'Better to be alive in a camp than dead in village'

Discussion in 'Politics & Society' started by Ray, Oct 21, 2013.

  1. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    Better to be alive in a camp than dead in village

    LOI MUZAFFARNAGAR): Four months ago, when Sameena informed her husband about her pregnancy, sweets were distributed in her village, Phugana. Today, as she stands outside the black tarpaulin tent held with a bamboo, she asks this reporter about abortion, mistaking her for a health official. "I don't want the baby to be born here in this rut," she says, with guilt in her eyes.

    Sameena was a part of a group of 36 men and women who had fled their houses on September 8 after armed men hounded them. They saw the arson from the nearby sugarcane fields where they hid for a night.

    One of the families in the group had relatives in Loi, around 18 km from Phugana. Choosing their destination, therefore, wasn't difficult. After spending a night in the field, they set out on a hard journey snaking through sugarcane fields, skirting the highway. It took them more than a day to reach the camp.

    "There were around 11 weeping kids with us. One of the mothers tied a handkerchief round the mouth of her child as she wouldn't stop crying," said Sameena.

    It has been a month since around 3,500 displaced men and women have been living in this camp. Until a month back, they were living in harmony with the Jats in their villages. But the three murders in Kanwal and neighbouring Malikpur fueled vicious communal riots that swept across western UP, killing 62 people and leaving 40,000 people homeless. "It's better to be alive in a camp than dead in a village," said Qabilana.

    As one enters a tent, the smell of unwashed bodies fills the space along with charpoy and stove. That's because there's no provision for bathrooms. While men go to nearby farm and wash themselves under the tubewell, for women there's no solution. "We don't have clothes to change into," said Ruksana, her eyes kohl-lined and hair unkempt for days.

    With no spare clothes, the seven days of menstrual phase are more worrisome than thoughts of an uncertain future. "The tent in the left corner is reserved for menstruating women," whispered Qabilana so that the men around her don't hear.

    There are 76 pregnant women in the camp and 19 babies have been delivered in the past month. Varisha Begum birthed a baby boy on Bakrid, considered very auspicious. She went into labour in the morning but with no doctor around, a woman with some experience as a midwife charged Rs 20 to help her deliver. But as per official records, there are three general medical practitioners and six Ayush lady doctors at Loi to attend to the ill, and pregnant women. In Muzaffarnagar, there were a total of 196 pregnant women.

    Farkunda is heavily pregnant and has high fever. Her husband asks her to sit up to tell her condition, she tries hard but can't. "No medical help is coming from the government and people are dying here. Eight people died in the camp," said Shah Faisal, who keeps a red diary with details of births and deaths.

    Interestingly, government officials said that on October 11, an NHRC team visited Loi after an NGO complained of eight deaths. "After investigating the charges, NHRC found that the claims were wrong and that six deaths were reported. Of these, two were elderly, two children aged six and 11 respectively, who died of a neuro-cerebral dysfunction, while two infants deaths were recorded," said Kaushal Raj Sharma, district magistrate.

    One of the families in the group had relatives in Loi, around 18 km from Phugana. Choosing their destination, therefore, wasn't difficult. After spending a night in the field, they set out on a hard journey snaking through sugarcane fields, skirting the highway. It took them more than a day to reach the camp.

    "There were around 11 weeping kids with us. One of the mothers tied a handkerchief round the mouth of her child as she wouldn't stop crying," said Sameena.

    It has been a month since around 3,500 displaced men and women have been living in this camp. Until a month back, they were living in harmony with the Jats in their villages. But the three murders in Kanwal and neighbouring Malikpur fueled vicious communal riots that swept across western UP, killing 62 people and leaving 40,000 people homeless. "It's better to be alive in a camp than dead in a village," said Qabilana.

    As one enters a tent, the smell of unwashed bodies fills the space along with charpoy and stove. That's because there's no provision for bathrooms. While men go to nearby farm and wash themselves under the tubewell, for women there's no solution. "We don't have clothes to change into," said Ruksana, her eyes kohl-lined and hair unkempt for days.

    With no spare clothes, the seven days of menstrual phase are more worrisome than thoughts of an uncertain future. "The tent in the left corner is reserved for menstruating women," whispered Qabilana so that the men around her don't hear.

    There are 76 pregnant women in the camp and 19 babies have been delivered in the past month. Varisha Begum birthed a baby boy on Bakrid, considered very auspicious. She went into labour in the morning but with no doctor around, a woman with some experience as a midwife charged Rs 20 to help her deliver. But as per official records, there are three general medical practitioners and six Ayush lady doctors at Loi to attend to the ill, and pregnant women. In Muzaffarnagar, there were a total of 196 pregnant women.

    Farkunda is heavily pregnant and has high fever. Her husband asks her to sit up to tell her condition, she tries hard but can't. "No medical help is coming from the government and people are dying here. Eight people died in the camp," said Shah Faisal, who keeps a red diary with details of births and deaths.

    Interestingly, government officials said that on October 11, an NHRC team visited Loi after an NGO complained of eight deaths. "After investigating the charges, NHRC found that the claims were wrong and that six deaths were reported. Of these, two were elderly, two children aged six and 11 respectively, who died of a neuro-cerebral dysfunction, while two infants deaths were recorded," said Kaushal Raj Sharma, district magistrate.

    One of the families in the group had relatives in Loi, around 18 km from Phugana. Choosing their destination, therefore, wasn't difficult. After spending a night in the field, they set out on a hard journey snaking through sugarcane fields, skirting the highway. It took them more than a day to reach the camp.

    "There were around 11 weeping kids with us. One of the mothers tied a handkerchief round the mouth of her child as she wouldn't stop crying," said Sameena.

    It has been a month since around 3,500 displaced men and women have been living in this camp. Until a month back, they were living in harmony with the Jats in their villages. But the three murders in Kanwal and neighbouring Malikpur fueled vicious communal riots that swept across western UP, killing 62 people and leaving 40,000 people homeless. "It's better to be alive in a camp than dead in a village," said Qabilana.

    As one enters a tent, the smell of unwashed bodies fills the space along with charpoy and stove. That's because there's no provision for bathrooms. While men go to nearby farm and wash themselves under the tubewell, for women there's no solution. "We don't have clothes to change into," said Ruksana, her eyes kohl-lined and hair unkempt for days.

    With no spare clothes, the seven days of menstrual phase are more worrisome than thoughts of an uncertain future. "The tent in the left corner is reserved for menstruating women," whispered Qabilana so that the men around her don't hear.

    There are 76 pregnant women in the camp and 19 babies have been delivered in the past month. Varisha Begum birthed a baby boy on Bakrid, considered very auspicious. She went into labour in the morning but with no doctor around, a woman with some experience as a midwife charged Rs 20 to help her deliver. But as per official records, there are three general medical practitioners and six Ayush lady doctors at Loi to attend to the ill, and pregnant women. In Muzaffarnagar, there were a total of 196 pregnant women.

    Farkunda is heavily pregnant and has high fever. Her husband asks her to sit up to tell her condition, she tries hard but can't. "No medical help is coming from the government and people are dying here. Eight people died in the camp," said Shah Faisal, who keeps a red diary with details of births and deaths.

    Interestingly, government officials said that on October 11, an NHRC team visited Loi after an NGO complained of eight deaths. "After investigating the charges, NHRC found that the claims were wrong and that six deaths were reported. Of these, two were elderly, two children aged six and 11 respectively, who died of a neuro-cerebral dysfunction, while two infants deaths were recorded," said Kaushal Raj Sharma, district magistrate.

    'Better to be alive in a camp than dead in village' - Times Of India

    *************************************************************************


    This is the India that is a disgraceful reality.

    Riots affect all the communities which are involved.

    This is the divide which poltical shenanigans have bequeathed to the citizens.

    The lessons learnt after the Partition, it seems, have been forgotten!
     
    Last edited: Oct 21, 2013
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  3. Decklander

    Decklander New Member

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    @Ray sir, these people must ask their own religion people the question rather than blame Hindus for their plight. What wrong did those Hindus do while returning back to their villages after mahapanchayat when they were waylaid and attacked in a well planned well rehersed attack by muslim mobs from mosques? who guided and organised them? Who distributed guns from Munger in Mujaffernagar to only muslims? Who incited these muslims? AND why did they get carried away? What you sow is what you shall reap.
    SP goons did it all and they voted SP to power in UP. It is their and only their fault. We have learnt lessons from Partition and that is that Muslims will never get well educated as for them madarsa education is deen kee shiksha while modern knowledge is haraam.
     
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  4. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    This whole issue is murky and there is more to it than what meets the eye.

    I am not commenting on what the headline indicates or suggests.

    I am only concerned about the manner how the country has been held to ransom with Vote Bank politics and created schisms wherein people draw aggrieved compulsions and lament, without keeping the intrigues that go on to divide the Nation for Vote Bank politics.

    No party involved is above suspicion.
     
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  5. VIP

    VIP Ultra Nationalist Senior Member

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    Can we hear something about Jats, too ?? Well, government of mulla mulayam isn't helping Muslims, I'm not surprised.
     
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  6. drkrn

    drkrn Senior Member Senior Member

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    the facts about these riots are still unclear.they attacked people with guns:shocked:
    what do they get out of it.not even one festival is there at that time
     
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  7. drkrn

    drkrn Senior Member Senior Member

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    here the article states clearly(though unmentioned)the plight of muslims.

    what about hindus who suffered from riots.any mentioning
     
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  8. Eesh

    Eesh Regular Member

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    Hindus? NHRC is concerned with humans only. Anyway, as per the proposed Communal Violence Bill, Hindus are perpetual culprits.

    These Jats should thank their stars that the bill is not a law, otherwise their property would have been confiscated and given over to perpetual victims ie muslims.
     
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  9. Decklander

    Decklander New Member

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    Why can't we replace majority with Perpatuators and minority with victims in the prevention of communal violence bill? It will not happen as congress wants to give a licence to muslims to kill hindus. Is it not a fact that minority and majority changes from state to state, district to district and village to village? Why this majority and minority use? If we apply my logic, the muslims will be held responsible for Godhra and also recent muzzafernagar riots. They started them by burning a coach full of hindus and attacking hindus returning to their villages after mahapanchayat.
     
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  10. Eesh

    Eesh Regular Member

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    In that bill it is exactly that.
     
  11. parijataka

    parijataka Senior Member Senior Member

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    By definition of United Nations a minority is a group comprising 2% or less of the population - Muslims numbering around 180 million and 15-20% of the population of India technically do not qualify as a minority but Parsis, Jains, Sikhs and Christians do.

    Muslims should be classified as the second largest majority in India rather than a minority.
     
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  12. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    If one goes by the UN classification, then you are right.

    But, will that happen?

    It is all a use toon of votes.

    I was seeing We The People. The subject was on Parsi.

    Some Parsis lamented that they do not have any reservation in education and so are losing out.

    I never knew that.
     
  13. Decklander

    Decklander New Member

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    Sir you will be surprised to know that any Parsi who earns less than 90k/month in India is classified as poor by Parsi Panchayat and he is provided free house in Mumbai or any city in which he lives.
     
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  14. kseeker

    kseeker Retired

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    Last edited: Oct 23, 2013
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  15. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    I would not know that, but I have seen down and out Parsis.

    I have lived in Bombay and Deolali (then practically a village) and have interacted with the Parsis.

    It is a good thing that the Parsi trusts look after their poor.

    But then, education does not go with money power when others, classified as /minorities' who have no money power, can get reservations

    If Parsis are recognised as 'minorities', then logic states that they should also get the same benefits as other 'minorities'.
     
  16. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    It really does not matter what the media writes or with what slant.

    The points in them are material.

    And you do raise the issue that Indians are treated not as Indians, but as groups, sub groups and thus divide the nation and fan emotional outrage on both sides!

    Divide and Rule!
     
  17. sydsnyper

    sydsnyper Senior Member Senior Member

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    Times of India at its sickular best. Where are the stories of the non-muslims who lost in the riots. I remember during the 91' riots there were very huge number of poor maharashtrians waylaid, daughters lost (which by the way is a regular feature of muslim rioting), ramabai colony burnt down to ashes along with its residents.... and all that these newspapers had to say was for how the muslims suffered.

    The non-muslims picked up and went on with their lives all by themselves, while the muslims were being pandered and sucked up too. All this was in fact way before congress went full blown on its anti-hindu stance.

    I mention mumbai here, because it was something I saw up, close and personal. In fact whenever there were rumors of mobs in our locality (and most of the time they were rumors), the few muslim families in our apartment complex would stay in the houses of their hindu neighbours. They were really given the protection a minority group has always been given among Hindus..... and ironically some of these muslim families that continued to live in our apartment complex over the years objected to the Ganesh Mahotsav celebrations in our complex....

    I dont mean to stoke hatred, I was reminded about what I saw as unjust over the years when I saw this article.

    A week back or so, I saw the same crap, pro-muslim, anti-hindu article in NY Times. The petro dollars have been doing their job well.
     
  18. drkrn

    drkrn Senior Member Senior Member

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    as far as i remember its 10%.can you provide un links.
     
  19. Vishwarupa

    Vishwarupa Senior Member Senior Member

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    U.P. announces Rs. 5 lakh each to riots-hit Muslim families - The Hindu

    ATIQ KHAN
    SHARE · PRINT · T+
    It will help them to make a new beginning, says government

    Forty days after about 1,800 Muslim families were displaced following communal violence in Muzaffarnagar and Shamli, the Uttar Pradesh government announced financial help of Rs. 5 lakh to each family.

    According to an official spokesman, members of the displaced families were still living in relief camps in Muzaffarnagar and Shamli districts and had refused to return to their villages.

    The task of identifying the villages was given to the Muzaffarnagar district administration.

    Accordingly, it identified six villages in Muzaffarnagar and three in Shamli from where the riot victims shifted elsewhere or to the relief camps operating in madrasas.

    Of the 1,800 families, 330 are from Phugana, 205 from Kutba, 58 from Kutbi, 67 from Mohammadpur Rai Singh, 265 from Kakrha and 40 from Mandbaar villages in Muzaffarnagar district.

    In Shamli district, 325 families belong to Lisarh village, 276 are from Laak and 235 from Baharshi village.

    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    i do not want to comment on this.
     
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  20. IndianPatriot

    IndianPatriot Regular Member

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    The crack made by British , as their last hope. They were successful in that. Maybe we can never put an end to this communal clashes , maybe because of religious extremism. Maybe some people just want to see the country burn.

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