Chandrayaan II

Discussion in 'Strategic Forces' started by I-G, Aug 16, 2009.

  1. rahulrds1

    rahulrds1 Regular Member

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    (Lunar Libration With Phase)


    [​IMG]
     
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  2. rahulrds1

    rahulrds1 Regular Member

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    Chandrayaan-2 will try out new ideas, technologies

    Source: Hindu

    Chandrayaan-2, the proposed second Indian mission to moon, would undertake “extremely good” experiments and try out new technologies but accommodating foreign payloads on board does not appear to be a possibility at this stage.

    The first edition of the moon odyssey had six foreign payloads and five Indian ones on board but heavy orbiter (satellite) and lander weight this time has put constraints on the Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) in terms of carry-load of instruments.

    “One of the problems was weight consideration. Weight limitation is overall boundary within which we have to work”, Prof U.R. Rao, who chaired the national committee of experts drawn from ISRO centres, academic institutions and R&D laboratories which finalised the payloads to be flown on board Chandrayaan-2 (orbiter and rover), said.

    With a heavy orbiter and lander, the weight of the payloads cannot exceed 40 kg.

    Chandrayaan-2 spacecraft weighs about 2,650 kg at lift-off of which the orbiter weight is about 1,400 kg and lander’s about 1,250 kg.

    The mission, which will have an orbiter, a lander and a rover, is planned to be launched onboard Geosynchronous Satellite Launch Vehicle (GSLV) from Satish Dhawan Space Centre, Sriharikota, in 2013.

    While the lander would be provided by Russia, the orbiter and the rover are being built by ISRO
    .

    Prof Rao, Chairman, Advisory Committee on Space Sciences (ADCOS) and former Chairman of ISRO, said there were informal discussions with players from the US and Europe on flying their payloads, even though ISRO had not issued “availability of opportunity” for foreign instruments.

    “Right now, the weight problem is very serious”, he said indicating that foreign payloads may not be included at all. “We just don’t have the weight. We cannot select payloads which cannot go“.

    But Rao said one or two additional Indian payloads might be included.

    “Obviously, we will give preference to Indian payloads now. We have to provide as much opportunities as possible to Indian scientists“.

    But he said the Russians would conduct experiments with their lander.

    Rao said Chandrayaan-2 would carry out experiments based on the discoveries of its predecessor. “It will conduct extremely good experiments; try out very new ideas and new technologies.”

    A week ago, the committee, after detailed discussions on mission requirements, weight and power availability for scientific payloads, announced that it has recommended five payloads to be flown on the orbiter of which three are new and two are improved versions of the payloads flown earlier on Chandrayaan-1 orbiter.

    It also recommended two scientific payloads on the rover of the lunar odyssey. All the seven are Indian payloads.

    Rao said it is for the first time that India is carrying a lander and rover which would carry out in—situ experiments which are “always something of great importance“.

    He pointed to the planned landing “right at the point”, carrying out in-situ experiments and transmitting from the antenna on the lander.

    The US and Russia have undertaken missions involving lander and rover in the past, he said, adding, “Certainly we (India) are right there on the top“.

    Rao said he was sure if China, which has the capability of sending such a mission, has done lunar landing of this type.

    Underlining the importance of the proposed moon mission, Rao said India has to get into the “business of landers and rovers” sooner or later.

    He indicated that the mission would contribute to enhancing knowledge as and when New Delhi decides to undertake a manned mission to moon which ISRO officials maintain could be a possibility in next ten to 15 years.

    “May be in future.....manned moon mission.... We don’t know when...,” he said.

    Rao said India is seeing Chandrayaan-2 mission as an opportunity to develop new technologies in a “comprehensive way“.

    ISRO officials said the five recommended payloads of the orbiter are aimed at mapping the major elements present on the lunar surface and probe the presence of water and various chemicals in the Earth’s natural satellite.

    It also covers mapping of lunar surface over a wide wavelength range for the study of presence of minerals, water molecules and various chemicals, and the lunar exosphere besides preparing a three-dimensional map essential for experiments relating to lunar mineralogy and geology.

    Both the instruments on Chandrayaan-2 rover are expected to carry out elemental analysis of the lunar surface near the landing site, they added.
     
  3. rahulrds1

    rahulrds1 Regular Member

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    Chandrayaan II Rover Design
    [ Indianexpress : Posted: Monday , Sep 28, 2009 at 0613 hrs Kanpur]

    Source : http://www.indianexpress.com/news/three-iitkanpur-professors-chip-in-for-indias-lunar-rover/522364/

    Of the eight major components of the rover, the three components assigned to IIT-K include development and testing of computer vision-based autonomous 3D map generation system, kinematic traction control, and control and motor dynamics of the six wheels of the mobile robot.

    While K S Venkatesh, the associate professor of the institute’s electrical engineering department, is working on the visual navigation project, associate professor of mechanical engineering Ashish Dutta has been given the responsibility to develop and validate the kinematic traction control models.

    Associate professor of the electrical engineering department Ramprasad Potluri is working on control and motor dynamics of the rover’s six wheels.

    All the three professors who were told to begin work in the project in March 2009 plan to complete their “assignments” by 2010.

    “Under the visual navigation project, photographs of the lunar surface will be taken through a system of cameras installed in the rover,” K S Venkatesh told The Indian Express. He said the cameras will also help in deciding the movement of the mobile robot. The visual navigation will provide 3D maps of the lunar terrain.

    “Once the project is completed, we will test it on a prototype lunar rover at IIT-K and thereafter the technology will be forwarded to ISRO,” added Venkatesh. The final testing and approval of all the components being developed by the IIT-K will be done by ISRO.

    According to Potluri, of the six wheels of the rover, four can be driven and steered. The rest can only be driven.

    “The six wheels will have 10 motors to manage the movement and steering of the lunar rover,” he said, adding that the major challenge will be to bring a co-ordination between all the 10 motors.

    The uneven terrain of moon is likely to act as a hurdle in the free movement of the rover.

    Under the kinematic traction control models, IIT-K will be developing a sub-controller which will correct the path of the lunar rover on the uneven terrain.

    The project will not only help the wheels of mobile robot in maintaining the grip on the lunar surface but also prove essential in deciding the movement of the robot.
     
    Last edited: Oct 27, 2010
  4. nitesh

    nitesh Mob Control Manager Stars and Ambassadors

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    Chandrayaan-2 Will Try Out New Ideas And Technologies

     
  5. Patriot

    Patriot Senior Member Senior Member

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    Data From Chandrayaan Moon Mission To Go Public

    BY: Space Tourism, Space Transport and Space Exploration News

    Voluminous scientific data, including rare images of the moon, from India’s maiden lunar mission Chandrayaan-1 will be made public by the year-end.

    “People will have free access to the huge data obtained from our first moon mission on a web portal that will be launched by this year-end,” a senior scientist of the Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) said here.

    “The data has been split into two seasons, with the first dealing from November 2008 to February 2009 and the second from March to August 2009. The first season data will be archived by year-end and the second by mid-2011,” said ISRO’s space application centre director B Gopala Krishna.

    A total of 26 gigabytes of data and images will be uploaded after archiving the first season.

    The archives will include chemical and mineral mapping, high resolution three-dimensional mapping and topographical features.

    The state-run ISRO launched the 514 kg mooncraft onboard the polar satellite launch vehicle on October 22, 2008 from its spaceport Sriharikota in Andhra Pradesh, about 80 km northeast of Chennai.

    The Rs 3.9-billion Chandrayaan was the first mooncraft to have confirmed the presence of water on the moon.

    After a 10-month rendezvous with the earth’s only natural satellite, the mission was terminated Aug 30, 2009 when the space agency’s Deep Space Network (DSN) at Bylalu, about 40 km from here, lost radio contact with Chandrayaan after computers onboard became non-functional.

    “Though the dedicated portal will have a catalogue of the data, specific information will be made available for students and scholars pursuing research in space exploration,” Krishna said.

    Indian space scientists are currently reviewing the voluminous data, including about 70,000 images relayed to DSN by the 10 scientific instruments Chandrayaan carried to the lunar orbit, about 100 km from the moon’s surface and over 400,000 km from the earth.

    “Our scientists from various planetary groups are beginning to peer review the data from 10 of the 11 payloads. The same will be made accessible to the public as the lock-in period for the principal investigators of the mission to analyse will end by December,” Krishna said.

    Of the 11 instruments, five were Indian and six were from the US and Europe.

    ISRO scientists have used the planetary data system, developed by the US-based National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) for preservation and utilisation of the archived information.

    “We are also in the process of generating a topographical atlas and a mineralogical atlas of the moon from the data,” Krishna noted.

    Detailed mapping of moon’s mineralogy and topography will pave way for further research possibilities.

    “We will prepare an atlas of the moon with latitude, longitude, colours of areas, ice water, minerals and terrain from the sheets of topography in the data,” Krishna added.

    Chandrayaan accomplished 95 percent of its scientific and technological objectives before its mission was called off prematurely. It had been programmed to orbit the moon for nearly two years.







    Data From Chandrayaan Moon Mission To Go Public
     
  6. Patriot

    Patriot Senior Member Senior Member

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    Chandrayaan-2 to focus on new ideas, technologies

    [​IMG]

    BANGALORE (PTI): Chandrayaan-2, the proposed second Indian mission to moon, would undertake "extremely good" experiments and try out new technologies but accommodating foreign payloads on board does not appear to be a possibility at this stage.

    The first edition of the moon odyssey had six foreign payloads and five Indian ones on board but heavy orbiter (satellite) and lander weight this time has put constraints on the Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) in terms of carry-load of instruments.

    "One of the problems was weight consideration. Weight limitation is overall boundary within which we have to work", Prof U R Rao, who chaired the national committee of experts drawn from ISRO centres, academic institutions and R&D laboratories which finalised the payloads to be flown on board Chandrayaan-2 (orbiter and rover), told PTI.

    With a heavy orbiter and lander, the weight of the payloads cannot exceed 40 kg.

    Chandrayaan-2 spacecraft weighs about 2,650 kg at lift-off of which the orbiter weight is about 1,400 kg and lander's about 1,250 kg.

    The mission, which will have an orbiter, a lander and a rover, is planned to be launched onboard Geosynchronous Satellite Launch Vehicle (GSLV) from Satish Dhawan Space Centre, Sriharikota, in 2013.

    While the lander would be provided by Russia, the orbiter and the rover are being built by ISRO.

    Prof Rao, Chairman, Advisory Committee on Space Sciences (ADCOS) and former Chairman of ISRO, said there were informal discussions with players from the US and Europe on flying their payloads, even though ISRO had not issued "availability of opportunity" for foreign instruments.

    "Right now, the weight problem is very serious", he said indicating that foreign payloads may not be included at all. "We just don’t have the weight. We cannot select payloads which cannot go".

    But Rao said one or two additional Indian payloads might be included.

    "Obviously, we will give preference to Indian payloads now. We have to provide as much opportunities as possible to Indian scientists".

    But he said the Russians would conduct experiments with their lander.

    Rao said Chandrayaan-2 would carry out experiments based on the discoveries of its predecessor. "It will conduct extremely good experiments, try out very new ideas and new technologies".

    A week ago, the committee, after detailed discussions on mission requirements, weight and power availability for scientific payloads, announced that it has recommended five payloads to be flown on the orbiter of which three are new and two are improved versions of the payloads flown earlier on Chandrayaan-1 orbiter.

    It also recommended two scientific payloads on the rover of the lunar odyssey. All the seven are Indian payloads.

    Rao said it is for the first time that India is carrying a lander and rover which would carry out in-situ experiments which are "always something of great importance".

    He pointed to the planned landing "right at the point", carrying out in-situ experiments and transmitting from the antenna on the lander.

    The US and Russia have undertaken missions involving lander and rover in the past, he said, adding, "Certainly we (India) are right there on the top".

    Rao said he was sure if China, which has the capability of sending such a mission, has done lunar landing of this type.

    Underlining the importance of the proposed moon mission
    , Rao said India has to get into the "business of landers and rovers" sooner or later.

    He indicated that the mission would contribute to enhancing knowledge as and when New Delhi decides to undertake a manned mission to moon which ISRO officials maintain could be a possibility in next ten to 15 years.

    Rao said India is seeing Chandrayaan-2 mission as an opportunity to develop new technologies in a "comprehensive way".

    ISRO officials said the five recommended payloads of the orbiter are aimed at mapping the major elements present on the lunar surface and probe the presence of water and various chemicals in the Earth's natural satellite.

    It also covers mapping of lunar surface over a wide wavelength range for the study of presence of minerals, water molecules and various chemicals, and the lunar exosphere besides preparing a three-dimensional map essential for experiments relating to lunar mineralogy and geology.

    Both the instruments on Chandrayaan-2 rover are expected to carry out elemental analysis of the lunar surface near the landing site, they added.




    Chandrayaan-2 to focus on new ideas, technologies :: Brahmand.com
     
  7. keshtopatel

    keshtopatel Regular Member

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    ISRO successfully conducts static testing of new age rocket


    [​IMG]


    GSLV-Mk III, which is currently under advanced stage of development, uses two solid strap-on boosters (S200), L110 liquid stage and a cryogenic upper stage C-25

    Six months after a failed test, the Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) successfully conducted the second static testing of its liquid core stage (L110) of Geosynchronous Satellite Launch Vehicle Mark III (GSLV Mk -III), according to a press release.

    The test lasted 200 seconds at ISRO's Liquid Propulsion Systems Centre (LPSC) test facility at Mahendragiri today (September 8, 2010) at 15:50 hrs.

    L110 is one of the heaviest earth storable liquid stages ever developed by ISRO. L110 stage had two high pressure Vikas engines in a clustered configuration. Nearly 500 health parameters were monitored during the test and the initial data acquired indicates its normal performance.

    Today’s successful test of L110 for its full flight duration of 200 seconds, is a major milestone in the earth storable liquid rocket programme of ISRO and a significant step forward in the development of GSLV-Mk III launch vehicle.

    ISRO conducted the test for 150 seconds at LPSC test facility on March 5 this year. While the test was originally targeted for 200 seconds it was stopped at 150 seconds since a deviation in one of the parameters - minor leakage in the command system - was observed.

    It may be recalled that GSLV-Mk III, which is currently under advanced stage of development, uses two solid strap-on boosters (S200), L110 liquid stage and a cryogenic upper stage C-25.

    Keywords: ISRO, GSLV Mk III, launch vehicle, liquid core stage, L110, Liquid Propulsion Systems Centre, Mahendragiri test facility.
     
  8. RAM

    RAM The southern Man Senior Member

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  9. rahulrds1

    rahulrds1 Regular Member

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    China’s space programme gears up for missions to Moon, Mars

    Source: the Hindu.com.

    China is planning giant strides into deep space exploration by sending its first lunar manned mission by 2025, a probe to Mars by 2013 and to Venus by 2015, intensifying its space race with India which also plans Moon and Sun missions.

    China’s first step toward expected to orbit the Moon, land and return to Earth by 2020, said Ye Peijian, Commander in Chief of the Chang’e (lunar landing) programme and an academic at the Chinese Academy of Sciences.

    Ye told a meeting Space scientists that China plans to launch its first manned moon landing in 2025, a probe to Mars by 2013 and to Venus by 2015.

    “China has the full capacity to accomplish Mars exploration by 2013,” Ye was quoted as saying by the state-run Global Times newspaper.

    The unmanned mission to the Moon was seen as a counter to India’s Chandrayan-1, which left its foot prints on the Moon by crashing on to the lunar surface with the tricolour, stealing a march over China by becoming the fourth country to do so after the U.S., Russia and Japan.

    China, earlier, had a head start by flying a man into space in 2003 thus becoming the third nation only after United States and the Soviet Union and Chang’e 1 was launched in 2007 which entered lunar orbit and sent pictures of the moon.

    India plans to launch its Chandrayan-II mission in 2012-13 with its Geosynchronous Satellite Launch Vehicle (GSLV), which would include a lunar orbiter to probe the moon surface for geological date and look for helium-3.

    ISRO also plans to send manned space flight by 2015 and a human moon mission by 2025 besides plans to send a satellite (Aditya) to study Sun corona with more advanced GSLV launchers.

    China has also announced plans to set up its orbital space station by 2020.

    Earlier this month, Chief Engineer overseeing China’s lunar exploration programme Wu Weiren said that work on the Chang’e-2 lunar orbiter had entered the pre-launch testing stage and it would make its first trial flight before the end of the year.

    Chang’e-2 will carry out a soft-landing test in preparation for the launch of Chang’e-3, which is scheduled for 2013. The Chang’e Project is named after a Chinese legend of a goddess who took a magic elixir and flew to the moon.

    Space-programme officials had said previously that the Chang’e-2 mission would be launched in October around the Mid Autumn Festival, dedicated to the Moon Goddess, Chang’e, but no precise date has been given.

    Ouyang Ziyuan, chief scientist of China’s lunar orbiter project, said Beijing plans to launch an orbital space station by around 2020 is achievable, based on aerospace technology development and the success of future manned missions.

    China’s space programme will pose great challenges to scientists and technicians, Mr. Ouyang said. The space station will be quite small in size compared with the International Space Station, a joint collaboration between 16 countries, including the U.S. and Russia.

    Chinese analysts, however, dismissed international concerns that Beijing is engaging in an outer-space arms race, stressing that recent activities and future missions are for scientific purposes and for the benefit of mankind.
     
  10. Patriot

    Patriot Senior Member Senior Member

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    Mars mission possible in 2030: APJ Kalam

    [​IMG]

    DEHRA DUN (PTI): Former President A P J Kalam Sunday said that India is planning to send its mission to Mars in 2030.

    "We hope that we will be able to send the mission to Mars in 2030," he said at a school function here.

    Significantly, Kalam had made a similar announcement here in 2001 regarding the Chandrayaan-I mission to the moon when he was scientific adviser to the government.

    Answering a question, he said the best way to eradicate corruption in the country is to start a campaign from the home.

    "For a nation of a billion people, if you ask your father, in case he is unfortunately corrupt, to stop corruption, this is the best way to stop corruption from the home itself. If everybody does that, then corruption will stop," Kalam told the school children.

    He said he had been asked this question earlier also at a school function and his answer at that time was the same.

    Later, Kalam also administered an oath asking the young students to fight corruption.

    To another question, Kalam said he does not believe in the brain drain theory and said the Indians used to go to other countries to acquire knowledge and wealth in the past also.

    But as times have changed, the number of IITs, IIMs and similar educational institutes is increasing and now people from foreign countries would also come to India, the former President said.

    When a student asked him the question that how is he a peace-loving person and at the same time a missileman too, Kalam said that strength is necessary to gain respect from other nations.

    He asked the students to acquire knowledge from great books and great teachers stating that "knowledge makes the man perfect."

    Reading books also plays an important role in building of characters, he said.







    http://www.brahmand.com/news/Mars-mission-possible-in-2030-APJ-Kalam/5201/1/14.html
     
  11. Patriot

    Patriot Senior Member Senior Member

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    Courting India In Space

    by Morris Jones
    Sydney, Australia (SPX) Nov 26, 2010



    It's a busy time for watching international relations in space. Then again, given the current state of international relations on Earth, it's not surprising that spaceflight looks so dynamic. We have had a short and controversial visit by the Administrator of NASA to China, and recently, new overtures of co-operation between the USA and India on several strategic and economic fronts. Spaceflight has been prominent among these.

    The main issue, at least in the short term, has been an easing of restrictions on the export of US satellites
    for launch on Indian launch vehicles. This has the potential to both delight and disappoint US space firms, some of whom will probably miss out on launch contracts to their overseas rivals.

    [​IMG]

    This article won't explore the full dynamics of this complex subject, but the move represents a major policy shift for the USA. It also suggests that other collaborative space projects could be possible in the future, if relations continue to improve.

    How should India and the USA work together in space? It's a question that can't be reasonably answered until the USA decides on exactly what it wants to do with its own space program. Right now, there are plenty of people who could provide a roadmap, but it isn't clear what the volatile mix of America's politics and economics will produce in the near future.

    Nevertheless, we can take stock of some of the current elements in play. The USA is about to retire its space shuttle fleet, but continue participation in the International Space Station
    for an extended period. It's also trying to incubate the development of a new flock of fledging private spacecraft.

    The first hatchlings are unmanned cargo carriers, but some could transform into crew transfer vehicles. America is also maintaining a robust unmanned lunar and planetary exploration program.

    India is a highly aspirational space player with a seasoned fleet of satellite buses and launch vehicles. It's pursuing an ambitious robot lunar exploration program, and hopes to fly to Mars in the near future. Most notably, India has begun the development of its own indigenous human spaceflight program, and is developing a capsule spacecraft.

    Like China, India is a major economic and space power that is not a participant in the International Space Station. China has indicated interest in joining the ISS program, but has been rebuffed. Admitting India to ISS while excluding China would be a potentially controversial step. At the present, there is no truly clear message from India or any of the existing ISS partners on where they stand on this.

    Until recently, there were plans to fly an Indian cosmonaut on a Soyuz mission, but it's curious to note that the spacecraft was never intended to dock with ISS. This would have been the first Soyuz flight without a mission to the Station since ISS began construction!

    The mission plan alone hints at the controversy of admitting India in any deeper role as an ISS partner. Russia recently announced that the joint mission has been canceled, but remains on good terms with India's space program.

    Russia is already strongly entrenched as a co-operative partner with India in spaceflight, and has already launched an Indian cosmonaut on a Soyuz mission to a Salyut space station. Russia is also providing hardware for the upcoming Chandrayaan-2 lunar mission.

    India is unlikely to reduce its co-operation with Russia in spaceflight, and this may or may not influence the way America transfers technology to India. Then again, Russia already has an advanced grasp of boosters and spacecraft technology. America may feel that anything that isn't too sensitive to be shared with India is also not too sensitive to be blocked from Russian eyes.

    Small steps would probably be a good way to start. India wants to explore the Moon and Mars. So does the USA. There has already been some co-operation in lunar exploration, with a US instrument flying on the first Indian Moon orbiter. If technology transfer issues can be resolved, it could be worth sharing more instruments.

    At the very least, there could be a pooling of scientific data, and possibly coordinated observations by Indian and US spacecraft at the same target. There was an attempt to co-ordinate some observations between India's Chandrayaan-1 lunar orbiter and America's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, but these did not work out for technical reasons.

    India also has a highly developed remote sensing capability, serving both civil and strategic interests. Exactly how or if they will interact further with America on this front is unclear. Commercial remote sensing arrangements are already quite active by both US and Indian companies.

    The ultimate prize would be co-operation in human spaceflight. This is a very fluid situation for both nations. By 2012, neither nation will have an operational astronaut transfer vehicle! India hopes to fly its own vehicle by 2015, but they will need to work rapidly if they wish to meet this very tight deadline.

    There has been some talk of co-operation with a major US aerospace firm on the development of this spacecraft, but it is not known how or if this will happen. It's not clear when the USA will field its first post-Shuttle manned spacecraft, or what it will be. There could be technology sharing on this front, or at least some effort to promote standards in docking.

    The recent release by the USA of an international standard for docking interfaces is a smart move that could shape India's thinking. This could be useful for joint missions outside of the ISS program, or allow for crew rescue in some circumstances.

    US and Indian astronauts could fly together on new space stations in Earth orbit, either as guest astronauts on US vehicles, or with US and Indian transfer vehicles both docking at the same station.

    Ultimately, both nations would love to send astronauts to the Moon. A collaborative program, possibly with other international partners, could defray the high costs of such a venture. It's probably too early to even draft a basic plan for such a mission, but visionaries in both nations are probably contemplating such a venture.







    http://www.space-travel.com/reports/Courting_India_In_Space_999.html
     
  12. black eagle

    black eagle Senior Member Senior Member

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    India to study water on Moon

    Future Chandrayaan series of India’s Moon missions will specifically study water and Helium 3 contents on the surface of Earth’s satellite.


    This was the view expressed by Sayed Maqbool Ahmed,scientist at Vikram Sarabhai Space Centre and principal scientific
    officer at the University of Hyderabad, in the city on Monday.


    Ahmed was addressing members of the Institution of Electronics and Telecommunication Engineers (IETE), Pune centre.
    Delivering a talk on Chandra’s altitudinal composition explorer (Chace) used in Chandrayaan-I, he said, “India’s lunar missions showcase our engineering and technology skills, national pride and rejuvenates young minds.”


    According to him, though imaging was difficult, Chace had provided direct evidence of water in the lunar environment.
    The scientist was of the opinion that the success of Pokhran had inspired Indian scientists to think big and resulted in missions like the Chandrayaan-I.


    Explaining Chace, Ahmed said the instrument was made to work at lunar temperatures and pass a thermo vacuum test and vibration test. Ahmed said, “Chace enabled us to realise that water on the moon was available beneath huge craters found on the southern and northern hemisphere.”


    http://www.dnaindia.com/mumbai/report_india-to-study-water-on-moon_1504856
     
  13. nitesh

    nitesh Mob Control Manager Stars and Ambassadors

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    cross post:

    http://www.thehindu.com/todays-paper/tp-national/article1713640.ece
    ISRO to build orbiter for NASA
    T.S. Subramanian


    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has asked the Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) to build an orbiter that will provide the communication between the soil samples collected from the far side of the moon and the earth, according to ISRO Chairman K. Radhakrishnan.

    This joint venture between the ISRO and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, would be part of the Moonrise missions planned by the NASA.

    ‘Planning phase'

    “This project is in the planning phase, alongside India's lunar mission programme centred on Chandrayaan-2,” he said.

    The ISRO would provide an orbiting communicator to the NASA for this mission, scheduled for 2016.

    Chandrayaan-2 would be put in an orbit around the moon by a Geo-synchronous Satellite Launch Vehicle (GSLV) in 2013 and the project would cost Rs.462 crore, Mr. Radhakrishnan said. It would be a joint mission with Russia: while the spacecraft and the rover would be built by India, the lander would be from Russia.

    The two-member committee the Centre had appointed to go into the allocation of the S-band spectrum to private company Devas by ISRO's commercial arm Antrix Corporation had submitted its report. The government would give it to the ISRO, which would act on it, he said.
     
  14. nitesh

    nitesh Mob Control Manager Stars and Ambassadors

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    Chandrayaan-2 is dealing with weight issues - Bangalore - DNA

     
  15. nitesh

    nitesh Mob Control Manager Stars and Ambassadors

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  16. Godless-Kafir

    Godless-Kafir DFI Buddha Senior Member

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    Mars by 2013? That sounds fishy, we never heard of that before.
     
  17. Chota

    Chota Regular Member

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    I hear that Chandrayaan-2 is pushed to 2016

    Unmanned Space mission by 2013..Could be SRE2 but not sure
     
  18. Illusive

    Illusive Senior Member Senior Member

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    Chandrayaan-2: India to go it alone

    Russia pulls out after one of its missions failed

    India has decided to go it alone in its second lunar mission, the Chandrayaan-2, which was originally proposed as an Indo-Russian venture.

    This was disclosed here on Monday by S.V.S. Murty of the Planetary Exploration Group of the Physical Research Laboratory (PRL), an institution under the Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) here.

    Dr. Murty was speaking on India’s lunar and Mars missions at the ongoing workshop on exoplanets at the laboratory.

    According to an agreement signed on November 12, 2007 between ISRO and Roskosmos, the Russian Federal Space Agency, ISRO had the primary responsibility to provide both the orbiter and the rover, while Roskosmos was to design and build the lander for this combined orbiter-rover-lander mission.

    However, following the failure in December 2011 of Roskosmos’ Phobos-Grunt mission, there was a delay in the construction of the Russian lander.

    The mission had a lander to return soil sample from the Martian satellite Phobos. This resulted in a complete review of technical aspects connected with the Phobos-Grunt mission, which were also used in the lunar projects such as the lander for Chandrayaan-2.

    Due to this, as well as financial problems, the Russian agency apparently expressed its inability provide the lander to meet even the revised time frame of 2015 for the Chandrayaan-2 launch.

    Dr. Murty stated that the cancellation of the Russian lander also meant that mission profile had to be marginally changed.

    The design of the indigenous lander and the preliminary configuration study was completed by the Space Applications Centre (SAC), Ahmedabad, he said.

    Chandrayaan-2 will have five primary payloads on the orbiter, two of which will be improvements on instruments that were onboard Chandrayaan-1.

    In addition, the rover too will carry two additional instruments. Chandrayaan-2 will be launched by a GSLV powered by an indigenous cryogenic engine.

    However, PRL director Jitendra Goswami clarified that this did not mean that the Indo-Russian collaboration on planetary exploration had ended. Since Chandrayaan-2 was intended to be Roskosmos’ Luna-Glob moon exploration programme, the Russian agency may join hands with ISRO in any of its lunar missions, Dr. Murty said.

    The Hindu : News / National : Chandrayaan-2: India to go it alone
     
  19. rahulrds1

    rahulrds1 Regular Member

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  20. Abhijeet Dey

    Abhijeet Dey Regular Member

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    Chandrayaan 2 to be an all-Indian programme

    The Hindu August 15, 2013

    NEW DELHI: It is now official. Chandrayaan 2, the second mission to moon, would be an all-Indian programme, without any tie-up with Russia. Minister of State in the PMO V. Narayanasamy made the announcement in reply to a written question in the Rajya Sabha on Wednesday.

    (The Hindu had reported about Indian going it alone in January itself. See thehindu.com/news/national/chandrayaan2-india-to-go-it-alone/article4329844.ece).

    Chandrayaan 2 was originally envisaged as a joint mission between the Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) and the Russian Federal Space Agency, Roscosmos. Under the agreement approved by the Union government in September 2008, ISRO was to provide its Geo-Satellite Launch Vehicle, as also the orbiter and the rover, for the launch set for this year, while Roscosmos was to chip in with the lander.

    Speaking to The Hindu , a senior ISRO official said the work on the programme was progressing apace, and the mission was likely in three years.
     
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