the government. For the past six decades, the destruction of the grassland ecology, cultural assimilation, political oppression and economic exploitation have characterised the policies of the Chinese government in southern Mongolia," said a group calling itself the "Co-ordinating Committee for May 29/30 Protest".

    If the protests continue, "Little Hu" (as the Inner Mongolian governor is nicknamed) may rely more on coercion and intimidation to impose order on a restless ethnic minority. There are precedents, including the crackdown imposed in Tibet by the current president Hu Jintao in the 1980s.

    Recent mobile phone messages from the Inner Mongolian authorities have warned that the police are ready to "intensify the crackdown", according to Reuters. Amnesty International has urged restraint and called on the authorities to "respect freedom of expression and assembly for protesters".

    Monday's relatively small demonstration, however, suggests Hu's efforts to silence, intimidate and buy-off critics may be working.
     
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  3. jazzguy

    jazzguy Regular Member

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    To free Tibet, XinJiang and inner Mongolia, India mighty army should drive the “Ugly Han Chinese” out of these area. I don’t know why Nehru gave Tibet, XinJian and Inner Mongolia to China as a gift in 1962.
     
  4. Blackwater

    Blackwater Veteran Member Veteran Member

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    Pak-Chin dosti zindabad:pakistan::pakistan::frusty::frusty::frusty::brushteeth::brushteeth:
     
  5. Yan Luo Wang

    Yan Luo Wang Regular Member

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    LOL yeah, "the Ugly Han Chinese". :lol:

    I wonder what would happen if I said the same thing about any other ethnic group.
     
  6. amoy

    amoy Senior Member Senior Member

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    IMO the conflict was not really "ethnic" at its onset, such as Mongols vs. Hans.
    CCP bureaucrats are over obsessed about development in GDP mania leaving "quality" behind as if economic growth were a cure-all (theoretically the cake gets bigger in size). Herders (in this case Mongols) are victimized while benefiting the least from the mining boom. Such incidents are quite frequent in those mining dominant provinces such as Inner Mongol whose GDP per capita may be at the top of China. It's high time for China to change the mode of development leaning towards well being of ordinary people!
     
    Last edited: May 31, 2011
  7. Iamanidiot

    Iamanidiot Elite Member Elite Member

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    If CCP is going to get its ass kicked it will be by the Hans imo no one else can do it.They will do it for the better of themselves and their grandchildren and it will come from the proletariat true commie style from rural areas esp the peasants
     
  8. nimo_cn

    nimo_cn Senior Member Senior Member

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    That is what we call selective blindness, I am pretty sure that Hans also participated in the protest, but western media tends to narrate it as an ethnical confict between Hans and Mongolians disregarding it is actually a conflict between the common people and the local government.
     
    Last edited: May 31, 2011
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  9. nimo_cn

    nimo_cn Senior Member Senior Member

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    If you do a survey in China now, you will find out that peasants are the ones who are most supportive of CPC.
     
  10. Iamanidiot

    Iamanidiot Elite Member Elite Member

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    Iam also seeing that they are extremely pissed of CCP,that they are using fertilizer in its various creative uses and extremely pissed of at the CCP's method of land accquisition without adequate compensation and the behaviour of the CCP cadre at the grassroot level is a matter of much greivances to the public.What I understood is never take what the CCP says at face value there is too much of bluff in it.They are doing a gobbels on the Chinese people literally and thinking that world is a fool to believe in their Charade all the time

    If anyone screwed China with idiotic ideas I will also add Lee Kuan Yew to it.
     
  11. Iamanidiot

    Iamanidiot Elite Member Elite Member

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    China for the most has Law of Rule in the provincial level unlike the rule of law in most other places
     
  12. civfanatic

    civfanatic Retired Moderator

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    This has been going on for at least 2500 years in some form or another. CCP is just the latest incarnation of the previous Chinese governments.

    Read something about the history between Han and Turko-Mongol peoples and you will realize that they have always been at odds and always will be.
     
  13. nimo_cn

    nimo_cn Senior Member Senior Member

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    How many angry peasants have you dealt with in your real life? How many of them have you talked with face to face? What you saw in nothing but what the media wants you to see.

    Don't you feel ashamed to claim that you know better about Chinese peasants in front of someone who actually was born and brought up as one of them?

    Yes, there are people who are unsatisfied, angered, or extremely pissed off by CPC, just like not everyone believes Angelina Jolie is hot, not every Chinese adores CPC. But if over 80% male think Angelina Jolie is hot, she is a hot woman despite the other 20% think otherwise. If the majority of Chinese peasants support CPC, CPC will remain in power despite the minority oppose it. You are only focusing on the minority who are unhappy with CPC and taking that as the truth of China, that is a joke.
     
    Last edited: May 31, 2011
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  14. amoy

    amoy Senior Member Senior Member

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    Again IMo such incidents are skewed if defined as "ethnic" clashes. In the mining corp there may be Mongols or Hans. The core conflict is btwn herders and mining/truckers backed by local govt to bolster "development" at the cost of herders' livelihood and environment. Such cases are visible everywhere - often enough, local adm. go gaga with all kinds of projects while trampling residents' rights /interest. That's got to be changed. People don't eat GDP at all. Once they feel left out of that "boom" or even hurt such conflicts are inevitable.

    As far as I see, peasants/farmers vary from province to province. In coastal areas or hub cities they're doing fine as beneficiaries of urbanization or industrilization therefore supportive but not so in inland provinces. Inflation or low wages irk migrant workers like in Foxconn and Toyota.
     
  15. Iamanidiot

    Iamanidiot Elite Member Elite Member

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    There are individuals in this forum .Who are in great positions of responsibility ,where they have to deal with a multitude of issue.Don't bluff with me I have seen my share of the landed gentry they will put up any of the shit the bureacrat will shovel until none come near his land.Grab his land without adequate compensation or piss him enough you know shit is coming on you in volleys and to the state.

    Nimo_cn your grasp of the english is too good for someone who has come from the rural area in China where english is not the lingua Franca
    Yes they are pissed off .The Chinese have a lot to be pissed off by the CCP.No regime screwed its own people as horribly as the CCP did and it is still doing it.When 13% of your land is arable you view it as an extremely precious thing and plan to use it such a way that its sustainable and in a very judicious manner Iam not seeing it anywhere the only thing is it is doing is taking the people,the land and the environment over the edge to the point of no return..
     
  16. nimo_cn

    nimo_cn Senior Member Senior Member

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    Buddy, I was asking how many Chinese peasants have you dealt with? We are talking about China, not India, so stop citing your understanding about Indian peasant to support your contention about Chinese peasant.

    And disregarding the accounts by a Chinese member who is from a peasant family while touching on Chinese peasant issue isn't the right way to conduct a fruitful discussion.

    See? Now you were trying to question my background.

    My English too good for someone who has come from rural area in China? Lol, then tell me what is your impression about Chinese rural area? All of us working on the farmland day in and day out? No TV, no internet, no English program?

    When I was young, I did have to work on the farmland everyday after I got back from school. Something I had done the most between the age of 6 and 7 was grazing the cattle every afternoon. And I also had to set out rice-plants and reap rice during the summer vacation; cut firewood on the mountains during winter vacation. I would end up in a "sweatshops" as a peasant worker, but luckily I didn't.

    I managed to get enrolled into high school after I finished the 9-year mandatory school. At that time, most children in rural area stop going to school if they failed to be admitted to high school after the 9-year mandatory school, though situation has changed now. And after 3 years in high school, I was accepted by a non-prestigious university in Qingdao. When I was about to finish the college education, my university recommend me to pursue a master degree, and I said yes because it was free. Now I am going to graduate in less than one month.

    I have been learning English since I was 12 because English is made compulsory in almost every Chinese school at almost every level of education, so yes my English is better than normal peasant and a large amount of that credit goes to DFI ( I came here as an English learner to practise English skills). But people like me are not rare at all in China, most of my classmates in high school were from countryside, and many of them got into colleges and came out with a master degree just like I do.


    As I said before, not everyone is happy with CPC, and that can't be possible. CPC is not perfect, but full of flaws. Nonetheless, it is still too much for an Indian to claim CPC regime to be the worst. In almost every aspect, China is doing better than India, common Chinese are having better life than Indians, from literacy, infant mortality to life expectancy.

    I know you are gonna say Chinese can't vote. Well you are right on this one. No, we can't vote, and that is a pity. But have you thought about it? Why do we need to vote? For whatever reason people go to cast the vote, it boils down to making the life better. If people's life is getting better, what is the point of voting? If people's life doesn't get better even after they vote, what is the point of voting? After all, being able to vote is no guarantee of having a better life; not being able to vote is no guarantee of having a wrose life. Why people care about voting so much?
     
    Last edited: Jun 2, 2011
  17. asianobserve

    asianobserve Elite Member Elite Member

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    "China ethnic Unrest - pressure building"

    One of the main reasons that China will not democratize (for to do so would be catastrophic on the short to medium term). But its one-party rule will also contribute to internal unrest for both tribal and democratic reasons (the latter is inevitable like the rising of the movements of the heavenly bodies, especially with global interconnectivity). It's really a chicken and egg situation for China. Good luck to its rulers!
     
  18. Zebra

    Zebra Senior Member Senior Member

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    Free Southern Mongolia, free Uyghur, free Tibet!

    Uploaded by MsOrhon on Jul 6, 2011

     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 10, 2015
  19. Zebra

    Zebra Senior Member Senior Member

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    Inner Mongolian Right Activist Beaten in Secret Detention

     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 10, 2015
  20. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    This is the reason why the Chinese have through various means converted all communities living in China in to Hans.

    Ein Reich, Ein Volk, Ein Fuhrer!

    If one can be made to believe that, then there can be no problems of identity!
     
  21. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    And soon America will say - Free China :rofl:
     

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