Brazil's Lower House has passed Dilma impeachment

Discussion in 'Americas' started by IBSA, Apr 19, 2016.

  1. IBSA

    IBSA Regular Member

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    After Vote to Remove Brazil’s President, Key Opposition Figure Holds Meetings in Washington

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    Pro-government deputies hold a banner that reads in Portuguese “Cunha out!” behind the table of House speaker Eduardo Cunha, seated center, during a voting session on the impeachment of President Dilma Rousseff, in Brasilia, Brazil, April 17, 2016.

    BRAZIL’S LOWER HOUSE of Congress on Sunday voted to impeach the country’s president, Dilma Rousseff, sending the removal process to the Senate. In an act of unintended though rich symbolism, the House member who pushed impeachment over the 342-vote threshold was Dep. Bruno Araújo, himself implicated by a document indicating he may have received illegal funds from the construction giant at the heart of the nation’s corruption scandal. Even more significantly, Araújo belongs to the center-right party PSDB, whose nominees have lost four straight national elections to Rousseff’s moderate-left PT party, with the last ballot-box defeat delivered just 18 months ago, when 54 million Brazilians voted to re-elect Dilma as president.

    Those two facts about Araújo underscore the unprecedentedly surreal nature of yesterday’s proceedings in Brasília, capital of the world’s fifth-largest country. Politicians and parties that have spent two decades trying, and failing, to defeat PT in democratic elections triumphantly marched forward to effectively overturn the 2014 vote by removing Dilma on grounds that, as today’s New York Times report makes clear, are, at best, dubious in the extreme. Even The Economist, which has long despised the PT and its anti-poverty programs and wants Dilma to resign, has argued that “in the absence of proof of criminality, impeachment is unwarranted” and “looks like a pretext for ousting an unpopular president.”

    Sunday’s proceedings, conducted in the name of combating corruption, were presided over by one of the democratic world’s most blatantly corrupt politicians, House speaker Eduardo Cunha (above, center), who wasrecently discovered to have stashed millions of dollars in secret Swiss bank accounts that have no possible non-corrupt source and who lied under oath when he denied to Congressional investigators that he had foreign bank accounts. Of the 594 members of the House, as the Globe and Mail reported yesterday, “318 are under investigation or face charges” while their target, President Rousseff, “herself faces no allegation of financial impropriety.”

    One by one, corruption-stained legislators marched to the microphone to address Cunha, voting “yes” on impeachment by professing to be horrified by corruption. As preambles to their votes, they cited a dizzying array of bizarre motives, from “the fundamentals of Christianity” and “not to be as red as Venezuela and North Korea” to “the evangelical nation” and “the peace of Jerusalem.” The Guardian’s Jonathan Watts captured just some of the farce:

    Yes, voted Paulo Maluf, who is on Interpol’s red list for conspiracy. Yes, voted Nilton Capixaba, who is accused of money laundering. “For the love of God, yes!” declared Silas Camara, who is under investigation for forging documents and misappropriating public funds.

    It is highly likely that the Senate will agree to hear the charges, which will result in the 180-day suspension of Dilma as president and the installation of the pro-business Vice President Michel Temer from the PMDB party. The vice president himself is, as the New York Times put it, “under scrutiny over claims that he was involved in an illegal ethanol purchasing scheme.” Temer recently made it known that one of the leading candidates to head his economic team would be the chairman of Goldman Sachs in Brazil, Paulo Leme.

    If, after trial, two-thirds of the Senate votes to convict, Dilma will be permanently removed. Many suspect that one core objective in impeaching Dilma is to provide a cathartic sense for the public that corruption has been addressed, all designed to exploit Temer’s newfound control to prevent further investigations of the dozens upon dozens of actually corrupt politicians populating the leading parties.



    THE U.S. HAS been notably quiet about this tumult in the second-largest country in the hemisphere, and its posture has barely been discussed in the mainstream press. It’s not hard to see why. The U.S. spent years vehemently denying that it had any role in the 1964 military coup that removed Brazil’s elected left-wing government, a coup that resulted in 20 years of a brutal, pro-U.S., right-wing military dictatorship. But secret documents and recordings emerged proving that the U.S. actively helped plot that coup, and the country’s 2014 Truth Commission reportdocumented that the U.S. and U.K. aggressively supported the dictatorship and even “trained Brazilian interrogators in torture techniques.”



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    Jair Bolsonaro, a right-wing, pro-impeachment Brazilian politician who is expected to run for president.
    Photo: Fernando Bizerra/EPA/Newscom


    That U.S-supported coup and military dictatorship loom large over the current controversy. President Rousseff and her supporters explicitly call the attempt to remove her a coup. One prominent pro-impeachment deputado who is expected to run for president, the right-wing Jair Bolsonaro (whom The Intercept profiled last year), yesterday explicitly praised the military dictatorship and pointedly hailed Col. Carlos Alberto Brilhante Ustra, the dictatorship’s chief torturer (notably responsible for Dilma’s torture). Bolsonaro’s son, Eduardo, also in the House, said he was casting his impeachment vote “for the military men of ’64″: those who carried out the coup and imposed military rule.


    The endless invocation of God and Family by impeachment proponents yesterday was redolent of the motto of the 1964 coup: “March of the Family with God for Liberty.” Just as Brazil’s leading oligarch-owned media outletssupported the 1964 coup as a necessary strike against left-wing corruption, so too have they been unified in supporting, and inciting, the contemporary impeachment movement against PT with the same rationale.

    Dilma’s relationship with the U.S. was strained for years, significantly exacerbated by her vocal denunciations of NSA spying that targeted Brazilian industry, its population, and the president personally, as well as Brazil’s close trade relationship with China. Her predecessor, Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva, had also alienated many U.S. officials by, among other things, joining with Turkey to negotiate an independent deal with Iran over its nuclear program when Washington was attempting to assemble global pressure against Tehran. Washington insiders have been making it increasingly clear that they no longer view Brazil as safe for capital.

    The U.S., of course, has a long — and recent — history of engineering instability and coups against democratically elected, left-wing Latin American governments it dislikes. Beyond the 1964 coup in Brazil, the U.S. was at least supportive of the attempted 2002 overthrow of Venezuelan President Hugo Chávez, played a central role in the 2004 ouster of Haitian President Jean-Bertrand Aristide, and then-Secretary of State Hillary Clinton lent vital support to legitimize the 2009 coup in Honduras, just to name a few examples. Many on the Brazilian left believe that the U.S. is actively engineering the current instability in their country in order to get rid of a left-wing party that has relied heavily on trade with China, and instead usher in a more pro-business, pro-U.S. government that could never win an election on its own.



    ALTHOUGH NO REAL evidence has emerged proving this theory, a little-publicized trip to the U.S. this week by a key Brazilian opposition leader will likely fuel those concerns. Today — the day after the impeachment vote — Sen. Aloysio Nunes of the PSDB will be in Washington to undertake three days of meetings with various U.S. officials as well as with lobbyists and assorted influence-peddlers close to Clinton and other leading political figures.

    Sen. Nunes is meeting with the chairman and ranking member of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, Bob Corker, R-Tenn., and Ben Cardin, D-Md.; Undersecretary of State and former Ambassador to Brazil Thomas Shannon; and attending a luncheon on Tuesday hosted by the Washington lobbying firm Albright Stonebridge Group, headed by former Clinton Secretary of State Madeleine Albright and former Bush 43 Commerce Secretary and Kellogg Company CEO Carlos Gutierrez.

    The Brazilian Embassy in Washington and Sen. Nunes’s office told The Intercept that they had no additional information about the Tuesday luncheon. In an email, the Albright Stonebridge Group wrote that there is “no media component” to the event, which is for the “Washington policy and business community,” and a list of attendees or topics addressed would not be made public.



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    Sen. Aloysio Nunes (left) with House speaker Eduardo Cunha (right) and Sen. José Serra.
    Photo: Marcos Alves/Agencia O Globo/AP


    Nunes is an extremely important — and revealing — opposition figure to send to the U.S. for these high-level meetings. He ran for vice president in 2014 on the PSDB ticket that lost to Dilma. He will, notably, now be one of the key opposition figures leading the fight to impeach Dilma in the Senate.


    As president of the Brazilian Senate’s Foreign Relations Committee, Nunes has repeatedly advocated that Brazil once again move closer to an alliance with the U.S. and U.K. And — it almost goes without saying — Nunes has been heavily implicated in corruption allegations; in September, a judge ordered a criminal investigation after an informant, a construction company executive, told investigators that he gave Sen. Nunes R$ 500,000 (US$ 140,000) for his campaign — R$ 300,000 above board and another R$ 200,000 in illicit bribes — in order to win contracts with Petrobras. It is hardly the first such accusation against him.

    Nunes’s Washington trip was reportedly ordered by Temer himself, who isalready acting as though he runs Brazil. Temer is furious by what he perceives to be a radical, highly unfavorable change in the international narrative, which has increasingly depicted impeachment as a lawless and anti-democratic attempt by the opposition, led by Temer himself, to gain unearned power.

    The would-be president ordered Nunes to Washington, reported Folha, to launch “a counteroffensive in public relations” to combat this growing anti-impeachment sentiment around the world, which Temer said is “demoralizing Brazilian institutions.” Demonstrating concern about growing perceptions of the Brazilian opposition’s attempted removal of Dilma, Nunes said that, in Washington, “we are going to explain that we’re not a banana republic.” A representative for Temer said this perception “is contaminating Brazil’s image on the international stage.”

    “This is a public relations trip,” says Maurício Santoro, a professor of political science at the State University of Rio de Janeiro, in an interview with The Intercept. “The most important challenge that Aloysio faces is not the American government, it is American public opinion. That is where the opposition is losing the battle.”

    There is no doubt that international opinion has turned against the impeachment movement of Brazil’s opposition parties. Whereas only a month ago Western media outlets depicted anti-government street protests in glowing terms, they now routinely highlight the fact that the legal grounds for impeachment are dubious at best and that impeachment leaders are far more implicated in corruption than Dilma.

    In particular, Temer was reportedly concerned about, and furious over, thedenunciation of impeachment by the U.S.-supported Organization of American States, whose secretary-general, Luis Almagro, said the group was “concerned over the process against Dilma, who hasn’t been accused of anything” and because “among those pushing impeachment are members of Congress accused and guilty of corruption.” The head of the Union of South American Nations, Ernesto Samper, similarly said that impeachment “is a serious reason to be concerned for the security of Brazil and the region.”

    The trip to Washington by this leading corruption-implicated opposition figure, the day after the House votes to impeach Dilma, will, at the very least, raise questions about the U.S. posture toward removal of the president. It will almost certainly fuel concerns on the Brazilian left about the U.S. role in the instability in their country. And it highlights many of the undiscussed dynamics driving impeachment, including a desire to move Brazil closer to the U.S. and to make it more accommodating to global business interests and austerity measures at the expense of the political agenda that Brazilian voters have embraced in four straight national elections.



    UPDATE: Prior to publication, Sen. Nunes’ office advised The Intercept that they had no additional information about his trip beyond what was written in their April 15 press release. Subsequent to publication, Sen. Nunes’ office pointed us to his April 17 letter to the editor of Folha, claiming that — contrary to their reporting — Vice President Michel Temer’s call was not the reason for his trip to Washington.

    https://theintercept.com/2016/04/18...position-figure-holds-meetings-in-washington/
     
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  3. IBSA

    IBSA Regular Member

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    Why vote to impeach Dilma Rousseff?
    Hardly any of the federal deputies in favour of impeachment gave the stated charges as their reason

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    ON SUNDAY April 17th the lower house of Brazil’s congress held a special session to vote on whether the president, Dilma Rousseff, should be put through an impeachment trial. The charge is that her government had fiddled government accounts, concealing their parlous state. But hardly any of the federal deputies who spoke in the raucous, viciously partisan televised special session even mentioned this. Instead, as opponents of impeachment assailed them as liars, thieves, bigots and coup-mongers, they cited a more eclectic bunch of reasons for their votes. Here is a small selection, translated by The Economist, from a list collated by Cecília Olliveira, an observer of Brazilian politics:

    • For the birthday of my granddaughter
    • For the foundations of Christianity
    • For Bruno and Felipe
    • For the Masons of Brazil
    • For rural producers, because if they don’t plant there will be neither lunch nor dinner
    • Because of the proposal that children can have sex-change procedures [while still] in school
    • To end the profitability of being unemployed or a layabout
    • For the congregation of the “Quadrangular” [an evangelical church]
    • For the aged and children
    • For an end to welfare dependency
    • For my mother Lucimar
    • For charismatic renewal
    • For Brazilian doctors
    • To put an end to CUT [the biggest Brazilian grouping of trade unions] and its no-good types
    • For the love of this country
    • For an end to the Petrobras scandal and those who profited from it
    • For the Republic of Curitiba [a Brazilian state capital; Sérgio Moro, the crusading judge leading the investigation into corruption at the state-controlled oil giant, Petrobras, hails from there]
    • In memory of my father
    • For Campo Grande [the state capital of Mato Grosso do Sul], the loveliest brunette of Brazil
    • For gun control
    • Because of the communism that threatens this country
    • For the fearless and pioneering people of the state of Rondônia
    • For BR 429 [an interstate highway]
    • For all the insurance brokers
    • For my unborn daughter Manoela
    • For my 93-year-old mother who is at home
    • In homage to my city’s founding day
    • For peace in Jerusalem
    • For the best state, Tocantins
    • For my mother, who at the moment is fighting for her life
    • For the sector that generates wealth: agribusiness
    • For my son Breno and my beloved military police of São Paulo
    • For the military of 1964 [who took control of Brazil in a coup]
    • So that we don’t become Reds like in Venezuela and North Korea
    • For my 78-year-old father who taught me the principles of the word of God
    • For Sandra, for Erica, for Vítor, for Jorge, and for my grandson who is on the way
    • For my state of São Paulo, governed for the past 20 years by honest politicians from my party
    • For my wife and my daughter, who are my principal electorate
    • As tribute to my only and true riches, my daughters
    • For an end to the “colonels” [the big landowners and rich families who effectively rule much of north and north-east Brazil]
    • For the armed forces who are now pensioners without a salary
    • In tribute to my father Roberto Jefferson [a Brazilian politician implicated in a massive political scandal in 2005]
    • For Carlos Alberto Brilhante Ustra, the Terror of Dilma [Colonel Brilhante Ustra was the chief torturer under the military dictatorship]
    • For street-dwellers who sleep on the street, are born on the street and die on the street
    • In order that no government stands against the nation of Israel
    • For science and technology
    • For my wife Mariana and daughter little Mariana
    • Against the Bolivarian dictatorship
    • For the truckers
    • For free men and morality
    • For the honour of the people of Minas Gerais [a Brazilian state]
    • For Canção Nova [a Catholic radio and television network]; for the Brazilians who live with drugs
    • For my aunt Eurides, who looked after me when I was small
    • For you, mum
    • For the libertarian traditions of Minas Gerais
    • I forgot to mention my son. For you, Paulo Henrique! Kiss!
    • For the cancer hospital
    • In tribute to the victims of BR 251 [an interstate highway]
    • To honour the flag of Minas Gerais
    • I am a leader of the majority; I am not a leader of the minority
    Read The Economist's analysis of the vote here

    http://www.economist.com/news/ameri...-favour-impeachment-gave-stated-charges-their
     
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  4. IBSA

    IBSA Regular Member

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    I'm shameful of Brazilian deputies. :doh: :mad2: :frusty:
     
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  5. IBSA

    IBSA Regular Member

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    A good analysis of Brazil's political crisis

     
  6. Razor

    Razor CIDs from Tamilnadu Senior Member

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    Wow.

    So In the last 10 or so years UKR, SYR and BRA.
    They did try one in Hong Kong (Umbrella Rev). Looks like it failed.

    Got to admit though, America is getting better at the art of coup making.

    But at least hopefully the brazilian one will not be as violent as SYR.
     
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  7. IBSA

    IBSA Regular Member

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    Football's fan behavior are extending to politics between Brazilian citizens. People are thinking politics less rationally, try to find what is the best by the dialogue, and each more becoming emotional, fueled by passion like a football fan and his team. This provokes blindness, and feeds the hate between those in favor and against the gov.
     
  8. Navnit Kundu

    Navnit Kundu Pika Hu Akbarrr!! Senior Member

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    This behavior is not purely autonomous. This is being fueled by CIA backed media channels. I checked out some of your local English media news and I didn't even have to dig deeper, the headlines itself tell a story of who is pulling the strings behind the scenes. She is accused of a lesser crime, I believe all politicians in all countries run win elections on corruption money, one can't be elected to any meaningful position unless you take some unholy cash form industrialists in that region. It's a bit amusing that the media is hell bent on making her look like an out-of-the-world alien indulging in an unprecedented crime of corruption for the first time ever on this pious planet Earth.

    Judge your national leaders for their policies towards the nation, if they have a net-positive effect on the nation's economy and security, hail them, if it hurt the nation then prosecute them. Don't let outsiders tell you that your national leaders are no good because they have a few Lamborghinis and villas bought through unaccounted wealth. If undisputed personal pity were the prerequisite benchmark to be met to qualify as an elected member in public life, then the US Congress hall would be empty. The CIA is only playing on the envy of the 'have-not' masses to make the 'undeservingly rich' PM look bad. If you allowed foreign vested interests to meddle in your affairs for petty things like individual corruption then the country will never stand strong. This is CIA's attempt to weaken the BRICS bolc. Stay strong.

    Btw, the CNN bitch Amanpour you have cited as a good analysis of the Brazil crisis, do you know that she is the wife of James Rubin (Assistant Secretary of State for Public Affairs)? How credible can one expect a journalist to be when she is deeply connected to the deep state in the US?
     
    Last edited: Apr 21, 2016
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  9. IBSA

    IBSA Regular Member

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    One wall has to be installed ahead of House of Representatives to separate those who are in favor and against gov in the day of the session which the deputies have voted by impeachment. So this wall was called by people as the Impeachment's Wall, or a Brazilian version of Berlin's Wall, since it separated leftists East Germans from liberal West Germans. While in rest of world countries are rising walls and fences in their frontiers to protect their nations against thiefs and thugs migrants, in Brazil we are rising walls to separate we from ourselves.

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    In the right upper corner, a poster written "Shame's Wall"

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    a message that reads: 'look the point that we arrived'
     
  10. Razor

    Razor CIDs from Tamilnadu Senior Member

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    Interestingly Amanpur was also trying for US "democracy" intervention in SYR. :hmm:

    Oh did I use "Interestingly", :facepalm: I meant "Unsurprisingly"

    But seriously don't call her bitch.
    Come on now, she is probably some kind of transgender creature.

    [​IMG]
     
  11. IBSA

    IBSA Regular Member

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    Behind all these yellow-and-green dressed people are in common only the hate against Workers Party (PT). Such patriotic masses are composed of right-liberals who wants a minimum state, militarists who wants the back the military rule, monarchists who wants the back of Brazilian kingdom, right-conservatives linked to a Catholic view of world, a-political people against politics at general, and even leftists of radicals dissident parties born after PT reached up the power. So what common project they have to substitute that of PT? None! Only thing that unite them is their hate of PT. Since the pure hate dont serves as a political flag, they dresses themselves as patriots saying that 'Brazil is above PT', and demading its exit from power.
     
  12. Navnit Kundu

    Navnit Kundu Pika Hu Akbarrr!! Senior Member

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    I hope I could go to the gym, take some steroids and become at least half the man she is! boy oh boy, what a manly woman this is. Even Rani Mukherjee feels less manly in front of her.

    Btw, the interesting thing here is that these Americunts are trying to topple duly elected government in South America and yet no 'intellectual' on Brazilian media is even uttering the word Monroe Doctrine. If the US had the gall to openly declare that South America was off-limits to Eurpoeans, what makes people think that the US will allow a BRICS influenced member state to flourish in their backyard. Long story short, if the US has its way, South America will forever remain a colony of the US, controlled from behind the scenes. Turns out, even the funding for the armed communist guerrillas were sponsored graciously by Uncle Sam. In an abstract sense, even Brazil is to blame if they failed to cultivate the foundations of a nationalist narrative which makes people aware of their nation's interest and the external and internal threats that the country faces.

    @IBSA I hope your PM defeats the impeachment attempt and gets back at the Brazilian politicians and media on US payroll by unleashing the intel agencies to assassinate all of these traitors who have done a deal with the country's mortal enemy.
     
    Last edited: Apr 21, 2016
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  13. IBSA

    IBSA Regular Member

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    Jointly with this hate of PT, a arising hostility toward the red color - the PT's color- is in course. These demonstrators consider anyone wearing red clothes, either a shirt, a pant, a shoe, a bag, a hat, etc., as a communist one and are hostile toward him.

    Ferrari is red, so it is a comunnist car
    McDonald's is red, so it is a communist company
    A flower is red, then she is communist. Cuts off her.
    Lal Kila is red, then it is communist. Destroy it.

    :crazy::rofl::rofl:

    There are many meanings for a person choose to wear red clothes: love, football team color, national color, a firefighter, a blood donation campaign, etc. others than just a communist symbol.
     
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  14. Bahamut

    Bahamut Senior Member Senior Member

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    CIA need to improve their skills.Even a drunk person can give better reason.
     
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  15. IBSA

    IBSA Regular Member

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    Threats and violence: Brazil's political troubles play out online

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    Rogerio Maudonnet's son was targeted for wearing a shirt bearing the Swiss flag - classmates mistakenly thought it represented the Workers' Party


    Be careful what colour you wear in Brazil these days.

    When a 9-year-old boy from Sao Paulo wore a shirt with a Swiss flag on it to school, he was shouted at and threatened by his classmates. The red of the Swiss flag, they claimed, marked him out as a backer of the scandal-hit government of President Dilma Rousseff.

    "They called him a supporter of the Workers' Party and said he should be beaten and thrown in the streets," the boy's father, Rogerio Maudonnet, told BBC Brasil. "I was very scared to see children repeating hate speech."

    Maudonnet posted his story on Facebook. But his story is not an isolated one. As clashes mount between pro- and anti-government supporters, hundreds of Brazilians are taking to social media to speak out about episodes of harassment, verbal abuse and violence by supporters from all sides of the political spectrum.

    Many say they have become targets for the most trivial of reasons - even without overtly expressing their political preferences. Some have no strong political leanings at all. And sometimes the incidents happen in very unlikely circumstances.

    Renata Baltar, a 28-year-old historian also from Sao Paulo, said a man accosted her while she was out one evening. Baltar shared the story on her Facebook page.

    "I was with an American friend and we decided to have a snack at a local restaurant after a party. It was around 5 a.m. and the place was crowded. All of a sudden the whole restaurant started to shout anti-government chants," she recalls.

    "Then a man who was sitting beside me started to make some really derogatory, sexist comments against President Dilma Rousseff. I said to him she could be a bad president, but he had no right to offend a woman like that."

    "He turned to me furiously and called me names. He offended me with the worst possible comments, saying he would punch my face and I should be beaten," she told BBC Brasil.

    http://www.bbc.com/news/blogs-trending-35929979
     
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  16. Razor

    Razor CIDs from Tamilnadu Senior Member

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    I think the angle they are trying is "Resonate with the common man" or something.
     
  17. Razor

    Razor CIDs from Tamilnadu Senior Member

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    When did Brazilians go crazy?

    I thought they were chill.
     
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  18. IBSA

    IBSA Regular Member

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    Brazilian became crazies since the economical scenario went bad

    During the Lula's years, PT also was in power. Lula and his colleagues were already stealing through the 'Mensalao scandal', but as the economy was running good, so, apparently, PT didn't mess up nobody. High and middle class could consume, travel, and be happy that they dont pay the least bit of attention to the PT. But now, with the expensive dollar exchange rate, the elites' weekend in Miami ended, and PT received the guilt of everythings.
     
  19. IBSA

    IBSA Regular Member

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    There are running here some rumors that China could approve sanctions against Brazil in case of President Dilma's impeachment.

    chinese IDF members, what are being the coverage of chinese media about the Brazilian political crisis? do your gov already revealed his position about the impeachment process?
     
  20. DingDong

    DingDong Senior Member Senior Member

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    This is the problem with the Presidential System. Parliamentary System is naturally chaotic and there exists no single authority to target.

    What are Brazil's "key opposition figures" doing in Washington? Could not find a good location within Brazil to hold their meetings? @IBSA Are the common Brazilians so dumb that they allow this circus?
     
  21. IBSA

    IBSA Regular Member

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    Yes, common Brazilians are so ignorant politically that they believe in what media says, and many support the impeachment. In the penultimate sunday, the day of impeachment voting, many brazilians launched fireworks after the Lower House session has approved the impeachment.
     

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