BSF Air Wing, NTRO, ARC and other quasi-military air forces of India

Discussion in 'Indian Air Force' started by aditya g, Dec 28, 2015.

  1. aditya g

    aditya g Regular Member

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    Other than IAF, and the air arms of Army and Air Force. There are other mini 'air forces' in the country. This thread will track developments in organisation such as:

    - BSF Air Wing
    - NTRO
    - Aviation Research Centre
    - NCC Air Wing :cool1:
    - ITBP (may be formed)
    - Pawan Hans (chartered regularly for defence)
     
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  3. aditya g

    aditya g Regular Member

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    http://indiatoday.intoday.in/story/bsfs-air-wing-in-a-sorry-state-revamp-needed/1/553928.html

     
  4. Indx TechStyle

    Indx TechStyle Perfaarmance Naarmal Senior Member

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    NTRO- National Technical Research Organization
    (Cyber Warfare Wing of India).
    May this thread go well.
     
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  5. aditya g

    aditya g Regular Member

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    http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/...operation-since-1969/articleshow/50289466.cms

    http://indianexpress.com/article/explained/bsf-plane-crash-on-a-wing-and-a-prayer/

     
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  6. aditya g

    aditya g Regular Member

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    BSF Mi-17-1V in the older (much nicer) desert camo.

    Z-4104 BSF_MI17_1V,_in_TIDANG,_UTTARAKHAND[1].jpg
     
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  7. abingdonboy

    abingdonboy Senior Member Senior Member

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    BSF Mi-17 V5s (recently inducted)

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    + @aditya g bro, it is probably best not to discuss the capabilities of ARC or NRTO too much.
     
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  8. aditya g

    aditya g Regular Member

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    Found this op detail in naxal areas:

    http://epaper.timesofindia.com/Defa...e=HTML&PageLabel=9&EntityId=Ar00900&AppName=2

    New Delhi: Within three months, Maoists fired at another helicopter of the security forces in south Chhattisgarh on Wednesday. A day after nine suspected Maoists were killed in a joint operation at Kanchala forests on the Chhattisgarh-Andhra Pradesh border, the rebels targeted an MI-17 helicopter of the BSF. However, the BSF managed to evacuate the Greyhounds men, involved in the operation, from Battiguda in Chhattisgarh’s Bijapur district, close to the encounter site.

    ....

    BSF choppers went on five sorties on Wednesday to fly out 95 of around 130 Greyhounds men from the forest to their base at Bhadrachalam in Andhra Pradesh. The BSF helicopter was hit when it landed at Battiguda around 3.30 pm. “On the last sortie, we came under fire. However, we managed to fly out with 14 men,” said BSF director-general Subhash Joshi. The BSF chopper returned to the area on another sortie. “We are concerned about the security of our men and chopper. But, we will definitely perform the task assigned to us,” said Joshi.

    IAF choppers evacuated 35 security forces personnel from the area. An IAF source pointed out the imperfect sanitization of the landing area in the Maoist stronghold.

    During Tuesday’s joint operation unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) were deployed for surveillance. “UAV images showed armed men, suspected to be Maoists, forcing women and children of the village on a tractor and fleeing during the encounter,” said a senior officer. The Maoists probably used the women and children as human shield while fleeing, he claimed.
     
  9. aditya g

    aditya g Regular Member

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    Private heptrs chartered by CRPF for naxal areas. Though welcome development for troops on ground, it is really sad that our government forces are unable to muster own resources and has to charter private operators.

    GOI should ressurect the Auxilliary Air Force (AAF) - which is the TA equivalent of IAF - for such operations.

    http://www.india.com/news/india/ant...private-choppers-for-military-sorties-300867/

    New Delhi, Mar 1: The government has hired two helicopters from a private firm to provide air support to security forces deployed in the jungles of Chhattisgarh and its border areas which are hotbeds of Maoist activities. The much-awaited deployment of these air assets has come after more than a year of hectic efforts to find more helicopters for troops tackling Left-wing extremism (LWE). CRPF has inked the deal for leasing two private choppers which will not only carry troops for reinforcements but also evacuate battle causalities and supply arms and rations.

    A team of two Bell choppers has been based at Jagdalpur in the Bastar region of Chhattisgarh, which is among the worst Naxal violence-affected areas, for operations under the command of the Central Reserve Police Force (CRPF), the lead force for combating the LWE challenge. “Two private choppers have been hired on contract for aiding the forces in anti-Naxal operations. The flying machines have begun operations and will be based in south Bastar,” a senior officer said.

    The private firm which is providing the choppers has experience of operating in the Maoist-affected zones, albeit for ferrying civilians and VVIPs. “We have been operating in Chhattisgarh since 2008. This is the first time we will be helping the security forces in a full-fledged role. The sorties will be executed by the CRPF,” Ajay Veer Singh, Managing Director of the Delhi-based Dhillon Aviation Pvt Ltd, which owns the choppers, told PTI.

    The firm has deployed its own pilots and crew for the operation, repair and overhauling of the flying machines. The helicopters, while operating in these areas, will land and take-off from helipads which will be sanitised and secured by CRPF and state police. “The choppers, even though only two, will be of precious help during operations or for evacuating casualties, thereby saving numerous lives as time is at a premium in this theatre of operations. “The helicopters will also be used to provide rations and other essential items to troops in the difficult-to-reach areas of Chhattisgarh and its border areas with Odisha and Andhra Pradesh which are hotbeds of Naxal activity,” the officer said.

    CRPF has been pitching for getting more choppers to add to the existing fleet of 11 helicopters deployed for anti-Maoist operations by Indian Air Force (IAF) and the Border Security Force (BSF). With the continuous increase in the number of battalions and men in anti-Naxal operations, security forces have been facing a crunch in terms of chopper sorties for helping troops in such terrain which is marked by difficult topography dotted with thick jungles. With the addition of these two choppers, they will get about 30-40 more flying hours.

    A pair of new Mi-17-V5 military choppers are also expected to be inducted for these operations by the middle of this year after they arrive from Russia and join the BSF fleet by March. The latest Mi-series helicopters have an on-board weather radar along with state-of-the-art autopilot functions and latest night vision devices, which are not available in the existing Mi-17s. Helicopters are the most important force-multiplier when it comes to providing logistical support to the forces deployed in LWE operations.

    Modified Date: March 1, 2015 10:03 AM
     
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  10. aditya g

    aditya g Regular Member

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  11. Dogfight

    Dogfight New Member

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    I was doing some research about investment in Pawan Hans and i am really amazed to know the fact that it is best company for non scheduled air transport in India, And it is worth mentioning that there are more than four hundred other companies, Pawan Hans is 30 year old while some of other companies are lot older, So in a way its tremendous growth and i expect its more and more contributions in field of defense as well.
     
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  12. abingdonboy

    abingdonboy Senior Member Senior Member

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    Or simply have a MHA air wing serving all CAPFs (BSF, CRPF, ITBP, etc) this can even have a specilist wing to serve the NSG. Right now the BSF has its own airwing, the ITBP is raising their own, the CRPF is requiesting their own and it is just becoming a mess. Make use of economies of scale and pool resources to serve all of them.
     
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  13. aditya g

    aditya g Regular Member

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    https://www.amazon.com/India-Charm-Offensive-Expat-Jungle/dp/0692546979

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    In "India Charm Offensive" the author offers a lighthearted recount of time spent adventuring through exotic India, flying helicopters for a company contracted to its paramilitary forces.

    Having no success avoiding disease, toxic moonshine and lava spiced curry, he also had to survive homicidal drivers, jungle dwelling rebels and, at times, rifle fire. Despite routine encounters with mayhem and death, he also found something approaching charm. Not in the culture of chaos, but in the dark eyes of a mahila, who called India home.

    Beauty and Bedlam Collide in East India.

    "Sir! Go up, go up, go up!" shouted Babeesh, my crew chief, with big saucer eyes and betel nut juice down his chin. "You need to go up!"

    Lurching forward in the seat next to me, he thrust his filthy pointy-finger at the ground. His words quickly smothered by what sounded like we’d hit a sudden pelting hailstorm, though we flew through cloudless sky.

    The rifle-toting troopers in back were shouting too. Although shouting in Hindi, it was clear they also wished for me to go up. Adding my vote made the count unanimous. But an Apollo rocket we were not; as the rotor blades clawed at the loose, humid air, we only gained altitude at a rate just better than a tethered balloon.

    "Those buggers are shooting at us," I said. "We’re being shot at." Not that anyone onboard needed this illuminating observation.

    There seemed to be no shooting from the south, so, banking the helicopter nearly on its side, I angled away in that direction, and the helicopter slowly—too slowly—climbed.
     

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