Britain blamed for Indian Malaysians' 'plight' in ex-colony

Discussion in 'Religion & Culture' started by hello_10, Nov 26, 2012.

  1. hello_10

    hello_10 Tihar Jail Banned

    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2012
    Messages:
    1,880
    Likes Received:
    670
    Location:
    unconfirmed
    Britain blamed for Indian Malaysians' 'plight' in ex-colony
    IANS Jun 30, 2012

    LONDON: An exiled Indian Malaysian human rights lawyer plans to file a lawsuit against the British government for failing to provide adequate safety to the community under the rule of Malay-Muslim majority when independence was granted to the former colony.

    London-based Waytha Moorthy claims that the then British Harold MacMillian's government failed to provide protection to Indian Malaysians when independence was granted to the former colony in 1957.

    The 46-year-old lawyer was expected to re-issue a class action lawsuit at the High Court Monday. He is claiming a sum of $1 million in compensation for each one of Malaysia's 1.8 million Indians.

    Originally launched in 2007, but never heard and now out of time, Moorthy's claim is on behalf of Indian Malaysians who he said face human rights abuses and live unprotected and in "continuous colonisation".

    The then British government gave the Muslim population special rights and privileges, effectively establishing a system of apartheid ever since, he said in a statement.

    "In India, at the time of partition, the British government gave rights to minorities.

    "In Malaysia, minority racial and religious groups were hung out to dry. The result is that 45 percent of the population is still being marginalised, humiliated and discriminated against when it comes to jobs, education and finance," said Moorthy, chair of HINDRAF, an NGO advocating equal rights for Indian Malaysians.

    The organisation is banned in Malaysia and Moorthy has been jailed on numerous occasions in that country.

    Britain blamed for Indian Malaysians' 'plight' in ex-colony - Times Of India
     
  2.  
  3. hello_10

    hello_10 Tihar Jail Banned

    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2012
    Messages:
    1,880
    Likes Received:
    670
    Location:
    unconfirmed
    Ethnic and religious discrimination big challenge for Malaysia's minorities
    25 May 2011, By Farah Mihlar

    Minority Rights Group International : Comment & analysis : Ethnic and religious discrimination big challenge for Malaysia's minorities

    Malaysia prides itself on being a multi-cultural Muslim country. Its majority population are Malays in ethnicity who follow the Islamic religion. Some eight percent are Indians and about 40 percent Chinese. These ethnic groups profess different religions including Hinduism, Buddhism, Taoism, Sikhism, and Christianity. The country also has a significant indigenous population known as Orang Asli.

    While most of these communities live peacefully in Malaysia and are able to develop their lives and enjoy their rights, there remain a host of serious issues affecting minorities. These are human rights violations affecting people because of both their ethnic and religious identities.

    During a recent visit to Kuala Lumpur the MCCBCHST (Malaysian Consultative Council of Buddhism, Christianity, Hinduism, Sikhism and Taoism) helped organise interviews with religious leaders and activists, who discussed some of the main issues affecting minorities.

    When Malaysia's economy took off in the 80's, leading the way as one of South East Asia's tiger economies, the country also brought in several policies privileging the majority community. Popularly known as ‘Bumiputera' or ‘son of the soil' these policies favour the Malay community over others

    Activists explained that the policies are not always blatantly discriminatory, but they can be very subtle and impact every area of life including citizenship.

    ‘Though on paper citizenship is available for everyone, non-Malays seem to take a longer time to get citizenship', says Reverend Dr. Thomas Philips, of the Christian Federation of Malaysia (CFM).

    If you are Muslim immigrant you are more easily able to get citizenship than if you are not. Spouses of non-Muslim Malaysians who come from other countries find particularly frustrating to get citizenship.

    ‘Malay' as an ethnicity is intrinsically linked to Islam, together with other criteria such as adhering to Malay culture (which arguably minorities also do) and having a Malay grandparent. The main defining factor is religion.


    Ethnic discrimination in education and employment

    In education and in certain professions, Malays are favoured through quota systems. Malaysia is one of the few countries in the world where the ethnic majority community benefits from quotas.

    ‘The Judiciary, the civil service and the Police do not reflect the racial composition of the nation,' Reverend Dr. Thomas Philips says.

    Places in prestigious residential schools in Malaysia are offered only to Malay students, while across the country Malays are given a quota to enable them to have better access and to progress well to tertiary education.

    ‘It is a deliberate policy of one race dominating public service and education. In other countries minorities get special rights, not here. It is very difficult for minorities to survive here,' says Sardar V. Harcharan Singh of the Malaysian Gurdwaras Council (MGC).

    As religion is so closely connected to ethnicity and nationalism in Malaysia, discrimination is not just on racial grounds but on religious as well.

    Non-Muslims face serious issues of discrimination simply because of their religious beliefs.



    Impact of Islamic law on non-Muslims

    Conversion for a Muslim, for example, is a major problem in Malaysia. If a Muslim wants to renounce Islam, he or she has to go through a long and painful legal process. Different courts have adopted procedures including sending people to months of rehabilitation before allowing them to do so. There have also been cases where individuals have been charged with apostasy and face criminal charges.

    Increasingly now the courts are referring cases to Islamic, Sharia courts, which have a strict religious interpretation of the law as compared to the secular interpretation in national level courts.

    In May 2007 Malaysia's highest court ruled that Lina Joy, an ethnic Malay Muslim who wanted to convert to Christianity, should get permission from an Islamic court to be recognised a Christian, even though she had been practicing Christianity for 15 years.

    ‘If you want to convert to Islam it is a matter of a few minutes and the authorities will even give you a financial allowance,'
    says Sardar V. Harcharan Singh of the Malaysian Gurdwaras Council (MGC)

    The stringent laws on religious conversion involving Islam have a major impact in cases of inter-marriage. Muslims cannot marry non-Muslims in practice. Although there is an exception for Muslim men to marry ‘Kitabiyah' (people of the book), the definition of a ‘Kitabiyah' in Malaysia is almost impossible to prove (where for example a woman must prove she is Christian and her ancestors were Christian before the prophethood of Muhammad). A non-Muslim must therefore convert to Islam to marry a Muslim.:troll:

    Muslims marry under Shariah law, while non-Muslims marry under common law. Another problem that has arisen is in cases where one spouse in a non-Muslim marriage converts to Islam. The Islamic religious officials argue that infant children in such a marriage are also automatically converted to Islam and the non-Muslim spouse loses his or her rights to guardianship and custody of the children. As under Muslim law a man can have up to four wives it is not uncommon for non-Muslim men to convert to Islam to be able to marry for a second time without divorcing their first wife. Although minority rights activists argue that such marriages are bigamous and contrary to the law, no prosecutions have ever been made.

    According to information provided by MCCBCHST, in May, 2006, Saravanan Thangatoray, who had for some time been estranged from his wife Subashini, told her that he had converted to Islam. He told her she could have nothing more to do with her elder child, who was just three years old and took the child into his custody. Despite being married under civil law, Subashini's husband applied for a dissolution of their Hindu marriage in an Islamic court.

    The High Court, the Court of Appeal and the Federal Court all refused Subashini a substantive injunction to stop the Islamic court proceedings. This effectively forced her to deal with the Islamic court even though she was not a Muslim. The Courts also held that the consent of only one parent was necessary to convert a child to Islam.

    ‘The Constitution says Sharia court has jurisdiction only over people who profess Islam. Sharia court is under the law inferior to the High Court, but because of their religious role they make it in a way that they are higher,' Sardar Jagir Singh of the Malaysian Gurdwaras Council (MGC) says.

    In 2009 the government issued a policy statement against child conversions. This policy statement has not been translated into law, and in reality, minority rights activists say, infant children are still being unilaterally converted to Islam by only one parent without the other's consent or knowledge.

    ‘How can religion claim exclusivity of words'

    In the 80's legislation was passed banning the use by non-Muslims of several words considered Islamic. This included the reference to God commonly used by Muslims, which is ‘Allah'. However, the equivalent word for God in the Malay language (which is also the official national language of the country) is also Allah.

    In 2009, there were violent attacks on churches over the usage of the term ‘Allah' after a High Court ruling that the Catholic Church could use the term in the Malay language version of their newsletter, distributed only to Catholics. Several Bibles published in the Malay language were seized by Malaysian customs authorities. Earlier in 2011, the Malaysian authorities announced that they would finally release the Bibles.

    Because of the violence, the Catholic Church came to an agreement not to use the term until the appellate courts had dealt with the matter. However, the discriminatory effect of those laws affect other religions such as Sikhs, which also refers to God as ‘Allah'. According to MCCBCHST there are at least 30 other countries in the world where the world Allah is used by both Christians and Muslims.

    ‘How can any religion claim exclusivity of words? It is a freedom of expression issue,' says Reverend Dr. Thomas Philips.

    Malaysia has also imposed restrictions on building places of worship. While a mosque can be built in any neighbourhood - Muslim or non-Muslim - any other religious place of worship can not be built within 100 meters of a Muslim neighbourhood. There are also other regulations such as; the place of worship cannot be above a certain height and cannot resemble a mosque. The latter rule again affects the Sikh community, which builds domes for their places of worship.

    All across Malaysian towns and cities there are many non-Muslim places of religious worship that can be found. However, for new places of worship being built, activists say, the procedures and processes to build is getting tougher causing delays and resulting in some projects being abandoned.

    Non-Muslim religious leaders in Malaysia are not asking for any special privileges or protection. They are simply asking not to be persecuted or discriminated against because of their religious and racial differences. What they ask for is not something new, it is what the founders of Malaysia envisioned when the country's Constitution was written.

    Article 3(1) of the Constitution says that the religion of the Federation is Islam, but provides that ‘other religions may be practised in peace and harmony in any part of the Federation.' Article 8 (1) provides for equality before the law for all persons. Article 11(1) gives every person the right to profess and practice his or her religion.

    Religious leaders such as Fr. Phillips simply ask that these constitutional provisions be respected and upheld.

    For pictures of religious leaders and activists who participated in the discussion see. Find pictures of Buddhist and Hindu places of religious worship here.


    Religious leaders who participated in the discussion:

    1) Reverend Dr. Thomas Philips - Christian Federation of Malaysia (CFM)

    2) Mr. Prematilaka KD Serisena - Sasana Abhiwurdhi Wardana Society (SAWS)

    3) Sardar V. Harcharan Singh - Malaysian Gurdwaras Council (MGC)

    4) Daozhang Ng Chek - Federation of Taoist Associations Malaysia (FTAM)

    5) Sardar Jagir Singh - Malaysian Gurdwaras Council (MGC)

    6) Venerable Ming Ji - Malaysian Buddhist Association (MBA)

    7) Venerable Sing Kan - Malaysian Buddhist Association (MBA)

    8) Ms. Sally Chee Lai Yan - Malaysian Buddhist Association (MBA)

    9) Mr. SO. Paramsothi - Malaysia Hindu Sangam (MHS)

    Minority Rights Group International : Comment & analysis : Ethnic and religious discrimination big challenge for Malaysia's minorities
     
  4. KS

    KS Bye bye DFI Veteran Member

    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2010
    Messages:
    8,008
    Likes Received:
    5,718
    Location:
    irrelevant
    Bull ----ing shit. The Brits have very little to do with the racist crap the Malays spew out. And that shit is not limited to the ethnic Tamils but also to the Muslim Shias.
     
    hello_10, W.G.Ewald and parijataka like this.
  5. Tolaha

    Tolaha Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2009
    Messages:
    2,158
    Likes Received:
    1,404
    Location:
    Bengaluru
    The entire spectrum actually, including the Chinese Malays. Malaysia happens to be the country where the majority has to be protected from the minorities and provided reservations.
     
    parijataka, SPIEZ and hello_10 like this.
  6. hello_10

    hello_10 Tihar Jail Banned

    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2012
    Messages:
    1,880
    Likes Received:
    670
    Location:
    unconfirmed
    What Discrimination? There is One MALAYSIA
    From the Wall Street Journal:

    "In 1969, race riots between Malays and ethnic-Chinese Malaysians prompted the country's predominantly Malay leaders to introduce affirmative-action-style policies to give a leg up to the Malay population.

    The original goal was to help Malays catch up economically with ethnic-Chinese Malaysians, who comprise around a fourth of the country's 27 million people but who control a disproportionately large share of businesses and trade. To do so, the government created a series of state investment vehicles to buy into key parts of the Malaysian economy. Officials hoped that private Malay entrepreneurs would eventually emerge to take control."

    "Considering that the Indians arrived in Malaysia as near-slaves and performed all the most undesirable work, if anyone should have been beneficiaries of affirmative action, it should have been the Indo-Malaysians.

    To go on and on about the "poverty" of the "boomiputras" while ignoring the far greater historic and present disadvantages of the Indo-Malaysian is simply a cover for closet racism and religious chauvinism and intolerance (since the vast majority of Indo-Malays are Hindus). In fact, as the Star Online (Sep 30, 2005) revealed, Indians continue to earn much less than the national average. Several poor Indian families survive on less than 4$ a day (i.e. less than a third of the average per capita income)."

    "We give the Wall Street Journal a thumbs up for writing about race-based discrimination in Malaysia, but a much bigger thumbs down for calling it “affirmative action.”

    "To give you a brief background, Malysia is 71% Malyasian and 29% other ethnic, but the minority way outperform Malaysians at things such as making money and attending college, in much the way that whites outperform blacks in the United States, with the difference being that the Indians and Chinese are the major minorities in Malaysia."

    "This situation flies in the face one of the standard explanation for black underperformance in the United States, that discrimination against blacks by the majority prevents them from doing well. In Malaysia, there is legalized discrimination against the minority, but the minority just keep continuing to outperform the Malays."

    "The Wall Street Journal shouldn’t be calling this situation in Malaysia “affirmative action.” To the extent that affirmative action is legitimately different than racial discrimination, it should be applied to a majority giving a helping hand to an underperforming minority. When the majority discriminates against the minority, that’s just old fashioned racial discrimination like the kind we abolished in the Jim Crow South."

    Taken from Australian Newspaper

    "This list is a common knowledge to a lot of Malaysians, especially those non-Malays (Chinese, Ibans, Kadazans, Orang Asli, Tamils, etc.) who have been racially discriminated against.."

    Dayakbaru: “Make a mental comparison of where standing could be in this list”.

    Figures in this list are merely estimates, so please take it as a guide only.

    The government of Malaysia has the most correct figures. Is government of Malaysia too ashamed to publish their racist acts by publishing racial statistics?

    This list covers a period of about 48 years since independence (1957).

    List of racial discriminations ( Malaysia ):

    (1) Of the five major banks, only one is multi-racial, the rest are controlled by Malays.

    (2) 99% of Petronas directors are Malays.

    (3) 3% of Petronas employees are Chinese.

    (4) 99% of 2000 Petronas gasoline stations are owned by Malays.

    (5) 100% all contractors working under Petronas projects must be of Bumis status.

    (6) 0% of non-Malay staff are legally required in Malay companies. But there must be 30% Malay staffs in Chinese companies.

    (7) 5% of all new intake for government police, nurses, army, are non-Malays.

    (8) 2% is the present Chinese staff in Royal Malaysian Air Force (RMAF), a drop from 40% in 1960.

    (9) 2% is the percentage of non-Malay government servants in Putrajaya, but Malays make up 98%.

    (10) 7% is the percentage of Chinese government servants in the entire government (in 2004); a drop from 30% in 1960.

    (11) 95% of government contracts are given to Malays.

    (12) 100% all business licensees are controlled by Malay government, e..g. Taxi permits, Approved permits, etc.

    (13) 80% of the Chinese rice millers in Kedah had to be sold to Malay controlled Bernas in 1980s. Otherwise, life is made difficult for Chinese rice millers.

    (14) 100 big companies set up, owned and managed by Chinese Malaysians were taken over by government, and later managed by Malays since 1970s, e.g. UTC, UMBC, MISC, Southern Bank etc..

    (15) At least 10 Chinese owned bus companies (throughout Malaysia in the past 40 years) had to be sold to MARA or other Malay transport companies due to rejection by Malay authorities to Chinese applications for bus routes and rejection for their applications for new buses..

    (16) Two Chinese taxi drivers were barred from driving in Johor Larkin bus station. There are about 30 taxi drivers and three were Chinese in Oct. 2004. Spoiling taxi club properties was the reason given.

    (17) 0 non-Malays are allowed to get shop lots in the new Muar bus station (Nov.. 2004).

    (18) 8000 billion ringgit is the total amount the government channeled to Malay pockets through ASB, ASN, MARA, privatization of government agencies, Tabung Haji etc, through NEP over a 34 years period.

    (19) 48 Chinese primary schools closed down from 1968 – 2000.

    (20) 144 Indian primary schools closed down from 1968 – 2000.

    (21) 2637 Malay primary schools built from 1968 – 2000.

    (22) 2.5% is government budget for Chinese primary schools. Indian schools got only 1%, Malay schools got 96.5%.

    (23) While a Chinese parent with RM1000 salary (monthly) cannot get school textbook loan, a Malay parent with RM2000 salary is eligible.

    (24) All 10 public university vice chancellors are Malays.

    (25) 5% of the government universities’ lecturers are of non-Malay origins. This percentage has been reduced from about 70% in 1965 to only 5% in 2004.

    (26) Only 5% has been given to non-Malays for government scholarships in over 40 years.

    (27) 0 Chinese or Indians were sent to Japan and Korea under the ‘Look East Policy.’

    (28) 128 STPM Chinese top students could not get into the course to which they aspired, i.e. Medicine (in 2004).

    (29) 10% quotas are in place for non-Bumi students for MARA science schools beginning in 2003, but only 7% are filled. Before that it was 100% Malays.

    (30) 50 cases in which Chinese and Indian Malaysians are beaten up in the National Service program in 2003.

    (31) 25% of the Malaysian population was Chinese in 2004, a drop from 45% in 1957.

    (32) 7% of the Malaysian population is Indian (2004), a drop from 12% in 1957.

    (33) 2 million Chinese Malaysians have emigrated in the past 40 years.

    (34) 0.5 million Indian Malaysians have emigrated overseas.

    (35) 3 millions Indonesians have migrated to Malaysia and become Malaysian citizens with Bumis status.

    (36) 600,000 Chinese and Indian Malaysians with red IC were rejected repeatedly when applying for citizenship in the past 40 years. Perhaps 60% of them had already passed away due to old age. This shows racism, based on how easily Indonesians got their citizenships compared with the Chinese and Indians.

    (37) 5% – 15% discount for a Malay to buy a house, regardless whether the Malay is rich or poor.

    (38) 2% is what new Chinese villages get, compared with 98% – what Malay villages got for rural development budget.

    (41) 0 temples/churches were built for each housing estate. But every housing estate got at least one mosque/surau built.

    (42) 3000 mosques/surau were built in all housing estates throughout Malaysia since 1970. No temples or churches are required to be built in housing estates.

    (43) 1 Catholic church in Shah Alam took 20 years to apply to have a building constructed. But they were told by Malay authority that it must look like a factory and not like a church. As of 2004 the application still have not been approved.

    (44) 1 publishing of Bible in Iban language banned (in 2002).

    (45) 0 of the government TV stations (RTM1, RTM2, TV3) are directors of non-Malay origin.

    (46) 30 government produced TV dramas and films always showed that the bad guys had Chinese faces, and the good guys had Malay faces. You can check it out since 1970s. Recent years, this has become less of a tendency.

    (47) 10 times, at least, Malays (especially Umno) had threatened to massacre the Chinese Malaysians using May 13, since 1969.

    (48) 20 constituencies won by DAP would not get funds from the government to develop. These Chinese majority constituencies would be the last to be developed.

    (49) 100 constituencies (parliaments and states) had been racially re-delineated so Chinese votes were diluted for Chinese candidates. This is one of the main reasons why DAP candidates have consistently lost in elections since the 1970s. (update to 2008 needed)

    (50) Only 3 out of 12 human rights items are ratified by the Malaysian government since 1960.

    (51) 0 – elimination of all forms of racial discrimination (UN Human Rights) has not been ratified by Malaysian government since 1960s.

    (52) 20 reported cases whereby Malay ambulance attendances treated Chinese patients inhumanely, and Malay government hospital staffs purposely delayed attending to Chinese patients in 2003. Unreported cases may be 200.

    (54) 20 cases every year whereby Chinese drivers who accidentally knocked down Malays were seriously assaulted or killed by Malays.

    (55) 12% is what ASB/ASN got per annum while banks fixed deposits are only about 3.5% per annum.

    There are hundreds more examples of racial discrimination in Malaysia to add to this list of ‘colossal’ racism. It is hoped that the victims of racism will write in to help expose this situation.

    The Malaysian government should publish statistics showing how much Malays had benefited from the ’special rights’ of Malays and at the same time release the statistics which show how minority races are being discriminated against.

    Hence, the responsibility lies in the Malaysia government itself to publish unadulterated statistics of racial discrimination.

    If the Malaysia government hides the statistics above, then there must be some evil doings, immoral doings, shameful doings and sinful doings, like the Nazis, going on with the non-Malays of Malaysia .

    Civilized nations, unlike the evil Nazis, must publish statistics to show its treatment of its minority races. This is what Malaysia must publish.

    We are asking for the publication of the statistics showing how ‘implementation of special rights of Malays’ had inflicted colossal racial discrimination onto non-Malays.

    Many a doctrine is like a window pane. We see truth through it but it divides us from truth. I love you when you bow in your mosque, kneel in your temple, pray in your church. For you and I are sons of one religion, and it is the spirit.
    Kahlil Gibran

    Realm of the Keeper's Heart: What Discrimination? There is One MALAYsia
     
    balai_c likes this.
  7. hello_10

    hello_10 Tihar Jail Banned

    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2012
    Messages:
    1,880
    Likes Received:
    670
    Location:
    unconfirmed
    Discrimination against non-Muslims in Malaysia

    A revealing summary of how non-Muslims in supposedly moderate Malaysia still are denied equality of rights with Muslims. From Biography.ms, with thanks to Bamsterkins:

    The constitution of Malaysia provides for freedom of religion, although Islam is the official religion. However, there exist certain laws and practices which in effect discriminate against non-Muslims in Malaysia....

    In September 2001, the then Prime Minister, Tun Dr. Mahathir bin Mohamad declared that the country was an Islamic state (negara Islam). The opposition leader at the time, Lim Kit Siang, is actively seeking support to declare Mahathir's move as unconstitutional by repeatedly clarifying that Malaysia is a secular state with Islam as its official religion as enshrined in the Constitution. However, the coalition government headed by Mahathir at the time held more than two-thirds of the seats in parliament. It requires a two-thirds majority vote for constitutional amendments in Malaysia. No proposed constitutional amendments by the Barisan Nasional government have ever failed to pass parliament since the Barisan Nasional came into power in 1957 until the time of the remarks.

    Government funds support an Islamic religious establishment (the Government also grants limited funds to non-Islamic religious communities), and it is official policy to "infuse Islamic values" into the administration of the country.

    The nation mantains two parallel justice systems in the country. One is the conventional justice system based upon laws gazetted by parliament. The other is syariah or Islamic law. Ostensibly syariah courts only have jurisdiction over persons who declare themselves to be Muslims. Consequently, this results in non-Muslims not having legal standing in syariah courts. Where decisions of the syariah court affect a non-Muslim, she can seek recourse in the secular courts who theoretically trump the syariah courts. However, this has often resulted in complications.

    The rules of Syaria are set by the various sultans of the states. Historically a sultan had absolute authority over the state. Prior to independence Tunku Abdul Rahman got the sultans to cede authority to the federal government. One of the terms of this agreement is that the sultans still are the ultimate authority of Islamic law in their respective states.

    Constitutionally, one of the four tests for being Malay in Malaysia is that one must be a Muslim. Therefore, all Malays are regarded to fall under Islamic law. The rationale for this is that Islam is considered intrinsic to Malay ethnic identity.

    Discrimination against non-Muslims in Malaysia - Jihad Watch
     
  8. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

    Joined:
    Apr 17, 2009
    Messages:
    43,118
    Likes Received:
    23,543
    Location:
    Somewhere
    The Chinese control the economy of Malaysia.

    It can never be a true Islamic State, even if the Govt loads everything in favour of the Bhumputras
     
  9. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

    Joined:
    Apr 17, 2009
    Messages:
    43,118
    Likes Received:
    23,543
    Location:
    Somewhere
    In the 1970s, the Malaysian government implemented policies which are racially discriminatory designed to favour bumiputras (including affirmative action in public education) to create opportunities, and to defuse inter-ethnic tensions following the extended violence against Chinese Malaysians in the 13 May Incident in 1969.[1] These policies have succeeded in creating a significant urban Malay middle class. They have been less effective in eradicating poverty among rural communities. This policy has caused a backlash of resentment from excluded groups, in particular the sizeable Chinese and Indian Malaysian minorities.

    At the 2004 annual general assembly of the United Malays National Organisation, which is the largest member of the governing coalition, deputy chair Badruddin Amiruldin cautioned against questioning the Bumiputras' special rights, which met with approval from the delegates: "Let no one from the other races ever question the rights of Malays on this land. Don’t question the religion because this is my right on this land."

    Another controversial aspect is that the Orang Asli of peninsular Malaysia are not considered Bumiputra under the Federal constitution. As their settlement predates that of the Malays, this is considered by many, that Bumiputra is about the promotion one religion over another, especially since Orang Asli are much worse off than Muslim Malays.

    Members of the Indian community have also been vocal in demonstrating for Hindu rights and protesting that their community has long been worse off than the Malay community, a situation compounded by unfavorable treatment as non-Bumiputras.





    ****************************


    Bumiputera-ness: who decides?

    MINISTER in the Prime Minister’s Department Datuk Seri Mohamed Nazri Abdul Aziz’s recent assertion respecting the bumiputera-ness of Siamese Malaysians piques my interest to no end.

    Who or what decides on the bumiputera-ness or the bumiputera-less-ness of a Malaysian citizen? Is it the Federal Constitution? Was it the Reid Commission? Is it the cabinet, or Parliament, or the Barisan Nasional? Is it Umno? Or Perkasa?

    My great-grandparents were born in Penang in the 19th century. They were salted-fish traders. In World War II, their mansions in town were expropriated by the Japanese and turned into barracks. I know for a fact that their blood, sweat and tears oozed into their native soil of Malaya.

    My grandparents and parents had nothing to do with China. They contributed to Malaya and Malaysia and all facets of Malaysian-ness. That they and I were/are not qualified to be bumiputera Malaysians is simply illogical. Anywhere else in the world, one’s citizenship would be the ultimate and consummate qualification of one’s citizenry.

    Here I am, a full-blooded Malaysian, and yet, somehow, a designated non-Malay and non-bumiputera Malaysian. Is it possible that my children’s children will also end up like I have – a stipulated non-bumiputera 1Malaysian?

    Bumiputera-ness: who decides? | The Nut Graph

    ******************************************
     
    hello_10 likes this.
  10. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

    Joined:
    Apr 17, 2009
    Messages:
    43,118
    Likes Received:
    23,543
    Location:
    Somewhere
    To identify citizens that qualify for the status of Bumiputra, Malaysia requires citizens to carry a national identification card called MyKad. Smart Cards identify citizens by race and religion.Under Article 160 of the Constitution of Malaysia a Malay is defined as being:

    - a Malaysian citizen born to a Malaysian citizen who professes to be a Muslim - habitually speaks the Malay language - adheres to Malay customs - and is domiciled in Malaysia or Singapore.

    However, opting out of the system is a different matter as demonstrated by Lina Joy's six year court battle. Joy's request to change the religion listed on her MyKad was denied by Malaysia's Supreme Court in 2007.

    "Malaysia's constitution guarantees freedom of worship but says all ethnic Malays are Muslim. Under Sharia law, Muslims are not allowed to convert. " Any Western Malaysian citizen apparently can opt into the system simply by proclaiming him/herself to being Muslim.

    Wiki
     
    hello_10 likes this.
  11. amoy

    amoy Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jan 17, 2010
    Messages:
    5,519
    Likes Received:
    1,544
    The Malay Dilemma - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    The Malay Dilemma is a controversial book written by Mahathir bin Mohamad in 1970
     
  12. hit&run

    hit&run Elite Member Elite Member

    Joined:
    May 29, 2009
    Messages:
    5,492
    Likes Received:
    4,667
    H&R's thought of the day.

    If you do not carry an appropriate, an adequate nuisance value people do not look after you.
     
    hello_10 and W.G.Ewald like this.
  13. hello_10

    hello_10 Tihar Jail Banned

    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2012
    Messages:
    1,880
    Likes Received:
    670
    Location:
    unconfirmed

    sir, Malaysia is no different, if you are a Muslim then its all easy there, migration etc. and even if you convert into a Muslim, you still have a chance. Bhumiputras around 65% of total population, and they keep every power to Muslims only. whether any high position in Malaysia, even captain of sports teams, even the head of a Malaysian company need to be a Muslim, as per their laws :toilet:
     
  14. natarajan

    natarajan Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jul 28, 2009
    Messages:
    2,592
    Likes Received:
    750
    why muslims always prefers secularism only when they are in minority but oppose it when they form majority
     
    wolfpackx1 and Vishwarupa like this.
  15. hello_10

    hello_10 Tihar Jail Banned

    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2012
    Messages:
    1,880
    Likes Received:
    670
    Location:
    unconfirmed

    considering the current state of Indian origins in Malaysia, yesterday i reminded my statement on the Independence of India, how are got our Independence and what does it mean for us, to all the Indians regardless any religion/ race/ language/ state etc, as below. the true sense "Independence", which the Indians based in Malaysia couldn't get yet, which you all are celebrating here in India, as below :india:

     
    Last edited: Aug 16, 2013
  16. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

    Joined:
    Apr 17, 2009
    Messages:
    43,118
    Likes Received:
    23,543
    Location:
    Somewhere
    That is right.

    One of my relations converted to marry a Muslim and now he is a Haji and has a roaring business.
     
  17. hello_10

    hello_10 Tihar Jail Banned

    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2012
    Messages:
    1,880
    Likes Received:
    670
    Location:
    unconfirmed

    But here i must state that Malaysia is still a much better place for its minorities as compare to many other Asian nations, mainly Muslim majority nations.:malaysia: and if you want to see a real picture, how minorities are being eliminated from the Muslims nations then first have a look on Pakistan and Bangladesh, which were part of British India before 1947 too, as below. Pakistan is almost finish with non-Muslim minorities like Hindu/Sikhs, and now they have targeted minorities within the Muslims itself, like Shia/Ahmadis etc as below. while condition of minorities living in Bangladesh is also mentioned in the thread as below too :facepalm:

    => http://defenceforumindia.com/forum/...-bangladesh-has-turned-assam-explosive-2.html


    population of Hindus was around 88% at the time of freedom of India, while its now 80%, and minorities grew in India from 12% to 20% to its population now. while first Pakistani minorities are no more on counting, and minority Hindus/Buddhists got their population reduction in Bangladesh, as below :toilet:


    I just meant to say that, "discrimination" with the minorities in Malaysia is similar to rest of the Muslim countries, but at least there is no 'clean up' operation of minorities in Malaysia, like how we find in Pakistan/ Bangladesh which were in fact part of India before 1947 :toilet:

     
    Last edited: Aug 16, 2013
  18. hello_10

    hello_10 Tihar Jail Banned

    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2012
    Messages:
    1,880
    Likes Received:
    670
    Location:
    unconfirmed
    double post
     
  19. Tshering22

    Tshering22 Sikkimese Saber Senior Member

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2010
    Messages:
    4,404
    Likes Received:
    2,783
    Location:
    Gangtok, Sikkim, India
    Wherever there is the 'Religion of Peace', there is always a problem. From US to Philippines and from India to Sweden, every non-Muslim is suffering.
     
    wolfpackx1, hello_10 and W.G.Ewald like this.
  20. hello_10

    hello_10 Tihar Jail Banned

    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2012
    Messages:
    1,880
    Likes Received:
    670
    Location:
    unconfirmed

    Hindus are punished for being Hindus, in India too

    sir, its not just Malaysia and many other countries, Hindus are being punished for being Hindus in India itself, even if they are in 80% population. population of Hindus was around 88% in 1947 while its now even below 80%, then its all about the most liberal society of the world, the Hindu community. and it has become its weakness too. just have a look on the number of financial initiatives to support minority Sikhs, Muslims, Christians, Buddhists etc as they are not Hindus :toilet:. now in India, if you are not a Hindu then you may have many advantages, funds to support businesses, loans etc, but if you are a Hindu then you may lose them :tsk: :facepalm:

    even if population of Hindus is still around 80%, India is a non-religious country with sharing equal rights and more opportunities for the weak part of society like Women/ Dalits in terms of reservations etc. no matter which family you belong to, of any religion/ language/ state etc, you may have the highest position in India if you qualify the exams. India may proud to say that even if its a Hindu majority country, it had many minority president and PMs, governors, chief justice, chief ministers, generals, bollywood super stars, captain of different sports etc.

    but what the reason to offer better opportunities to minorities while they are richer than Hindus too? per capita income of Sikhs is well above average of Indian Hindus, while Christians receive foreign funds too for being Christians? while Muslims have problems of having too many kids, so their per capita income is obviously low?????????

    then here, what the reason to punish Hindus in India itself for being Hindus? why so many projects, loans/ better financial opportunities for the minorities of India, while punishing Hindus this way, for being a Hindu??????? :india: :toilet:
     
    wolfpackx1 and Tshering22 like this.
  21. Tshering22

    Tshering22 Sikkimese Saber Senior Member

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2010
    Messages:
    4,404
    Likes Received:
    2,783
    Location:
    Gangtok, Sikkim, India
    You forget to add us. We Buddhists have also started facing the heat from Secular fascists and their islamic and vaticanian overlords. Jihad's example you know very well, the attacks against Buddhists that led to riots from Myanmar all the way into temple blasts in Gaya; and from missionaries who have been bullying Buddhists into converting in Arunachal Pradesh, all in secret nod from secularist governments.
     
    wolfpackx1 and hello_10 like this.

Share This Page