China: 8,000 New Police Officers Will Be Sent to Patrol Uighur Region

Discussion in 'China' started by rock127, Jan 31, 2012.

  1. rock127

    rock127 Maulana Rockullah Senior Member

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    China: 8,000 New Police Officers Will Be Sent to Patrol Uighur Region.
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    The government will send thousands of police officers to rural villages in the northwestern region of Xinjiang amid concern about religious extremism in the heavily Muslim area, state media reported Monday. Xinhua, the state news agency, reported that 8,000 officers would be recruited so that every village in Xinjiang would have at least one officer on patrol. It said they would help manage migrants and crack down on illegal religious activities. Xinjiang is home to the Muslim Uighur ethnic group. Long-simmering resentment among Uighurs over rule by the Han Chinese majority and influxes of migrants has sporadically erupted into violence.
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    China boosts police presence in restless Xinjiang - Boston.com
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    The beefing up of the police force is a sign of Beijing’s concern over unrest in Xinjiang, where long-simmering resentment against Chinese rule boiled over in 2009, when nearly 200 people were killed in fighting between native Uighurs and Han Chinese in the regional capital, Urumqi, according to the government.
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    Dozens have been killed or wounded in recent months, and authorities have increasingly relied on overwhelming force and heavy-handed policing to control the situation. China has blamed overseas activists for what it described as organized terrorist attacks, specifically Pakistan-based militants affiliated with al-Qaida. Violence has also worsened in Tibetan areas to the south, following the self-immolations of Buddhist monks, nuns and former clergy. Police have fired into crowds of protesters, killing and wounding dozens, while barring outsiders from traveling to the area.
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    Xinjiang regional spokeswoman Hou Hanmin confirmed to The Associated Press that the 8,000 officers were being recruited under a “one village, one officer’’ campaign. She said their main job would be to improve public services.The deployment also appears aimed at avoiding a Xinjiang crisis during a year that will see the start of a generational leadership transition in Beijing.
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    Leading Xinjiang security official Xiong Xuanguo pledged earlier this month to strictly guard against “violent terrorism’’ and create a “harmonious social environment’’ ahead of the ruling Communist Party’s national congress due this fall, an event held once every five years.“Local authorities must further improve their capabilities for maintaining social stability and amplify the crackdown on religious extremist activities,’’ Xiong said.As with Tibetans, Xinjiang’s Uighurs have been angered by restrictions on cultural and religious life, as well as an influx of Han migrants they feel has left them economically marginalized in their own homelands.
     
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  3. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    A rather horrible time for China!
     
  4. rock127

    rock127 Maulana Rockullah Senior Member

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    Providing support to the "all weather" friend Pakistan is giving fruits to China... it's just a start :lol:
     
  5. tony4562

    tony4562 Tihar Jail Banned

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    It is no big deal. 90% of China's economy is concentrated along the east coast where virtually no muslims let along Uigurs are present. Unlike India where muslims, in quantities 10 times larger than in China, live along side other ethnicities in crowded back streets of the largest cities there, the mere appearance of a Uigur man in Sganghai will cause immediate suspiction among the general public, thus it is virtually impossible for the Uigur terrorists to operate outside their strong hold, that is the rual areas of xinjiang. Even in Xinjiang Ugurs and Hans don't intermix, and if terrorists do something stupid, they will get caught and pay a heavy price.
    China-Pakistan relation ship has little to do with the Uigur problem. China is frendly with the Pakistani governemtn but not the fundamental elements that live within. Without cooporation of Pakistani government the Uigur terrorists would probaby have caused a lot more trouble.
     
  6. amoy

    amoy Senior Member Senior Member

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    Tony, a bit off topic - but - there're widespread Muslims all over China (don't equal Muslim to Uygur). Even Uygurs are present in every main city. Appearance of a Uygur will cause panic? I don't think Shanghai people are that fragile :lol: Uygur shall be in thousands there!!!

    Generally Uygurs are peaceful as street hawkers, or running Muslim Restaurants locally though "Xinjiang thieves" were once notorious.

    The oldest mosque in Fujian (Coastal ) built 1009 A.D.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    Uygur even once ruled North /West China (ref. 回鹘 / 回纥 / 畏兀儿 ) and assisted in restoration of Tang Dynasty. It doesn't hurt to learn a bit of China's demography and history.
     
  7. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    That is surprising.

    Are you suggesting that though Uighurs are taken to be citizens of China, they are not allowed to go to the Chinese hinterland?

    Well, that is news to me.
     
  8. The Messiah

    The Messiah Bow Before Me! Elite Member

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    I hope Uighurs succeed. Chini like to play with fire to hurt India but they will get burned instead of us.
     
  9. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    Northern Xinjiang is relatively calmer than Southern Xinjiang.
     
  10. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    Q&A: China and the Uighurs

    What lies behind the unrest involving Muslim Uighurs in China?

    [​IMG]

    Where did the unrest take place?

    The Xinjiang autonomous region lies in China's north-west, bordering central Asia. Covering one-sixth of the country's total territory, it is a vast but sparsely populated area with about 19 million inhabitants. Some 8 million are Turkic-speaking Uighur Muslims, concentrated in the south of the region around cities such as Kashgar, known to the Chinese as Kashi, which lies 2,500 miles from Beijing. The Uighurs (pronounced Wee-gurs) make up about 45% of Xingiang's population.

    Why is there tension in the region?

    Increasing controls on religious and cultural activity, large-scale Han Chinese migration and economic marginalisation have all played a part. The proportion of Han Chinese inhabitants rose from 6% in 1949 to about 40% by 2000 and migrants had begun to spread from cities into rural areas, where they found themselves in competition with Uighur communities for water and land. Many Uighurs complain that they have not benefited from the region's economic development and have found it harder to access government grants and bank loans.

    Has the region ever been independent?

    In 1933 Turkic rebels declared independence and created the short-lived Islamic Republic of East Turkestan. It was reabsorbed into China the following year. In 1944 the Second East Turkistan Republic was created, but it became a Chinese territory again in 1949. Some Uighurs are nostalgic for these phases of independence.

    Has the area seen recent acts of violence?

    Xinjiang has experienced sporadic outbursts of separatist activity and general anti-government protests. Days before the Olympic games last year, 16 Chinese policemen were killed in a raid on a paramilitary border police headquarters in Xinjiang. No group claimed responsibility. Violence peaked in 1997, with fatal bus bombings and riots after a peaceful protest was suppressed. Experts believe the ensuing security crackdown halted the violence but exacerbated underlying tensions.

    Amnesty International alleges that as many as 200 Uighurs were executed between 1997-99, and claims the crackdown has continued. This year it accused the Chinese government of mounting an aggressive campaign that led to the arrest and arbitrary detention of thousands of Uighurs on charges of "terrorism, separatism and religious extremism".

    Are separatist terrorist groups behind the unrest?

    Chinese state media often blames the East Turkestan Islamic Movement for stirring violence and planning attacks. But there are several groups that tend to be labelled as ETIM. Experts claim that China is exaggerating the threat posed by the group, which has been deemed a terrorist group by the UN and the US. While there is evidence of links between ETIM and al-Qaida, most analysts believe those connections are historic and several believe they were exaggerated.

    More than 20 Uighurs were imprisoned in the Guantánamo Bay detention camp after being captured by the US in Afghanistan. Albania accepted five of them in 2006, Bermuda accepted four last month and the Pacific island of Palau will take the others.

    China and the Uighurs: Q&A | World news | guardian.co.uk
     

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