Bhopal Gas tragedy- Rs. 1320 Cr. package recommended

Discussion in 'Politics & Society' started by satyam, Jun 7, 2010.

  1. satyam

    satyam New Member

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  3. tarunraju

    tarunraju Moderator Moderator

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    Yup, and at this time Congress wants to pass a bill in which an American nuclear power company will not be held liable if there's a disaster similar to Chernobyl, or Bhopal.
     
  4. satyam

    satyam New Member

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    And what happened to 470 million $ fine paid to the govt.? Did it reach people ?
     
  5. tarunraju

    tarunraju Moderator Moderator

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    I would be surprised if 470 Rupees reached the people. Instead the government made 25,000 Rupees per head granting bail to each of the convicted today.
     
  6. satyam

    satyam New Member

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    Heard that people were convicted of diluted charges . And Govt. pressurised CBI to slow down the case.
     
  7. Pintu

    Pintu New Member

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    http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/...ay-in-Bhopal-gas-case/articleshow/6021637.cms

    Anderson: The man who got away in Bhopal gas case
    Chidanand Rajgahtta, TNN, Jun 8, 2010, 01.39am IST

    Long before British Petroleum, there was Union Carbide; long before David Headley aka Daood Gilani, there was Warren Anderson.

    As legal proceedings in the Bhopal gas tragedy meanders on, its torturous path over 26 years a travesty of justice to many, two principals associated with the disaster have faded from sight even as newer culprits in most recent outrages (BP oil spill and Mumbai's 26/11 massacre) are in the spotlight.

    Union Carbide, the American chemical company that became notorious for the world's worst industrial disaster, is now a wholly owned subsidiary of the Dow Chemical Company. And Warren Anderson, Union Carbide CEO, at the time of the disaster and until his retirement in 1986, declared an absconder and a fugitive from justice by an Indian court, lives in relative anonymity and seclusion in Long Island, New York.

    Both have washed their hands off the Bhopal disaster. Union Carbide says its officials were not part of this case since the charges were divided long ago into a separate case. "Furthermore, Union Carbide and its officials are not subject to the jurisdiction of the Indian court since they did not have any involvement in the operation of the plant, which was owned and operated by Union Carbide India Ltd, (UCIL)" a spokesman for the company told Wall Street Journal.

    The company maintains that the Bhopal plant was designed, owned, operated and managed on a day-to-day basis by UCIL and its employees and all those convicted are the "appropriate people from UCIL — officers and those who actually ran the plant on a daily basis have appeared to face charges."

    "I want you to know that Union Carbide continues to have the utmost respect and sympathy for the victims of the tragedy and their families. Union Carbide did all it could to help the victims and their families from Day 1 right up through the settlement with the Indian government," the spokesman added.

    Anderson isn't talking. He hasn't spoken on record on the subject for nearly two decades. Now nearing 90, he lives with his wife Lillian in a million-dollar home in the swish Long Island neighbourhood of Bridgehampton, avoiding social contact and hiding from the media and activists who have struggled long to bring him to justice.

    When Casey Harrell, a Greenpeace activist, visited his home in 2002 to serve him a warrant, he refused to identify himself and pretended to be someone else.

    A neighbour also tried to throw Harrell off-track saying he was someone else and blurting out that he had nothing to do with the Bhopal disaster (even though Harrell hadn't mentioned anything about the disaster).
     
  8. ajtr

    ajtr Veteran Member Veteran Member

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  9. ajtr

    ajtr Veteran Member Veteran Member

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    Bhopal Gas Tragedy: Company Raj is back in India

    I am outraged. I am seething with anger. Nearly 26 years after the Bhopal Gas Tragedy, the night yesterday again seemed to be without end. I tossed around in my bed, trying to count the sheep a number of times, but somehow the callousness of the insensitive judiciary and the politicians remained transfixed in my wandering thoughts.

    I woke up early, and the first picture that came to my mind was from the Bollywood film Mangal Pandey. The film is based on the man who is believed to have triggered the launch of India's first battle for Independence in 1857. I could see Mangal Pandey seething with anger and clutching to his gun while the British flag lay on the ground burning. That was Circa 1857.

    In 2010, Company Raj is back in India.

    Call it 'Justice Buried' or 'Justice Denied' and as some newspapers say: After 25 Years, Another Tragedy Strikes Bhopal'. You can go on showering choicest abuses for the judiciary, especially the Supreme Court, for watering down the provisions of Indian law usually applied to road mishaps so that the Company Bahudur (as the East India Company was then known) could escape unscathed, the fact of the matter is that the Indian democracy has over the years been reduced to "of the industry, by the industry and for the industry."

    You and me do not matter any more. We have been reduced to simple numbers, to be recounted after every ten years during census.

    With 15,274 dead, 5,74,000 affected, and a verdict that should have been delivered in 26 days taking 26 long years, and that too a mockery of justice, no heads have rolled. While the newspapers are splashed with reports of the Bhopal verdict, I find Prime Minister Manmohan Singh quoted in a separate report from Srinagar, which he visited yesterday, also published on the front pages. Isn't it amusing to read the PM saying: 'Will Safeguard human rights in Kashmir.'

    You couldn't even safeguard the rights of the Bhopal victims, Mr Prime Minister.


    I don't understand how come the Prime Minister does not feel morally compelled to submit resignation over the injustice delivered in the world's worst industrial disaster. He will not. Because he is busy laying out a red carpet for Corporate America. He has an 'incomplete task' on hand. How can he apologise when he is busy fine tuning the Nuclear Liability Bill, to be introduced in the next session of Parliament, for which he may receive an honorary doctorate from the Harvard.

    Last time, he was conferred with an honorary doctorate from the Oxford, Manmohan Singh had showered praise on the British for what they did during the days of the Raj !

    You may have forgotten something that still remains embedded in me. When the Securities Scam burst in India, and I am talking of the period when Manmohan Singh was the Finance Minister, it was not only stock broker Harshad Mehta who was involved. Two foreign banks, including Citibank, were also involved. I still remember vividly when Manmohan Singh refused to initiate any action against the erring banks, saying: "It will send out a wrong signal."

    Didn't I say Company Raj is back.

    Seeking extradition of Warren Anderson, Union Carbide CEO at the time of disaster and until his retirement in 1986, was never pursued vigorously because it would send a wrong signal. And yes, Manmohan Singh did send a 'right signal' when he said that "India loves George Bush".

    At times of e-governance, I am surprised how could such gross injustice happen. Where are those who swear in the name of e-governance as the ultimate weapon to bring justice and administrative accountability? They have been busy selling computer hardware.

    Nevertheless, I must return to my work now. I and my colleagues still have to fight the battle on several fronts. Successive governments have laid the foundation for many more Bhopals -- GM crops, FDI in agriculture, Special Economic Zones (SEZ), nuclear plants, to name a few -- and are busy amending laws to make it easier for business and industry to exploit India. With Parliament in the hands of the corporates, and with democracy not looking beyond industry, it is time people realised that Company Raj is back.

    But the way a handful in Bhopal continued with the struggle for justice for 26 years, and have still not given up, I too feel inspired.

    Mangal Pandey is not dead.
     
    AkhandBharat likes this.
  10. Oracle

    Oracle New Member

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    US Congressman demands Anderson’s extradition to India

    New Delhi: The demand for extradition of former Union Carbine CEO Warren Anderson to India to stand trial in the Bhopal gas tragedy is mounting within United States even though the US government had refused to hold Anderson accountable in the case.

    US Congressman and founder of Caucus on India & Indian Americans, Frank Pallone, Jr, Wednesday criticized the Bhopal gas tragedy verdict, in which an Indian court sentenced seven people to two years in jail for a disaster that claimed over 20,000 lives and affected thousands others in 1984.

    “A sentence of merely two years for those responsible for the world's worst chemical disaster is outrageous. All those responsible for this disaster, including Warren Anderson former chairman of Union Carbide, should stand trial in India and receive punishment that reflects the devastation and pain they have caused for of thousands of people,” Pallone, Jr, was quoted as stating in reports from the US.

    “Warren Anderson absolutely deserves to be extradited from the US and punished for the full extent of his crimes,” he added.

    On Monday, US Assistant Secretary of State Robert Blake had said in Washington, “I don’t expect this verdict to reopen any new inquiries or anything like that. On the contrary, we hope that this is going to help to bring closure to the victims and their families.”

    India’s Law minister Veerapa Moily had maintained that the case against Anderson was not closed and said Anderson was ‘the person who has not responded and has absconded...he can still be tried.’

    Twenty-six years after the world's worst industrial disaster, a lower court in Bhopal on Monday (June 7) convicted and sentenced for only two years seven former top officials of UCIL for the 1984 Bhopal gas leak that eventually killed about 20,000 and left an unspecified number battered with diseases and deformities.

    The verdict did not name absconding former chairman of Union Carbide Corporation, USA, Warren Anderson while all those convicted got bail after the judgement.

    A former Criminal Bureau of Investigation (CBI) officer had claimed after the verdict that the probing agency was asked by the government to ‘go soft’ on Anderson, a charge denied by other CBI officials and government sources.

    http://sify.com/news/us-congressman...ition-to-india-news-national-kgjlNvifhhf.html
     
  11. ajtr

    ajtr Veteran Member Veteran Member

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    If they are creating hurdle even in questioning Daud gilani aka david headley(check out 26/11 thread for it) do u think that usa is gonna extradite Anderson after 25 years....
     
  12. ajtr

    ajtr Veteran Member Veteran Member

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    Former CJI backs verdict in Bhopal case


    PTI | New Delhi

    Former Supreme Court Chief Justice AH Ahmadi on Tuesday rejected criticism of dilution of charge against Union Carbide executives in Bhopal gas tragedy case, saying in criminal law there was no concept of vicarious liability.

    He also lamented that there was absence of law to deal with disasters of Bhopal kind and said law can be amended to provide for adequate punishment. :-(

    Justice Ahmadi, who headed the bench in 1996 that converted the CBI charge under the stringent provisions of 304-II that provided for maximum of 10 years imprisonment to Section with two years maximum imprisonment, said it was easy for people to talk and make allegations but judges have to work under the system.

    "One has to work within the system, within the framework of law. It is easy to speak today, to swing with the tide," he said reacting to criticism that the decision given by bench had led to light punishment given by a Bhopal court in the gas case yesterday.

    "There is no concept of vicarious liability. If my driver is driving and meets with a fatal accident, I don't become liable to be prosecuted under 304-II," he said.

    Justice Ahmadi said that there was no vicarious liability concept in criminal law except that "if there is an abetment, the abettor may be joined with the principal offender. If there is a common intention situation or conspiracy situation, that is understandable. Otherwise no."
     
  13. ajtr

    ajtr Veteran Member Veteran Member

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    Case study for Chapter 13
    Union Carbide and Bhopal

    ________________________________________________________________
    On December 2nd 1984 over 40 tons of lethal chemical gas was released into the air from the Union Carbide chemical factory in Bhopal, India. The accident was caused by water entering a tank containing chemicals: the resulting reaction generated great heat and vented the poisonous gases into the atmosphere. As a result, many thousands of people in the Bhopal area were killed – estimates vary between 3,800 and 8,000 – and hundreds of thousands have suffered ill health ever since.
    Such a disaster was bound to make headlines throughout the world. Union Carbide were held accountable in the world’s press, and the company was widely criticised by environmental groups. As years went by after the disaster, the situation grew no better: Union Carbide were seen as being slow to pay compensation, slow to make reparations at the plant, and slow in implementing a clean-up operation. In particular, the US parent company was accused of not caring about the victims simply because they were Indians.
    Twenty years on, the story has not gone away. Campaigners are still seeking further compensation: an Indian court ordered Union Carbide to pay $470m in 1989 (five years after the disaster) as a full settlement of all claims arising from the disaster, and the company did so, but campaigners say that the damage has been underestimated and that the high incidence of birth defects in the region is a result of the leakage. Union Carbide argue that the birth defects are caused by close interbreeding, a feature of marriages in the area. Campaigners claim that contamination of local water supplies has come from the plant: Union Carbide say that the type of contamination could not have been caused by anything they used at the plant, and the pollution must be coming form somewhere else.
    Union Carbide’s main argument, though, is that the Bhopal plant was only owned 51% by the company (26% by the Indian Government, the rest being privately-owned shares), and the Bhopal plant was staffed and managed entirely by Indians. The US company therefore denies any legal liability whatsoever, and has the backing of the Second Circuit Court of Appeals, Manhattan, which ruled in 1987 that the case belongs in India and the US company has no liability. The Indian Government was held partly liable and was ordered to purchase health insurance for the 100,000 people who are thought to have been affected by the incident.
    The case was further complicated in 2001 when Dow Chemical bought the US Union Carbide company. Dow (not unreasonably) do not accept any responsibility whatsoever for the disaster, and are refusing to consider any further claims. Meanwhile, campaigners have persuaded the Indian criminal court to issue a warrant for the arrest of the former Union Carbide CEO, Warren Anderson, on charges of culpable homicide and assault. This arrest warrant has been issued, and moves are afoot to have Anderson extradited from the USA to stand trial in India. This is unlikely to be implemented, of course – the US justice system is unlikely to give up a US citizen without very solid evidence of direct (and personal) responsibility.
    Meanwhile, in Bhopal the survivors of the disaster wait for something to happen. The compensation amounted to less than $500 each, which may be a substantial sum of money to people who earn only $2 a day, but still won’t cover the medical bills. The ebb and flow of corporate takeovers means that Union Carbide (India) is now owned entirely by a different corporation, as is Union Carbide USA. Neither of the new owners have any interest or desire to pay compensation, and certainly do not feel liable for the disaster. And yet the campaigning still continues, presumably until the last of the survivors has died.
    Case Study Questions
    1. If Union Carbide in the USA has no connection with the Indian company, why should they do anything? At one time Union Carbide USA was a major participant in Bhopal, and presumably had a great deal of input into the design and operation of the plant. Whatever the legal situation, this could be construed as a moral obligation – especially as the Indian Government, the other owners of the plant, have been held liable and have been ordered to pay for health insurance for the victims. A further issue is the pragmatic one, which is that Union Carbide’s corporate reputation is being severely damaged by this.
    2. How do you imagine the Union Carbide salesforce will be affected by the situation? Undoubtedly some potential customers will take a moral stance and decide that they do not want to do business with a company which apparently is dodging its responsibilities. Others may take a pragmatic approach, and will avoid Union Carbide on the grounds that they appear to have demonstrated incompetence in running the business. Still other customers will regard Union Carbide’s stance as reasonable in the circumstances, and may even applaud the company’s business acumen.
    3. How might Union Carbide’s sales management be affected by the situation? As with potential customers, some salespeople may not want to work for Union Carbide, whether or not the company is at fault.
    4. What might Union Carbide do to reduce the negative publicity?
    2
    1
     
  14. ajtr

    ajtr Veteran Member Veteran Member

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    Lack of evidence held up Anderson extradition: MEA



    NEW DELHI: Stung by the criticism over allegations that it did not pursue the extradition of Bhopal gas leak accused Warren Anderson, the foreign ministry on Wednesday suggested that there may not have been enough evidence to make the US hand over Anderson to India.

    A senior foreign ministry official said the US repeatedly turned down the request for extradition for want of "evidentiary links".

    "We have repeatedly renewed the request first made in 2003 for his extradition. The US, however, has maintained that our request is not covered by the India-US extradition treaty because evidentiary links are not there," said the official, adding that the MEA wanted investigating agencies to come up with more evidence to enable the foreign ministry to put up its case more forcefully before Washington.

    The foreign ministry kept renewing the request till 2008. In fact, then Indian ambassador to US Ronen Sen wrote to the CBI chief in September 2008 saying that more information and evidence would help India expedite the process.

    The official said the government was "collectively" examining the case and the MEA didn't work in isolation. The official also denied knowledge of any letter written by the ministry to the CBI, as alleged by retired CBI officer B R Lall, asking it to go slow on Anderson's extradition. "We are examining our records but we have not come across any such letter. Since we were collectively looking at collating evidence, how could MEA have written such a letter," the official asked.

    "We will proceed on the basis of the collective decision of the government now. The government of India will take a decision how to move forward, legal authorities will be consulted. Government of India will take a decision and we will proceed accordingly," the official said when asked if the MEA will renew its request once again.

    Asked if there was a need to review the whole bilateral extradition treaty with the US, the official said, "I don't think that is germane to the discussion at present." The official also asserted that "whatever has been done, has been done on the basis of due diligence and consultations".
     
  15. AkhandBharat

    AkhandBharat Regular Member

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    CPM, BJP turn up heat on N-liability Bill

    Even as the UPA government indicated its flexibility on the Civil Nuclear Liability Bill issue, the CPM and the BJP on Wednesday made it clear that they were not willing to tone down their objections to the legislation.

    While the BJP asked the government to withdraw the legislation, the CPM stuck to its stand that the suppliers’ liability needed to be fixed. CPM general secretary Prakash Karat told The Indian Express that unless foreign suppliers are brought within the ambit of liability, the CPM and the Left would continue to oppose the legislation. The government had on Tuesday indicated it was ready to periodically review the Rs 500 crore cap on liability for operators.

    Karat said the CPM was “more concerned” about provisions in the Bill that make the foreign nuclear reactor suppliers’ liability virtually non-existent. “We feel it is being done to help US companies,” he said.

    The government’s proposal to do away with a provision that gave the Indian operator the right to recourse only if the accident has resulted from a wilful act of gross negligence on the part of the supplier has also not enthused the CPM.

    The BJP, on the other hand, said the government should withdraw the legislation in light of the Bhopal gas tragedy verdict. “The government’s intention is not to safeguard the rights of the Indians, but to please the foreigners. The Bill is aimed at making the US happy,” BJP spokesperson Shahnawaz Hussain said. He also slammed PM Manmohan Singh and UPA chairperson Sonia Gandhi for being silent on the Bhopal verdict.

    http://www.indianexpress.com/news/cpm-bjp-turn-up-heat-on-nliability-bill/631795/
     
  16. AkhandBharat

    AkhandBharat Regular Member

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    MP Govt and some in Centre helped Anderson flee: Sathe

    Former Union Minister Vasant Sathe on Thursday said there was a "collusion" between the Madhya Pradesh government and "some people" in the Centre which allowed former Union Carbide CEO Warren Anderson to escape justice in the Bhopal gas tragedy.

    Sathe, former minister for Information and Broadcasting and Chemicals and Fertilisers, said, "There was a collusion between the state government and some people in the central government, probably in the Home Ministry" during the Narasimha Rao government.

    Asked who could be responsible for the escape of Anderson, Sathe said he could not guess the names of the people but claimed only the then Chief Minister Arjun Singh could reply to queries on this issue.

    "I cannot guess the names of the people...The collector (Moti Singh) says he got orders from the Chief Secretary...Arjun Singh ji knows all the facts. The best person for the media to direct these queries would be Arjun Singh ji," the octogenarian leader said.

    He said that instead of doing an exercise in vacuum, the media should direct questions to Singh to get authentic information on the Anderson issue.

    "After all, he (Anderson) was given the state government plane from Bhopal to Delhi. Obviously there were some people (in Bhopal and Delhi who were responsible)" Sathe said.

    Asked whether the image of the Congress has taken a beating following the revelations about Anderson fleeing the country, Sathe replied in the negative.

    "I cannot blame the party. I don't think Congress as a party was responsible," he added.

    On Thursday, Sathe had said there were "rogue" elements in the government in 1984 who helped Anderson flee the country after the Bhopal tragedy.

    Meanwhile, CWC member Satyavrat Chaturvedi blamed the then Madhya Pradesh government for the episode and said the central government could not be held responsible.

    "The incident took place in Bhopal. The arrest was made by the state government and bail was given to Anderson there the same day. He was sent to Delhi by a state government plane and from there he went to America. No, where do we see the role of the central government? In this we only see the role of the state government," he said.

    Congress had on Wednesday said that those being held responsible should explain.

    A senior party leader, who declined to be identified, said these matters needed to be clarified by those against whom questions are being raised.

    Arjun Singh had met party president Sonia Gandhi soon after the verdict and has since not made any comment on the issue.

    http://www.indianexpress.com/news/mp-govt-and-some-in-centre-helped-anderson-flee-sathe/632032/2
     
  17. Pintu

    Pintu New Member

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    http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/...ave-India-Ambika-Soni/articleshow/6033592.cms

    No minister involved in helping Anderson leave India: Ambika Soni
    IANS, Jun 10, 2010, 07.57pm IST

    NEW DELHI: No central minister had connived to ensure that former Union Carbide chief Warren Anderson left the country four days after the Bhopal gas tragedy, the world's worst industrial disaster, the government asserted Thursday.

    "There is no conclusive evidence to show that any central minister had a role to play in Anderson leaving the country," Information and Broadcasting minister Ambika Soni told reporters here.

    "The very fact that a group of ministers on the Bhopal gas tragedy has been reconstituted shows how serious the government is on the issue. The law minister has also spoken on the issue without delay. Let the committee give its report and we will see how to move forward," she added.

    The committee would, among other things, study the implications of a Bhopal court's judgment Monday sentencing to two years imprisonment seven people, including Keshub Mahindra, the chairman of Union Carbide India, when the Dec 2-3, 1984 gas tragedy occurred.

    The sentence has sparked outrage among activists and other Indian citizens for being too little too late.

    Soni, however, refused to comment on a statement by Congress leader Digvijay Singh that Anderson had been permitted to go scot-free under US pressure.

    "I would not like to comment on that," she said.

    Anderson was arrested Dec 7, 1984 but was immediately granted bail by a Bhopal court. He was thereafter flown in a state government aircraft to New Delhi from where he boarded a flight out of the country.

    On Thursday, a former director of aviation at Bhopal and a pilot both claimed that the Madhya Pradesh chief minister's office had instructed them to fly Anderson to Delhi.

    "We got a call from the chief minister's office and were asked to arrange a flight," former director of aviation, Bhopal, R.S. Sodhi. Senior Congress leader Arjun Singh was then the Madhya Pradesh chief minister and wielded considerable clout in the Congress, both at the centre and in the state.

    At the time of the Bhopal gas tragedy, Digvijay Singh was the agriculture minister in Arjun Singh's cabinet.

    Digvijay Singh was elected to the Lok Sabha in December 1984 held in the wake of then prime minister Indira Gandhi's assassination. He was the Madhya Pradesh chief minister 1993-2003.

    Meanwhile, a fresh controversy erupted Thursday when it became known that Abhishek Manu Singhvi, the Congress spokesperson and a member of the Lok Sabha, had represented Dow Chemicals, which had purchased the parent Union Carbide company.

    Singhvi, however, denied any wrongdoing or conflict of interest.

    "I have no idea of this charge (conflict of interest), as you call it...it is laughable. This is an old case...it involves only the threshold legal question - whether Dow is same as, or even remotely related to - Union Carbide India Limited (UCIL). For three-four years, these NGOs have been trying to prove Dow and UCIL are the same. Courts have not accepted this...the application is still pending," he said.

    "I represent Dow Chemicals as a senior counsel, I don't deal with them directly with them," he said on the phone from Yale, where he is currently leading an Indian delegation.
     
  18. ajtr

    ajtr Veteran Member Veteran Member

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    INC has put out damage control spokespersons mouthing platitudes about extradition etc after the horse has bolted the custody.The CBI (B Lal) pointed the finger at the civil adminstration for the release of Warren Anderson.
    Collector (Moti Singh) posts to Chief Secy Madhay Pradesh.Civil Adminstration pointed to Delhi Cabinet member.Right now Arjun Singh is the fall guy.Lets see who he points to for its higher than him.If its not resolved it could lead to severe political losses.

    Bhopal’s many betrayals




    Spotlight on judges who ruled in favour of Union carbide

     
  19. AkhandBharat

    AkhandBharat Regular Member

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    Chouhan questions Arjun Singh on Anderson

    NEW DELHI: Madhya Pradesh chief minister Shivraj Singh Chouhan on Friday said his government will go to any extent to get justice for Bhopal gas victims and demanded an explanation from then chief minister Arjun Singh on how former Union Carbide CEO Warren Anderson fled the country.

    "We will go to any extent to get justice for the victims...This is not an issue of Bhopal or the state. It should act as an example of how to give punishment in such cases," he told reporters here.

    Noting that the people of the state felt "let down" following the gas tragedy verdict, Chouhan said he has written to Arjun Singh and asked for a reply on the circumstances that led to Anderson's escape.

    "Let Arjun Singh explain it. Whether he did it (gave permission for providing state aircraft) himself or anybody told him to do so. We want a reply from him if a wrong direction was given. And after all, why such a direction was given.

    "There are lot many questions like why the CBI filed no appeal when the charges in the case were diluted in 1997. If he gives a statement, things would be clear. The state and the country want to know these circumstances," he said.

    Chouhan said a five-member team of legal experts has been set up by the state government to look into the issue and examine what could be done legally to get Bhopal gas victims justice. The interim report of the team would be out in the next ten days, he said.

    Asked about the conflicting statements of Congress leaders like Digvijay Singh and Satyavrat Chaturvedi on Anderson fleeing the country, Chouhan said he did not want to politicise the issue but added that this was only leading to confusion.

    "Somebody is saying the Centre is responsible while somebody else says the issues comes under the state. Different people are speaking in different voices...One wants to protect somebody while the other wants to trap someone else.

    "This is leading to confusion... Arjun Singh should speak the truth. What other Congress leaders are speaking is only bringing out the contradictions within the Congress party," he said.

    He said that his government is open to all options and will decide after the committee report on whether to constitute a probe commission go into the lapses or take up the issue with US courts.

    http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/india/Chouhan-questions-Arjun-Singh-on-Anderson/articleshow/6037153.cms
     
  20. AkhandBharat

    AkhandBharat Regular Member

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    Bhopal gas verdict anguishing: Kalam

    INDORE: Former President of India A P J Abul Kalam has termed as "anguishing" the court verdict in Bhopal gas tragedy and said "the output of law and judiciary was not proportionate to the sufferings of the people."

    "I read about the verdict and I personally feel that the verdict which came after around 26 years of Bhopal gas tragedy is anguishing," Kalam said here in reply to a question during a programme held at Indore Press Club yesterday.

    The former President said law and judiciary should treat all citizens as equal. They should not differentiate between them whether they are poor or rich.

    To a question, he said, "How can I raise a question on a court verdict? But about the verdict in Bhopal gas tragedy, I have a strong personal feeling that the output of law and judiciary was not proportionate to the sufferings of the people."

    A quarter century after the world's worst industrial disaster that killed over 15,000 people, a local court on June 7 convicted former Union Carbide India Chairman Keshub Mahindra and seven others in the Bhopal Gas tragedy case and awarded them a maximum of two years imprisonment.

    However, there was no word about Warren Anderson, the then Chairman of Union Carbide Corporation of USA, in the judgement delivered by CJM Mohan P Tiwari, 23 years after the trial commenced.

    89-year-old Anderson, who lives in the US, left the country soon after the tragedy and was declared an absconder.

    The verdict has came under attack from various sections of society, including civil rights activists and political parties.

    http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/india/Bhopal-gas-verdict-anguishing-Kalam/articleshow/6036889.cms
     
  21. Yusuf

    Yusuf GUARDIAN Administrator

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    The damn problem is that there are no good laws in India to get those people punished Just yesterday, Veerappa Moily was talking about such a law to be enacted to bring Class Action Suits, both criminal and civil that could severely punish people responsible for such things.

    http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/...or-huge-damages-Moily/articleshow/6029181.cms

    We need to get this law ASAP more so as India becomes even more integrated into the world economy and foreign companies come to India to take advantage of the huge market India give them. No one should just go unpunished when they play with the lives of Indians.

    In the current case the law itself is inadequate to try those people. They surely cant be tried under 302 or something.
     
    Last edited: Jun 11, 2010

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