Bangladesh hangs Chowdhury and Mujahid over 1971 war crimes

Discussion in 'Subcontinent & Central Asia' started by bose, Nov 22, 2015.

  1. bose

    bose Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Apr 5, 2010
    Messages:
    3,956
    Likes Received:
    2,637
    Location:
    Kolkata, India.
    [​IMG]
    Image copyright AFP

    Image caption Ali Ahsan Mohammad Mujahid (pictured, left) and Salahuddin Quader Chowdhury have been executed

    Two Bangladesh opposition leaders have been executed for war crimes committed during the 1971 independence struggle against Pakistan.

    Salahuddin Quader Chowdhury and Ali Ahsan Mohammad Mujahid were hanged in Dhaka's central jail.

    They were convicted of genocide and rape - charges they denied.

    Chowdhury has been an influential politician - he was elected MP six times. Mujahid was a top leader of Bangladesh's largest Islamist party.

    Home Minister Asaduzzaman Khan said they were hanged after President Abdul Hamid rejected appeals for clemency by the two men.


    However, family members have dismissed reports that the men had made any such appeals, which would have also required admissions of guilt.

    "My father said he did not seek any mercy," Chowdhury's son, Humam Qauder Chowdhury, told AFP news agency, after meeting his father for the last time hours before his execution. "He has always said he's innocent."

    [​IMG]
    Salahuddin Quader Chowdhury
    • Better known as Saqa, he was eldest son of the late Muslim League and Chittagong-based leader Fazlul Quader Chowdhury
    • His father was the speaker of the National Assembly of undivided Pakistan in 1965 and campaigned for a united Pakistan
    • Complained that the tribunal's verdict had come "from the [law] ministry", saying it was on the internet before it was announced in court
    Ali Ahsan Mohammad Mujahid
    • A student leader in 1971, he supported Bangladesh remaining part of Pakistan
    • Went into hiding soon after independence, but resurfaced after Gen Ziaur Rahman came to power in a military coup in 1977
    • Was social welfare minister in the BNP-led government from 2001-2006 and was highly regarded for his organisational skills and oratory
    Bangladesh war crimes trial: Key accused

    [​IMG]
    The Supreme Court upheld their sentences earlier this month.

    Chowdhury was the most senior leader of the opposition Bangladesh Nationalist Party to be sentenced for crimes against humanity.

    Two years ago, a special war crimes tribunal found him guilty of nine out of 23 charges including genocide, arson and persecuting people on religious and political grounds.

    The prosecution said that his father's residence in Chittagong was turned into a torture cell during the war.

    Mujahid was the secretary-general of Jamaat-e-Islami. He was sentenced to death in July 2013.

    He was accused of responsibility for the killings of a number of pro-independence Bangladeshi leaders and intellectuals.

    The tribunal found him guilty of five charges, including abduction and murder.

    Bangladesh's government says the war crimes trials are necessary to bring murderers to justice.

    But the opposition says they have been used to persecute them and human rights groups have said the tribunal does not meet international standards.
    [​IMG]
    Bangladesh independence war, 1971
    [​IMG]

    Image copyright Getty Images
    Image caption The 1971 war lasted only a few months but was fought brutally and bitterly
    • Civil war erupts in Pakistan, pitting the West Pakistan army against East Pakistanis demanding autonomy and later independence
    • Fighting forces an estimated 10 million East Pakistani civilians to flee to India
    • In December, India invades East Pakistan in support of the East Pakistani people
    • Pakistani army surrenders at Dhaka and its army of more than 90,000 become Indian prisoners of war
    • East Pakistan becomes the independent country of Bangladesh on 16 December 1971
    • Exact number of people killed is unclear - Bangladesh says it is three million but independent researchers say it is up to 500,000 fatalities
    SOURCE: http://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-34892606
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 23, 2015
    Illusive, maomao, Screambowl and 3 others like this.
  2.  
  3. bose

    bose Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Apr 5, 2010
    Messages:
    3,956
    Likes Received:
    2,637
    Location:
    Kolkata, India.
    Good Job Hasina !! Go after the rascals ...
     
  4. bose

    bose Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Apr 5, 2010
    Messages:
    3,956
    Likes Received:
    2,637
    Location:
    Kolkata, India.
    BIO Data of the Hate mongers !!

    Source: http://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-20970123

    BBC News profiles the main defendants convicted at the tribunal in Bangladesh investigating war crimes committed during the 1971 war of independence from Pakistan. All have been found guilty - apart from one person - although some are still in the process of appealing to the Supreme Court.

    Ghulam Azam - died in custody
    [​IMG]
    Image caption Mr Azam's supporters revered him as a scholar, but critics viewed him as a traitor
    The former leader of Jamaat-e-Islami, Bangladesh's largest Islamist party, was sentenced to 90 years in jail for crimes against humanity on 15 July 2013.

    Ghulam Azam, who was in his 90s, was the party's leader until 2000 when he retired from active politics. He died in October 2014 while an appeal against his conviction was pending.

    He denied all the charges against him, which included genocide, murder, abduction and arson.

    Azam is alleged to have created and led pro-Pakistan militias which carried out numerous murders and rapes during the nine-month war.


    Described by his party colleagues as a writer and Islamic thinker, Azam was strongly opposed to Bangladesh's independence from Pakistan, arguing at the time that it would divide the Muslim community.

    He also cautioned that an independent Bangladesh would come under the political and economic influence of neighbouring India.

    Azam's supporters say he is widely respected across the Muslim world. But his detractors - mainly in the governing Awami League party - see him as a traitor.

    In 1973, the government cancelled his citizenship for allegedly co-operating with Pakistani forces during the independence war.

    Azam lived as an exile in Pakistan and the UK but returned to Bangladesh in 1978 when the country was led by Gen Ziaur Rahman - the assassinated husband of the country's current opposition leader Khaleda Zia.

    The Supreme Court restored his citizenship in 1994.

    Motiur Rahman Nizami - sentenced to death
    [​IMG]
    Image copyright Getty Images
    Image caption Nizami campaigned vociferously against independence
    The current head of Jamaat-e-Islami was sentenced to death for war crimes in October 2014 but is currently appealing against the sentence.

    Motiur Rahman Nizami, 71, faced 16 charges including genocide, murder, torture and rape. Nizami was born in 1943 and has been an active supporter of the party since he was a student.

    At the time of the 1971 war, he was president of Islami Chhatra Sangha, then the party's student wing, and vociferously campaigned against the division of Pakistan.

    He is accused of setting up the al-Badr group, an auxiliary force that helped the Pakistani army identify and kill pro-independence Bengali activists.

    Nizami, a Dhaka University graduate, has twice been elected to the Bangladeshi parliament, serving as a minister in the Bangladesh Nationalist Party (BNP)-led government between 2001 and 2006.

    He has described the accusations against him as "the worst falsehood in history".

    His supporters consider him to have been a competent and honest minister and an authority on Islamic teaching. They say he is widely respected in the Muslim world. Nizami has written about 20 books, mostly on Islam.

    In 2009, he was judged to be among the top 50 most influential Muslims by an American Islamic think-tank.

    Delwar Hossain Sayeedi - sentenced to life in jail
    [​IMG]
    Image copyright Getty Images
    Image caption Sayeedi has previously travelled to the US and Europe to give lectures on the Koran
    A prolific speaker and a well-known leader of the Jamaat-e-Islami, the 72-year-old former MP had his death sentence overturned on appeal and is now serving life in jail.

    He was found guilty in February 2013 of charges including murder, torture and rape.

    Arrested in June 2010, he was the first suspect to be indicted by the tribunal in 2011.

    State prosecutors accused him of working with the al-Badr group during the independence struggle and of carrying out numerous atrocities, including forcibly converting Hindus to Islam.

    His critics say that during the war he formed a small group to loot and seize the property of Bengali Hindus and those who supported independence.

    He denied all the allegations and after he was convicted there were widespread protests across Dhaka.

    Sayeedi's supporters say that - like many of his co-accused - he is an Islamic scholar and a conscientious member of various social organisations.

    He has travelled to the US and Europe to give lectures on the Koran and has written books on interpreting Islam.

    Some British MPs opposed his visit to the UK in 2006 because of his alleged extreme views, particularly his comments against the US and British role in Afghanistan and Iraq.

    Ali Ahsan Mohammad Mujahid - executed in November 2015
    [​IMG]
    Image copyright AFP
    Image caption Ali Ahsan Mohammad Mujahid was regarded for his oratory
    Ali Ahsan Mohammad Mujahid, 64, was the secretary-general of Jamaat-e-Islami and an influential figure within the party. He was executed in November 2015 after being sentenced to death in July 2013 - a decision that was upheld in June 2015 when the Supreme Court rejected his appeal.

    He was highly regarded for his organisational skills and oratory. He was social welfare minister in the BNP-led government from 2001-2006. A student leader in 1971, he was among those who supported Bangladesh remaining part of Pakistan.

    His critics say he was also an al-Badr leader responsible for the killings of a number of pro-independence Bangladeshi leaders and intellectuals.

    He strongly denied the allegations but the tribunal found him guilty of five charges, including abduction and murder.

    Like many other Jamaat leaders he went into hiding soon after independence, but resurfaced after Gen Ziaur Rahman came to power in a military coup in 1977.

    His supporters say his trial was nothing but a political vendetta by the ruling Awami League.

    They also say he was a successful minister known for his honesty and integrity.

    Salahuddin Quader Chowdhury - executed in November 2015
    [​IMG]
    Image caption Salahuddin Chowdhury was convicted of genocide and murder
    A former minister, Salahuddin Quader Chowdhury was a BNP MP and the most senior leader from the party to be sentenced for crimes against humanity. He was executed in November 2015 after the Supreme Court rejected his appeal in June 2015.

    Better known as Saqa, he was the eldest son of the late Muslim League and Chittagong-based leader Fazlul Quader Chowdhury and a member of the BNP's main policymaking body.

    His father was the speaker of the National Assembly of undivided Pakistan in 1965 and campaigned for a united Pakistan.

    The tribunal found him guilty of nine out of 23 charges including genocide, arson and persecuting people on religious and political grounds.

    He was also accused of forcefully converting a number of Hindus to Islam.

    The prosecution said that his father's residence in Chittagong was turned into a torture cell during the war. Chowdhury denied all the charges and the BNP - which did not exist at the time of the war - described his trial as a political vendetta.

    Chowdhury complained at the time of his conviction that the verdict had come "from the [law] ministry", saying it had been made available on the internet before it was formally announced in court.

    Chowdhury's family alleged he was tortured while in custody. The authorities rejected the allegations.

    Muhammad Kamaruzzaman - executed in April 2015
    [​IMG]
    Image copyright Bengalpix
    Image caption Kamaruzzaman's lawyers said he did not receive a fair trail
    The assistant secretary-general of Jamaat-e-Islami was found guilty in May 2013 of masterminding what the prosecution described as one of the bloodiest single episodes in the independence war.

    The Supreme Court later upheld his death sentence on appeal and he was hanged in April 2015.

    The war crimes tribunal heard that he played a prominent role alongside Pakistani troops in the "slaughter" of at least 120 unarmed farmers in the remote northern village of Sohagpur which subsequently became known as the "village of widows".

    Three women widowed as a result of the killings testified against Kamaruzzaman during his trial. They described how he led Pakistani troops to the village and helped the soldiers to line up and execute the farmers.

    Kamaruzzaman was found guilty on five out of seven charges of crimes against humanity, including the murder and torture of unarmed civilians. His lawyers insisted that he did not receive a fair trial.

    Working as a journalist after independence, Kamaruzzaman tried on several occasions to become an MP but was unsuccessful in each attempt.

    Abdul Kader Mullah - hanged December 2013
    [​IMG]
    Image copyright AFP
    Image caption Abdul Kader Mullah was convicted in February 2013 and hanged in December
    Abdul Kader Mullah, assistant secretary general of the Jamaat-e-Islami party since 2010 and a former executive editor of The Daily Sangram, was found guilty on five of six counts of crimes against humanity and war crimes on 5 February 2013.

    He was sentenced to death in September of that year after a failed appeal and hanged in December.

    Mullah, who denied all the charges, was convicted of killing 344 civilians as well as rape and other crimes. Many of the atrocities for which he was convicted took place in Dhaka's Mirpur area, earning him the name "Butcher of Mirpur".

    He was sentenced by the tribunal to life in prison - which caused huge anger among many Bangladeshis who took to the streets demanding he be put to death. Prosecution and defence lawyers appealed to the Supreme Court. On 17 September the court increased his life jail term to a death sentence.

    Mullah was born in 1948 in Faridpur district. He joined Jamaat's student wing, then known as Islami Chatra Sangha (ICS), while studying for a science degree at Rajendra College in Faridpur in 1966. When leaders of the Jamaat opposed the independence movement in East Pakistan in 1971, Mullah joined the feared paramilitary force al-Badr, prosecutors said.

    He was charged in December 2011 with abetting the Pakistani army and actively participating in the 1971 atrocities. Following his death sentence the attorney general ruled out an appeal, meaning his only chance of clemency would have been a presidential pardon.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 23, 2015
    maomao, Lions Of Punjab and mikhail like this.
  5. thethinker

    thethinker Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Dec 18, 2013
    Messages:
    2,196
    Likes Received:
    2,791
    Location:
    India
    Pakistan deeply disturbed by Bangladesh executions: FO
    Mateen Haider — Published about 4 hours ago

    http://www.dawn.com/news/1221498/pakistan-deeply-disturbed-by-bangladesh-executions-fo

    ISLAMABAD: Pakistan is deeply disturbed by the executions this morning of the Bangladesh Nationalist Party leader and Jamaat-e-Islami secretary general who were both charged with 1971 war crimes, the Foreign Office said.

    Bangladesh Nationalist Party leader Salahuddin Quader Chowdhury and Jamaat-e-Islami secretary general Ali Ahsan Mohammad Mujahid were "hanged together, at the same time" at 12:55 am (local time) at Dhaka Central Jail in the nation's capital, Senior Jail Superintendent Mohammad Jahangir Kabir told The Associated Press.

    Chowdhury had been convicted on of charges of torture, rape and genocide during the country's independence war, while Mujahid was found guilty on charges of genocide, conspiracy in killing intellectuals, torture and abduction.

    "We have noted with deep concern and anguish the unfortunate executions of the Bangladesh National Party Leader, Mr. Salahuddin Quader Chowdhury and Mr Ali Ahsan Mujahid," Foreign Office Spokesman Qazi Khalilullah said in a statement.

    The spokesman said Pakistan also took notice of the international community's reaction to the flawed trials in Bangladesh related to the events of 1971.

    Jamaat-e-Islami and the Bangladesh Nationalist Party say the trials were politically motivated. Bangaldeshi Prime Minister Sheikh Hasina has denied the allegations, but acknowledged that she faced international pressure for trying opposition figures for war crimes,

    Human Rights Watch said the tribunal allowed the prosecution to call 41 witnesses, while Chowdhury's defense was limited to four witnesses. The New York-based group said Mujahid was sentenced to death for instigating his subordinates to commit abuses, although no subordinates testified or were identified.

    Khalilullah said there is a need for reconciliation in Bangladesh in accordance with the spirit of the Bangladesh, India, Pakistan Agreement of April 9, 1974, which he said calls for a forward-looking approach in matters relating to 1971.

    The spokesman addressed hope that such an action would foster goodwill and harmony.
     
  6. bose

    bose Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Apr 5, 2010
    Messages:
    3,956
    Likes Received:
    2,637
    Location:
    Kolkata, India.
    @rockey 71 is in a state of shock ... Where is Begum Khalida Zia these days ?? :)
     
    Last edited: Nov 22, 2015
  7. aditya g

    aditya g Regular Member

    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2014
    Messages:
    682
    Likes Received:
    828
    Location:
    India
    Justice being served. You know Bangladesh had gone to the dogs when these genocidal maniacs were ministers and ruling the same people they slaughtered. But suddenly the direction has changed to one of hope and progress.

    I hope BD will eradicate the ghosts of '71 and assure all citizens including Hindus a bright future.

    Pakis are really gutsy to come out with statements like 'deeply disturbed' after fully knowing what they did to Bangladesh.
     
    maomao, TrueSpirit2 and bose like this.
  8. Hari Sud

    Hari Sud Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2012
    Messages:
    1,054
    Likes Received:
    862
    Location:
    Ontario
    Justice is served, even if Pakistan does not like it.
     
    maomao likes this.
  9. Agnostic_Indian

    Agnostic_Indian Regular Member

    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2010
    Messages:
    930
    Likes Received:
    241
    Location:
    Kerala
    This will strengthen the secular forces in bengladesh and losen the grip of islamic forces and Pakistan. India should do more to support the awami league govt.
     
  10. Bengal_Tiger

    Bengal_Tiger Regular Member

    Joined:
    Nov 22, 2015
    Messages:
    189
    Likes Received:
    450
    One of the best ways that India can help Bangladesh is to use its leverage to push GCC states, particularly Saudi Arabia, to stop supporting terrorists, radicals, Jamaatis and pro-Pakistan forces against Bangladesh.

    Saudi Arabia views Bangladesh through the prism of its friendship with Pakistan and its love for Jamaatis, thus wants a Bangladesh which is spiritually "east Pakistan".

    India can say:

    - India is a neighbour of Bangladesh and is impacted directly by what goes on there e.g in 1971 millions of refugees went there from BD, India is more impacted by Bangladesh then Saudi Arabia is, or the impact of Pakistan on Saudi Arabia too.

    - Just as India does not interfere in Saudi Arabia's neighbourhood e.g. supporting Houthis, Hizbullah, Saudi should not interfere in India's zone by supporting avowedly anti-Indian forces and that this would be regarded as a hostile act.

    - Imposing a labour ban on Bangladesh as the Saudis have done merely as a punitive action for the emergence of a non-pro Pakistani government in Dhaka is a hostile act. To be fair it is well within reason to argue it might be morally unfortunate but politically it is not India's issue. Fair enough, but just as Saudi is helping out its buddy Pakistan by bullying Bangladesh, India can help Bangladesh out by telling Saudi to stop bullying Bangladesh and make us lose billions of dollars in revenue through lost expatriate remittances.

    An economically prosperous Bangladesh is good for India and vice versa. EU states help each other. South Asians should too. Pakistan however can be excluded from that as they are bigots and maniacs who have hatred for India and Hindus pumping intensely through their veins.


    Turkey is another hostile, pro-Pakistan, pro-Jamaat power but has far less leverage over us than Saudi does.

    If India does do something like this it will be interesting to see the Saudi response.
     
  11. Sakal Gharelu Ustad

    Sakal Gharelu Ustad Detests Jholawalas Moderator

    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2012
    Messages:
    6,683
    Likes Received:
    6,665
    Do you contacts in Bangladesh, who can tell more about the impact of these hangings? And how many people support this action by Bangladesh Govt? Are there protests by Jamaat? etc.
     
    TrueSpirit2 likes this.
  12. Mad Indian

    Mad Indian Proud Bigot Veteran Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2012
    Messages:
    12,830
    Likes Received:
    7,524
    Location:
    Podigai Hills.
    Why the hell would Saudis do that when they want exactly what Porkis want in Bangladesh? Seriously? Who do you think funds the jamaati filth in your country or even the porkis for that matter?


    And why should India or any other country give a damn about what you people do so long as it doesn't directly affect us? Your citizens are not smart enough by themselves that they cannot understand that what Saudis and their lapdogs - jamaatis are doing is wrong, by themselves? And if India or any other country for that matter does interfere, won't majority of the jamaati scum use it as an excuse for upping their ante against India anyway?
     
    TrueSpirit2 and DingDong like this.
  13. Bengal_Tiger

    Bengal_Tiger Regular Member

    Joined:
    Nov 22, 2015
    Messages:
    189
    Likes Received:
    450
    1. Most people in Bangladesh hate Jamaat, we even call them "chagu" (a derogatory term for them). They should have - and would have - faced the same fate as the Nazi party in Bangladesh i.e. be permanently banned but the Saudis stepped in and blackmailed us to allowing them to operate legally, later on with their allies,the BNP, war criminals obtained senior governmental positions.

    The Awami League government in fact had an alliance with Jamaat years earlier, but the war crimes trials are a reaction to popular Bengali demands for justice against war criminals. The late writer Jahanara Begum was a key figure in advocating war trials and clashed with Hasina over this. So the war crimes trials are not Awami League driven, but people driven, and the Awami League puts itself at risk for carrying out these actions e.g. revenge from Jamaat, Pakistan, and foreign Islamists.

    2. The impact of these executions is far less both domestically and internationally (Muslim states and Islamist organizations) than the Qader Molla execution in 2012. Almost a non-reaction in comparison.

    3. The Jamaatis have invariably called for a general strike, an almost routine act in Bangladeshi politics especially in the past, but nobody cares.

    4. Beyond Bangladesh itself, the Saudis who host 2 million Bangladeshi workers and can thus damage Bangladesh severely in economic terms could care less, Pakistan is of course naturally barking in defence of its assets (Jamaat in Bangladesh is ultimately controlled by the Pakistani army and ISI).

    5. Most Bangladeshis will support executions of murderers, though some have reservations on how well the trials are observing legal norms, and for most the biggest hassle of this whole affair is temporary sporadic lack of access to social media. Other than that most young Bangladeshis are probably more concerned with Bangladesh v Zimbabwe.
     
  14. Bengal_Tiger

    Bengal_Tiger Regular Member

    Joined:
    Nov 22, 2015
    Messages:
    189
    Likes Received:
    450
    1. What goes on in Bangladesh does affect India, heck if the USA a few thousand miles away considers Bangladeshi affairs of relevance to it and issues statements, what about India next door. Prevention is better than cure, and preventing the rise of an anti-Indian, anti-Hindu fascist party like Jamaat is in India's interests. Actually in real terms it is India approaching Bangladesh for a clamp down on the Jamaat than the other way round. It is in some ways more India-driven than Bangladesh driven.

    If Jamaat is strong in Bangladesh it will seek to turn Bangladesh in to a giant ISI terrorist base against India, which it basically did partially a few years back.

    2. Most Bangladeshis hate Jamaat but our hands have been tied as the Saudis have 2 million Bangladeshi workers in their state which provide much needed remittance. It is only due to Saudi support for this anti-Indian organization that they exist. Thus in order to block foreign support for Jamaat we need another foreign power to counter the Saudis.

    3. At the very least the Indian MEA (Ministry of External Affairs) can request the Saudis to stop supporting anti-Indian radicals in their neighbouring state. The worst the Saudis can say is no. India loses nothing.

    However it puts the Saudis in a very awkard position, "No we won't stop supporting anti-Indian terrorists in a country very far away from us, which borders you".

    If the Saudis have interests in Syria, which doesn't even share a border with Saudi, then India definitely has interests in 160 million strong Bangladesh which it has the longest border with (longer than the Indo-Pak border).

    Anyway I know how the Saudis work. A firm request by the MEA to stop interfering in the affairs of India's neighbourhood, followed by the deployment of a nuclear submarine to the Arabian gulf or near it as a *friendly* reminder of India's nuclear capability will help convince the Saudis to stop this.

    The people at south block are actually quite concerned with the Jamaat/Pakistan in Bangladesh and have been very active in this regard and I know would take my suggestions seriously.

    4. Jamaat is a corrupt organization fundamentally which uses Islamic rhetoric but is power hungry and money hungry e.g. they stole money earmarked for Rohingya refugees sent by Arabs. They can not stoke hatred against India if Bangladeshi society without Saudi interference is freely allowed to express its natural hatred and revulsion of pro-Pakistan forces like Jamaat, who actually are rejected by the majority of the religious community in Bangladesh too due to their war crimes.
     
    maomao, TrueSpirit2 and bose like this.
  15. Mad Indian

    Mad Indian Proud Bigot Veteran Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2012
    Messages:
    12,830
    Likes Received:
    7,524
    Location:
    Podigai Hills.
    OK, but does it need India to do all this? Can't Bangladeshis realise this on their own?

    Makes sense. But, why would Saudi act on Jamaatis, when jamaati scum are only doing what Saudi wants? This like asking a dog to stop waving its tails

    Except, they would just deny any Saudi involvement of funding the jamaati. No one in their right mind is just going to say no. Even porkis don't. They would just deny their involvement. That is all.

    Again, what can we do unless Bangladeshis themselves want something done? Is it too hard for you to see that Indians can do jack so long as Bangladeshis don't act on their own against jamaati?

    I don't think so. Everyone knows what Saudis are and yet no one calls them out. Why?

    Really? If they are rejected by Bangladeshi govt and its people, they would be behind bars now.
     
    maomao and TrueSpirit2 like this.
  16. bose

    bose Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Apr 5, 2010
    Messages:
    3,956
    Likes Received:
    2,637
    Location:
    Kolkata, India.
    @Bengal_Tiger The position with India is such that if you do any good then also India is dammed... if not then also dammed... In Bengali what we call Shankeer Koraat [ saw that cuts both ways]...
     
    maomao and TrueSpirit2 like this.
  17. Bengal_Tiger

    Bengal_Tiger Regular Member

    Joined:
    Nov 22, 2015
    Messages:
    189
    Likes Received:
    450
    We can do everything internally, but if the Saudis blackmail us that they will remove our workers - 2 million, our hands are tied, as we are a poor country and rely on this. This is the very reason Jamaat existed or like the Nazi party in Germany they would have been permanently banned, i.e. they only exist due to the Saudis. The Saudis have already blocked all new labour from Bangladesh starting from 2008 when the Awami League govt came in to power.

    Saudis have no reason to do this. You are totally right but if they feel that India would be angered by this and it would endanger their ties with the multi-trillion dollar economy, nuclear power and market of 1 billion + that is India, than Bangladesh is a non-issue. Do you think they actually help their Paki buddies over Kashmir? No.

    They don't deny funding Jamaat, they have decreased support for the Jamaat and the BNP considerably in the past few years, recently the Saudi embassy in the UK banned Khaleda's son from visiting Mecca (for umrah) where he would have met his mother, this used to be a routine event, getting a visa should have been a formality.

    Behind closed doors everyone has intel, everyone are adults, forget about the media and regular citizens, if India says to Saudi to stop backing the Jamaat they will have to give a response.[/QUOTE]

    Tackling Jamaatis is primarily our responsibility but remember Jamaat are simply a non-military division of the Pakistan army embedded within Bangladeshi territory for the purpose of promoting Pakistani interests which is mainly to destabilize "evil Hindu India". Bangladeshis are working hard against Jamaat. Recently, 1,500 BNP-Jamaat activists were arrested. Their cadres, party, infrastructure is far weaker than a few years ago. At this rate if the AL govt continues they will face extinction including due to higher economic standards which naturally lead to a decrease in extreme fundamentalism and a more educated electorate. In Bangladesh a more educated population means one more versed with the brutality of the Jamaat.

    Saud family no.1 priority is power and if they feel this is threatened they will compromise on anything. Yes these thugs get away with a lot. I am not sure if India has ever strongly asked the Saudi regime to stop supporting Jamaat, a mere verbal request entails:

    1. No spending of money
    2. No deployment of troops
    3. No fighting

    It's free. If the Saudis say no, they say no. Nothing however was lost and at the very least nuclear power India has conveyed to Saudi their awareness of support for the Jamaat and displeasure with it.

    Saudis need to be careful. The Arab spring threw over rulers in Libya, Egypt, Tunisia etc. They have a hot war in Yemen which they are losing, they are in deep financial trouble. They cannot go afford to pick fights with India.

    They are. Not only are they behind bars, they are being executed, as Mujahid was a few days ago. Ghulam Azam, Sayeedi, Mujahid, Nizami were or are behind bars. Their top leadership is in prison.

    Many of the upper-middle or middle level leaders and cadres are behind bars too.

    They are banned in the sense they cannot contest elections, but are allowed to exist. Some say if they are banned they will go underground and more radical elements espousing violence will take over, whereas if they are allowed and operating officially they are not so dangerous.


    Anyway it's up to India to do what is in India's own interests. I am merely suggesting telling the Saudis to stop backing Jamaat, it does not cost India a single rupee to merely say that.

    If the Saudis refuse nothing has been lost. If they agree then a violently anti-Indian, anti-Hindu terrorist organization and irregular division of the Pakistan army has lost its biggest backer!
     
    TrueSpirit2 likes this.
  18. Bengal_Tiger

    Bengal_Tiger Regular Member

    Joined:
    Nov 22, 2015
    Messages:
    189
    Likes Received:
    450
    India has to do whatever is in her interests. India has no moral obligation to do anything for Bangladesh in this sort of way in the same way it has no moral obligation to Colombia, Senegal or Mongolia. India should do whatever is best for her. I am merely saying my suggestion is a win-win for both India and BD, and is basically free.
     
    Samar Rathi, TrueSpirit2 and bose like this.
  19. Mad Indian

    Mad Indian Proud Bigot Veteran Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2012
    Messages:
    12,830
    Likes Received:
    7,524
    Location:
    Podigai Hills.
    I can say only one thing- you are putting too much faith on Indian influence over Saudis. Saudi barbarians are not likely to listen to India. I think a better approach will be for your own govt to crush the jamaati scum
     
  20. Bengal_Tiger

    Bengal_Tiger Regular Member

    Joined:
    Nov 22, 2015
    Messages:
    189
    Likes Received:
    450
    War crimes execution: India may back Bangladesh if issue raised at global forum
    By PTI | 24 Nov, 2015, 08.01PM IST
    Post a Comment

    NEW DELHI: India is likely to back Bangladesh if the issue of execution of two influential Opposition leaders for war crimes during the country's 1971 independence struggle against Pakistan was taken to any multilateral or international forum.

    As per government's assessment here, fundamentalist Jamaat-e-Islami has been trying to whip up tension in Bangladesh after hanging of the two leaders and there was no basis to conclude that terror outfit Islamic State was present in that country that country though it is witnessing rising violent acts.

    India was supportive of Bangladesh government's decision to bring to justice to those allegedly involved in war crimes and will throw its weight behind Prime Minister Sheikh Hasina if any country takes the matter to any international forum, sources said.

    On November 22, Bangladesh had executed Jamaat-e-Islami Secretary-General Ali Ahsan Mohammad Mujahid and BNP leader Salahuddin Quader Chowdhury for war crimes during the 1971 war of independence, which had triggered sporadic violence.

    Pakistan was severely critical of Bangladesh for executing the two leaders. Hasina had dismissed Pakistan's criticism as "unacceptable".

    The view here is that Hasina has shown courage in pursuing the cases of war crimes and she is being supported by common people in that country. An International Crimes Tribunal, set up by the Bangladesh government, had convicted Mujahid and Chowdhury and the Supreme Court had upheld their sentences.

    The sources said the assessment here is that home-grown militancy was rising and there were stepped-up efforts to radicalise youths in Bangladesh which are matters of serious concern.

    Bangladesh has witnessed increasing incidents of violence in the last couple of months including deadly shoooting of an Italian aid worker on the streets of Dhaka. A Japanese man was killed last week by gunmen in Rangpur district, raising concerns among the country's foreign community.

    A number of critics of religious militancy were hacked to death in Bangladesh over the past year.

    Though there were reports about IS trying to gain foothold in Bangladesh, the assessment here is that such reports have no basis and it was Jamaat which is stepping up its activities.

    India feels Bangladesh followed the due process of law in punishing those involved in alleged war crimes.

    The assessment is that the strong reaction by Jamaat will not impact movement of people from enclaves on both sides of the Indo-Bangla border as per the land swapping agreement though it is known to have some influence in certain areas.

    The Bangladeshi government has made adequate security arrangement and the entire process of movement of people was likely to be completed by end of this month.


    http://economictimes.indiatimes.com...ised-at-global-forum/articleshow/49910422.cms





    - If the Pakis realise their threat (as per certain PPP politicians) of taking this to international fora then India will back Bangladesh.
     
    TrueSpirit2 likes this.
  21. Bengal_Tiger

    Bengal_Tiger Regular Member

    Joined:
    Nov 22, 2015
    Messages:
    189
    Likes Received:
    450
    Ok, but if India does say something to the Saudis about this. The most the Saudis can say is no. That's all. No harm in trying.
     

Share This Page