Cause of poor performance in Olympics

Discussion in 'Defence & Strategic Issues' started by zolpidam, Oct 6, 2009.

  1. zolpidam

    zolpidam Regular Member

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    Today India is a country of 1.2 Billion approximately , and still we cannot get even a single gold medal in Olympics (except one this year) , Why we have so much poor sport culture ?
    Is India lack of talent ?
    Is India lack of Infrastructure?
    Is their is poor administration?
    Or Their is lack or will?
    Or We love Cricket only?
     
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  3. Rage

    Rage DFI TEAM Stars and Ambassadors

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    I'll tell you why:


    - Our annual sports budget is far too meagre for a country our size compared to other countries [there are signs of that changing]. Consider for instance, that in the 2008 fiscal, the sports budget was a meagre $280-odd million. In comparison, China earmarked $2 billion for the Beijing Olympics- about 7 times that amount. We can argue that it was their 'homecoming' all day long, but the fact is that they did it- with telling success.

    - Now, a good chunk of that budget is channeled towards meeting administrative expenses and salaries of officials and coaches and bureaucrats, leaving the crucial training of athletes with the balance. The few dozen international stars that India has managed to produce: Sania Mirza, Saina Nehwaal, Leander Paes, etc. succeed inspite of, not because of, the system.

    - The problem is not a lack of talent. You and I know that, we see it all around us - this nation of a billion people has tremendous potential. But given the all-pervasive bureaucratic insensitivity, and as a consequence of that, sub-par training camps and poor infrastructure, we are reduced to selling our athletes short shrift, and seeing them 'barely make it' out of the top three instead of winning glittering guerdon. Let me quote K P Gaekwad, a former national-level athlete, who now runs his own training academy: "In India, intensive training of selected Olympians begins a few months before the start of the Games. In this last-minute scramble, athletes are sent abroad and foreign coaches hired. Is this any way to win Olympic gold?"

    - We also seem to be stuck in a time-warp when it comes to thinking about training: in recent years global sport has become particularly hi-tech, and the need for sophisticated equipment and 'auxiliary personnel' such as therapists, nutritionists and psychologists ever more important. We, on the other hand, seem to think that all a sportsman needs is a good coach and hours of practice. I know weightlifters for instance, that eat a whole chicken, half a kilo of beef, soy milk, yoghurt and a dozen eggs a day as 'staples' apart from their regular meals, thinking that 'more protein' would improve their performance, without realizing that they're consuming a horrendous amount of cholesterol. Being competitive in anything other than at a regional, South Asian or Commonwealth level will require the inclusion of adequate physicians, psychologists and nutritionists to calibrate performance to nanoseconds.

    - It is also telling, that while sports education, or P.T as we call it, is mandatory in the academic curriculum, about 40% of government-schools don't have a playground. I was lucky enough to attend a decent convent school that made us play in our physical training hour till we dropped: rugby with a makeshift ball made of school ties, soccer, running laps, leg cricket, lagori, you name it all. But the only "physical education" (in school) that most children in this country get are quasi-military-style 'drills' in the front courtyard.

    - Apart from ossified mindsets and poor facilities however, we have no long term strategy for nurturing and discovering youth. The government has done little to develop athletic facilities or invite world-class trainers and sports managers to provide sporting clinics. Most sporting stars come from the private school system, which only caters to a third of the kids in the country. These have a better system in place, but with little governmental support, are always restricted in scope and scale. We could take heed of China's success, which has exploited a rigorous and extensive sporting system, to become an olympic powerhouse.

    - And finally, the issue of management: sporting bodies in India are plagued with retired bureaucrats appointed to such 'honorary' positions, and accountable to no one, knowing very little of the sports they superintend, but rather taking advantage of the foreign junkets, international accommodation and other perks they enjoy. Replacing them with sports professionals that are dynamic and more knowledgeable will go a long way in making India a sporting power.
     
  4. Vladimir79

    Vladimir79 Defence Professionals Defence Professionals

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    Maybe because all the judges were Chinese biased. We only had 72 medals, 23 Gold which was our poorest showing since 1996. There were at least ten events I watched which should have been won or medaled by Russians that were beat out by non-performing Chinese. How the hell do they almost double their medal counts from previous Olympics, because they host it?? If that is the case we better dominate Sochi or there is some explaining to do.

    India did win Gold in 1980, but your nation seriously lacks the participation in many of these newly minted Olympic sports that I wouldn't even call sports, like speed walking. WTF?!?
     
  5. Koji

    Koji New Member

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    It's not the new ones that are the problems, but it's the traditional ones as well. Swimming, track and field, basketball, gymnastics, you name, India lacks a punch in all categories.
     
  6. NiketRC

    NiketRC Regular Member

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    India's performance in 2008 was good enough in more than 11 events we lost in quarter final , indian boxers have performed very well . For 2012 London we can hope mor medals .
     
  7. Rage

    Rage DFI TEAM Stars and Ambassadors

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    Let's be clear here: they were not good enough for a country of our stature, for a country that is trying to portray itself as a future contender - in everything from sports to geopolitics to economy and arms manufacture.

    At present, we remain competitive only at the Asian and Commonwealth levels. To take on sporting heavyweights such as the United States, Russia, Australia and China, much work will need to be done. We have the potential- that is obvious to anyone who sees Indian athletes wrestling in the sand when they should be training on wrestling mats, running on beaches because they can't afford limited track use, or training at sweaty akhadas for international competitions because a state-of-the-art gym membership is too expensive.

    That is not to say there isn't hope. Already, there are signs of things beginning to change:

    India's latest engineering goal: create Olympians
     
  8. johnee

    johnee Elite Member Elite Member

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    Not particularly.

    Yes, at all levels.

    Yes, very poor.

    There is a lack of will from GOI's POV, and also from common people on street. Not many really care about olympics, sure the medals are desirable but not a priority. Compare this to other nations that make a very disciplined attempt at the medals.

    Yep, most indians do. They dont see a point in some silly games that are part of olympics. Perhaps, including cricket in olympics would generate interest in indians about olympics.
     
  9. Vladimir79

    Vladimir79 Defence Professionals Defence Professionals

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    What ever happened to Field Hockey in India? You always used to win that.
     
  10. Rage

    Rage DFI TEAM Stars and Ambassadors

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    What else? Corruption and infighting in the bureaucracy: Two men- Jyothikumaran and Gill (who has other laurels to his credit, but makes a poor sports administrator nevertheless) were credited for "raping the sport". Media channels showed Jyothikumaran in 2008 accepting bribes for manipulating team selection to include a certain player in the national team. The IHF (Indian Hockey Federation) was suspended by the Olympics Association following that and the fracas negatively impacted on team morale. Gill has also come under pressure for his autocratic methods. Observers have noted that Gill and Kumaran barely even spoke to each other. And even the Sports minister, Manohar Singh Gill, (not to be confused with the other K.P.S. Gill) has said [if I may quote] “I have agonised long over the IHF". I believe the IHF President must also introspect and review his position. It is time to let other Indians make an attempt to lift our hockey.”

    For a country that has won eight Olympic hockey medals, it was a moment of national shame for us when we didn't even make it to the Beijing Olympics.
     

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