C16 launch successful , satellites injected into orbit

Discussion in 'Strategic Forces' started by rahulrds1, Apr 21, 2011.

  1. rahulrds1

    rahulrds1 Regular Member

    Joined:
    Aug 21, 2009
    Messages:
    800
    Likes Received:
    1,251
    PSLV-C16 launch successful, satellites injected into orbit

    Success comes after last year's GSLV failures

    Source: www.thehindu.com

    It was “sweet seventeen” for the Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle (PSLV) on Wednesday, with the PSLV-C16 scoring a spectacular success by putting three satellites into orbit with precision.

    It was the PSLV's 17th consecutive successful mission out of the 18 launches from Sriharikota. At the end of 18 minutes of “a delightful” flawless flight, the fourth stage of the rocket shot India's Resourcesat-2 into its orbit. About 40 seconds later, the fourth stage bulleted again the Youthsat and the X-sat into their orbits. The accuracy was such that the Resourcesat-2 reached an orbit at an altitude of 822.9 km against the targeted 822 km.

    The mission lifted the veil of despondency that had fallen over the Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) after the failure of the GSLV-D3 with an indigenous cryogenic stage in April last year and of the GSLV-F06 with a Russian cryogenic engine in December. This year, the ISRO was hit by allegations over the S-band spectrum allocation to a private company.

    ISRO Chairman K. Radhakrishnan called the mission “a grand success” because the satellites reached their orbits with great precision. It was “a global mission,” he said, because the Resourcesat-2's remote-sensing images would be used by countries across the world.

    Director of the Liquid Propulsion Systems Centre of ISRO S. Ramakrishnan described the success as “a sweet seventeen.”

    Director of Vikram Sarabhai Space Centre in Thiruvananthapuram P.S. Veeraraghavan said the mission's success had established the PSLV “as the most reliable and cost-effective rocket in the world.” Everything went right with the mission, and “as far as the orbits were concerned, the satellites hit the bullseye,” he added.

    The 54-hour countdown progressed without any hitch. At 10.12 a.m., the PSLV-C16 roared off from the first launch pad, climbing steadily. The rocket rode on towers of flame, tracing a parabolic path across a clear sky. One could see with naked eyes the separation of the first stage. The four stages and the strap-on booster motors ignited on time and fell into the Bay of Bengal. The rocket also performed “a dog-leg manoeuvre,” skirting the Sri Lankan territory.

    Mission Director P. Kunhikrishnan praised “the excellent performance” of the rocket's four stages and their sub-systems.

    Success comes after last year's two GSLV failures.

    It was “a reassurance to the nation' from the ISRO that the faith put in the space agency was justified.



    Our greatest glory is not in never falling, but in rising every time we fall.


    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Apr 21, 2011
  2.  
  3. Virendra

    Virendra Moderator Moderator

    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2010
    Messages:
    4,674
    Likes Received:
    2,923
    Location:
    Delhi, India, India
  4. rahulrds1

    rahulrds1 Regular Member

    Joined:
    Aug 21, 2009
    Messages:
    800
    Likes Received:
    1,251
    ISRO PSLV-C16 Information:

    Source : http://www.isro.org/pslv-c16/pslv-c16.aspx


    PSLV-C16, is the eighteenth flight of ISRO's Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle, PSLV. In this flight, the standard version of PSLV with six solid strap-on motors is used.

    PSLV-C16 will place three satellites with a total payload mass of 1404 kg - RESOURCESAT-2 weighing 1206 kg, the Indo-Russian YOUTHSAT weighing 92 kg and Singapore's X-SAT weighing 106 kg – into an 822 km polar Sun Synchronous Orbit (SSO). PSLV-C16 will be launched from the First Launch Pad (FLP) at Satish Dhawan Space Centre SHAR, Sriharikota.

    The major changes made in PSLV since its first launch include changes in strap-on motors ignition sequence, increase in the propellant loading of the first stage and strap-on solid propellant motors as well as the second and fourth stage liquid propellant motors, improvement in the performance of the third stage motor by optimising motor case and enhanced propellant loading and employing a carbon composite payload adapter.

    PSLV has also become a more versatile vehicle for launching multiple satellites in polar SSOs as well as Low Earth Orbits (LEO) and Geosynchronous Transfer Orbit (GTO). With sixteen successful launches, PSLV has emerged as the workhorse launch vehicle of ISRO and is offered for launching satellites for international customers also. During 1994-2010 period, PSLV has launched a total of 44 satellites, of which 25 satellites are from abroad and 19 are Indian satellites.
     
    Last edited: Apr 21, 2011
  5. rahulrds1

    rahulrds1 Regular Member

    Joined:
    Aug 21, 2009
    Messages:
    800
    Likes Received:
    1,251
    Three satellites in good health

    Source : http://www.thehindu.com

    The three satellites put in orbit on Wednesday by the Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle (PSLV-C16) are “absolutely fine,” officials of the Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) said on Thursday.

    The Resourcesat-2, the Youthsat and the X-Sat were in good health and working satisfactorily, they said.

    The Resourcesat-2, an advanced remote-sensing satellite, will replace the Resourcesat-1, which was put in orbit in October 2003. The Resourcesat-2 has been fitted with three sophisticated cameras, and the first images of the earth are expected on April 28. Though the Resourcesat-1's life was five years, it was still sending pictures of the earth.

    The images from the Resourcesat-2 will be useful in estimating the acreage of crops and the stress they are under, keeping a surveillance on pests, locating groundwater, identifying schools of fish in the sea, predicting the advance of glaciers, monitoring water bodies and keeping a watch on deforestation or changes in the rural and urban landscape.

    They can also be used for estimating the salinity or acidic conditions of the soil owing to the excessive use of fertilizer, and for disaster management, mapping wetlands and categorising wasteland.

    The Resourcesat-2 also carries a payload from Canada, which receives signals from ships and provides information about their location and speed. The estimated life of the satellite is five years, and its images will be used by more than 15 countries.

    The Youthsat has three payloads — one from Moscow University and two from ISRO. Together, they will help in investigating the relationship between activities in the sun and the thermosphere-ionosphere above the earth. The X-Sat of the Nangyang Technological University of Singapore is an earth-viewing satellite.

    The Resourcesat-2 is India's 18th remote-sensing satellite. A series of Indian Remote-sensing Satellites (IRS) have been put in orbit, beginning with IRS-1A in March 1988.

    “The imaging systems in the IRS series have demonstrated India's technological leadership at the global level in observing the entire earth,” an ISRO official said.

    The nine IRS in service now are the Technology Experiment Satellite, the Resourcesat-2, the Cartosat-1, 2, 2A and 2B, the Indian Mini Satellite-1, the Radar Imaging Satellite-2 and the Oceansat-2.

    They make the IRS system the largest civilian remote-sensing satellite constellation in the world.
     

Share This Page