Bhutan seeks China's help for a seat at UN high table

Discussion in 'China' started by huaxia rox, Aug 14, 2012.

  1. huaxia rox

    huaxia rox Senior Member Senior Member

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    Bhutan seeks China's help for a seat at UN high table - Times Of India


    BEIJING: Bhutan has sought China's support for a non-permanent seat in the UN Security Council for the term 2013-14. This was revealed by the Bhutanese government after its leaders held border talks with a visiting Chinese delegation in Thimphu on Friday.

    "The talks were held in a warm and friendly atmosphere," the Bhutanese foreign ministry said in a statement. "It will provide the opportunity for the two nations to better understand each other's positions, which will facilitate an early and just settlement of the boundary issues."

    The meeting discussed Bhutan's aspiration to serve as a non-permanent member of UNSC, elections for which are scheduled for October this year, said Bhutan's leading English daily, Kuensel.

    An eight-member Chinese delegation led by vice foreign minister Fu Ying participated in the border talks just six weeks after the two countries established diplomatic ties for the first time. China is expected to bargain hard before helping Bhutan achieve its international ambitions in the form of a non-permanent seat at UNSC. Beijing might ask Thimphu to reduce its dependence on India, and discourage any future visit by the Dalai Lama to the country.
     
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  3. huaxia rox

    huaxia rox Senior Member Senior Member

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    China-Bhutan Relations: Implications For Indian Security – Analysis

    China-Bhutan Relations: Implications For Indian Security - Analysis Eurasia Review


    In a historic congregation Chinese Premier Wen Jiabao and his Bhutanese counterpart Mr. Jigmi Y. Thinley held their first meeting on the sidelines of United Nation Rio+20 Conference on Sustainable Development in Brazil. The meeting has raised few questions as to why is China interested in Bhutan, especially now despite the long impending boundary dispute. Why has there been a strategic shift in Bhutan’s foreign policy? What are the overall implications of this development on Indian security?

    Sino-Bhutan Relations

    Bhutan forms one of the fingers of China’s five finger policy. China considers Tibet as the ‘palm consisting of five fingers policy’ namely, Ladakh, Nepal, Sikkim, Bhutan and Arunachal Pradesh. This exemplifies the importance of Bhutan in Chinese foreign policy. China has always been keen on maintaining good relations with its Asian neighbors – ‘periphery countries’ (zhoubian goujia). The peripheral policy forms the core of China’s external strategy. Relations with these countries help to avoid external instabilities that may cause any internal frictions. China needs a peaceful and stable periphery for its ‘Peaceful Development/Rise’.


    Bhutan forms one of the fingers of China’s five finger policy. China considers Tibet as the ‘palm consisting of five fingers policy’ namely, Ladakh, Nepal, Sikkim, Bhutan and Arunachal Pradesh. This exemplifies the importance of Bhutan in Chinese foreign policy. China has always been keen on maintaining good relations with its Asian neighbors – ‘periphery countries’ (zhoubian goujia). The peripheral policy forms the core of China’s external strategy. Relations with these countries help to avoid external instabilities that may cause any internal frictions. China needs a peaceful and stable periphery for its ‘Peaceful Development/Rise’.

    The PRC has outlined its plan of extending the railway network from Lhasa to Zangmu on the Nepal border. According to this blueprint, yet another line will branch out midway from the line at Shigatse. This line will move east and go up to Yadong, at the mouth of Chumbi Valley- strategically located at the tri –junction of India-China-Bhutan.

    Bhutan has been a strong ally of India and has refrained from establishing relations with China. It was concerned over the takeover of Tibet in 1950 and was anxious that its sovereignty would be compromised because of Chinese claims to Bhutan as part of a greater Tibet. This had led to the closure of the Tibetan-Bhutanese border in the north.

    Boundary Dispute and its implications on Indian Security

    Bhutan is the only country in South Asia which does not have diplomatic relations with China. Bilateral relations have remained strained because of the dispute over their 470km border. It has four disputed areas that stretch from Dhoklam in the west, Charithang, Sinchulimpa and Dramana pasture land. China is claiming maximum territory in the western sector that is close to the tri-junction of Bhutan, China and India for strategic purposes. It has offered Thimphu a deal: it wants Bhutan’s northwestern areas in exchange for recognizing Bhutan’s control over the central areas. In 2004, the Bhutanese National Assembly discussed the issue of sector exchange. Bhutan did not make India party to these deliberations. This has raised ambiguity in India vis-a-vis this sector. (Chinese border settlement with Nepal was through a package deal rather than through sector-by- sector settlement.) The PRC wants Bhutan to compromise on the Chumbi valley.

    Any development in the tri-junction is a matter of concern for India. The region is close to India’s ‘chicken’s–neck: the Siliguri corridor which links the north-east passage. The move has alarmed New Delhi because it will bring the Chinese forces within a few kilometres of the Siliguri Corridor which connects the rest of India with the Northeast and Nepal with Bhutan. Chumbi Valley is of equal strategic significance to China because of its shared border with Tibet and Sikkim. Any development in the Chumbi valley that alters the status quo in Beijing’s favour will have serious bearings on India. Until now, 19 rounds of boundary talks between China and Bhutan have failed to solve the dispute because of its close ties with India.

    Bhutan has largely toiled under the influence of India. India-Bhutan relations were revised in 2007 and now it is more of an equal relation. This was followed by Bhutan’s turn to parliamentary democracy. As democracy started taking ground, special ties with India have been questioned. Thus to neutralize its relationship, Bhutan has started turning towards China. There is a section in Bhutan that is thinking of opening similar points for China to maintain equilibrium vis-a-vis India. Perhaps, Bhutan is trying to come out of India’s shadow and seeks to play a more dynamic role internationally.

    Having been an agriculture and forestry based economy; Bhutan has recently opened up its economy. Chinese companies have been given contract to construct the world’s tallest Buddha Statue in Thimphu. Beijing is exporting farming and telecommunication equipment and has also offered to invest in projects related to health and education services. Unquestionably, China is an attractive source of investment. However, Chinese investment in any country comes with its own terms and conditions – they bring in their own workers and equipment. As a result, the benefits of development are not enjoyed by the local communities. However, this is not the case with Indian investment.

    Until now, Bhutan has never played its China card. Today, the security of Bhutan is vulnerable. Japan has announced that it will open its own diplomatic mission in Thimpu by 2014. Bhutan is no more a protectorate of India and is steadily moving towards China. Thus any policy towards Bhutan, therefore, will have to be carefully calibrated.
     
  4. drkrn

    drkrn Senior Member Senior Member

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    Bhutan external affairs are done by ministry of external affairs India.
    i doubt that they approached china for getting a non-permanent seat in UN security counsel.

    what are the benefits Bhutan would get by getting into security counsel??
     
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  5. nimo_cn

    nimo_cn Senior Member Senior Member

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    Consider getting rid of India to be one of the benefits.
     
  6. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    Point!

    However, they have done it one better.

    They have no diplomatic relations with China!

    And are making China jump the hoops!
     
  7. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    If one observes the map, the Chumbi Valley is a chicken's neck which can be squeezed by India, before any dagger is thrust by China. ;)
     
  8. amitkriit

    amitkriit Senior Member Senior Member

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    Chinese Propaganda at it's best. Bhutan is one of the closest allies of India.
     
  9. drkrn

    drkrn Senior Member Senior Member

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    getting rid of India a benefit to Bhutan...
    oh my god you surely need some medical advice.what they are going to do aligning with china, nothing but merging with main territory, making it a Han majority, loosing all cultural social identity.

    considering Bhutan past they even expelled Nepalese from Bhutan because they are increasing in no, they can never allow Chinese to enter there.

    by the way their economy is very a much mixed with Indian, societies too,way too far bond to be broken easily
     
  10. agentperry

    agentperry Senior Member Senior Member

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    in the whole of the intelligentsia world community people are seeing it Indian step to make communication channels with china and only here some part time commentators are seeing it as threat to indian security. bhutna do not do anything without consulting india ( i said do not and not will not). and this thing is again after indian green signal and probably indian proposal.
     
  11. huaxia rox

    huaxia rox Senior Member Senior Member

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    1 sikkim is a good example for bhutan.....i assume bhutanese dont like getting anexed so while they have to maintain certain relation with india they wanna seek others to help develop their economy etc......

    2 if prc were not a p5 nation then bhutan would not bother talking to chinese.....

    3 boder issue is just 1 thing for prc and bhutan....for a country that is not very powerful like bhutan to build healthy relation with its neighboring countries is for its best interest.....why just stick to india???? there r a lot of countries on earth......
     
  12. Illusive

    Illusive Senior Member Senior Member

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    Tibet is also a very good example for them, and what makes you think Bhutan is a weak country, India protects Bhutan, any attack on Bhutan is considered an attack on India.

    I think this should pretty much sum up the relationship between India and Bhutan.
    Bhutan–India relations - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

     
  13. huaxia rox

    huaxia rox Senior Member Senior Member

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    no country needs others to protect.....no one needs others to control its external affairs.....every country should do things according to their own interest.....
     
  14. Illusive

    Illusive Senior Member Senior Member

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    Did you forget North Korea or did they say that to you..
     
  15. amitkriit

    amitkriit Senior Member Senior Member

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    At least Indian culture and politics doesn't promote dictatorship. Bhutan has been gradually democratized under Indian influence, and people are happy. Bhutan needs India's protection against China.
     
  16. huaxia rox

    huaxia rox Senior Member Senior Member

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    north korea doesnt need others to protect....its external affairs r controlled by themselves.....so what about north korea???
     
  17. huaxia rox

    huaxia rox Senior Member Senior Member

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    u used to say that to sikkimese as well i reckon.....we all know the consequence......
     
  18. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    Given Chinese history of imperialism and hegemonic expansionism, Bhutan would surely look to others than China for its safety and ensuring its territorial integrity and sovereignty.l

    Bhutan has association with Tibet and given the propensity of the Chinese to invent history and using far fetched theories to gobble up its small or defenceless neighbours, Bhutan has sure got good reasons to worry about China and its territorial ambitions.

    Her asking China to push her case in the UN is merely pragmatism.

    It is similar to China asking India to assist its claim in the UN.

    In the early 1950s, India attempted, like the Soviet Union, unsuccessfully to help the People's Republic of China join the UN but was rebuffed by Western powers.

    It maybe noted that:

     
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  19. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    We all know the consequences of Chinese imperialism as was meted out to the Baiyues and others, as also of Tibet!
     
  20. amitkriit

    amitkriit Senior Member Senior Member

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    We did not annex Sikkim with force they voted in favour of joining the Indian Union to enjoy the freedom and liberty all Indians enjoy in a free, liberal country. Alas, you won't ever be able to know what "Freedom" really means. How many Sikkimese people are burning themselves up on streets like the people in Chinese Occupied Tibet?

    Bhutanese people have historical relation with India, this relation is too strong to be broken, we are like an extended family.
     
  21. Illusive

    Illusive Senior Member Senior Member

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