AWACS will change Asia's military dynamics

Discussion in 'Indian Air Force' started by A.V., Feb 16, 2009.

  1. A.V.

    A.V. New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2009
    Messages:
    6,503
    Likes Received:
    1,106
    Location:
    Moscow, russia
    Toronto, ON, Canada, — Three weeks ago, an Indian AWACS – airborne warning and control system – plane made its debut over New Delhi. Two more are on order and will arrive in a year’s time. Additional purchases of this top-of-the-line plane in the near future will enhance India’s defensive posture against both China and Pakistan.
    A deal with Israel in 2004 to supply the Phalcon radar, which uses Active Phased Array Electronic Scanning Technology, cost India US$1.1 billion. Russia supplied India with its highly upgraded IL-76TD workhorse planes, which are fitted with powerful PS-90 engines, via Kazakhstan. This aircraft and its engines have been modified for the hot and humid climate of India.

    The above-mentioned acquisition is a force multiplier for the Indian Air Force. AWACS aircraft are able to detect any enemy airborne activity – including when and were enemy planes take off from bases up to 300 kilometers (186 miles) away and the direction in which they are heading – while staying 100 kilometers (62 miles) within its own border.

    Two of these AWACS aircraft patrolling the western front, well within India’s territory, can cover the sensitive Punjab-Rajasthan border. The Phalcon radar, the most sophisticated to date, can also collect surface information about troop movements and missile launches and can listen into highly confidential communications between Pakistan’s frontline units.

    Militarily, surveillance and advance knowledge of enemy activity is ultimately a force multiplier. An earlier version of this plane was used during the Arab-Israeli conflict of 1973. Israelis shot down most of the Syrian and Egyptian planes without losing any to the enemy, using the early version. The United States also used it during the Gulf War to take out Iraqi planes. The remaining Iraqi pilots of MiG-23s and MiG-29s fled to Iran to escape the terror in the sky.

    Israelis and Americans gave this technology the name AWACS because of its long-range capability. Similar technology mounted on a smaller but very capable plane is called AEW&C, for Airborne Early Warning & Control. Since India has a great deal of territory to cover, acquisition of smaller, more flexible planes with mounted surveillance radars makes sense. In this case, the radar and electronics can be homemade. India’s choice of aircraft for its own AEW&C system is Brazil’s Embraer 145 business/regional jet plane.

    The key word here is operational flexibility. Whereas the IL-76 AWACS aircraft requires a lot of area to take off and land, the Embraer can take off and land at smaller airports. This is key to a layered approach to surveillance, including hostile missiles.

    What does India’s hostile neighbor have for aerial surveillance?

    Pakistan does not want India to have the upper hand. Although it has U.S. money handy to match India’s military spending, nobody is selling them the advanced AWACS. So, they have settled for six Swedish SAAB-2000 turbo prop planes with Ericsson surveillance radars. The deal is worth US$1.5 billion.

    They would have preferred U.S. or Israeli phased ray radar but its unavailability changed their choice to SAAB/Ericsson. The latter is equipped with Saab Microwave Systems, Erieye surveillance radar and nine-hour loitering capability. This is as good as what the Swedes can supply, but lacks actual battlefield experience. At best these are comparable to India’s homegrown AEW&C.

    China lost to India when they negotiated the same deal with Israel to buy Phalcons in 2000-2001 as U.S. intervention prevented the technology transfer. The hardware, which could have gone to the Chinese, was switched to India.
     
  2.  
  3. A.V.

    A.V. New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2009
    Messages:
    6,503
    Likes Received:
    1,106
    Location:
    Moscow, russia
    Like India in the late nineties, China began experimenting with home built AWACS. Initially they turned to Russia and purchased Beriev A-50 radar planes. These are exact copies of the U.S. E-3 Sentry radar planes except that they were mounted on Russian Il-76 aircrafts. Totally dissatisfied, they began experimenting with their own phased ray radar. Their experimental AWACS crashed in 2006, killing forty of their best scientists and technicians. China wants to dump it in favor of Boeing 737-800 planes.

    The Boeing plane with homemade Chinese radars is dubbed as KJ-2000. Equipped by the most modern technology, which China can lay its hands on, three such planes are being built. The KJ-2000’s radar has a range of about 300 kilometers. It is the nearest match to what the U.S. flies in and around Taiwan. Although the Chinese are happy with their decision, improvements are a long way off in the absence of relevant technology, which it has not yet received.

    Realizing that India is ahead in this force multiplier acquisition and nobody else is able to supply them, Pakistan has been making attempts to convince the Chinese to acquire similar planes on their behalf for an undisclosed sum.

    Last year the Chinese KJ-2000 was seen at Pakistan’s Chakalala airport giving an operational demonstration. China is very keen to secure a deal with Pakistan on these aircrafts, as it will help them defray their huge developmental costs.

    The intimidation factor of AWACS is immense. Imagine Pakistan planning a major air raid in India over Srinagar, Kashmir and poised to fly super secret missions from its airports in Rawalpindi, Sialkote, and Sargodha, which are about 200 kilometers from the Indian border. The success of such missions depend on the element of surprise they achieve and an Indian AWACS flying a surveillance mission in a wide arc over Kashmir, Punjab and the Ladakh region can detect Pakistan’s aerial movements and ambush it.

    Concurrently, the Swedish made Pakistani AEW&C and possibly Chinese AWACS can also detect India’s movements. Realizing that the mission is doomed Pakistan’s high command could call off the raids. So, AWACS can avoid an ugly aerial fight.

    AWACS and AEW&C planes are not invulnerable. They fly 200-300 kilometers away from the hostile war zones. A concerted effort from enemy fighters could force it to retreat far beyond its 300-kilometer safe distance. As a turbo-prop heavy lift plane is very vulnerable to Beyond-Visual-Range attacks, it needs an escort of fighters to ward off such threats.

    Imagine a Chinese air attack on central Indian air bases in the wake of their ground losses in India’s Ladakh region or their inability to capture Twang in the Indian state of Arunachal Pradesh. They could send their SU-27’s over the Himalayas from bases far away or send cruise missiles from bases closer to the Tibet-India border. The early knowledge of incoming planes or missiles will help India in beating back the air attack and saving its air assets. Without the early warnings from AWACS, Indian airbases are very vulnerable to enemy attacks. So, AWACS is a big asset.

    At sea, India’s recent contract with Boeing for six, P-8I, long-range reconnaissance planes will greatly enhance India’s sea reconnaissance capability. These planes will be data linked with other air surveillance planes, surface ships and space based assets. This US$2.1 billion purchase together with AWACS and AEW&C are designed to warn hostile forces to stay as far away from Indian interests as possible.

    Still, all the forgoing is an enhanced defensive posture of India. It will soon be enhanced with locally developed and externally purchased fighter jets, which will take the fight to the enemy.

    The shape of India’s armed forces, which was dull and dreary for the last fifty years, is about to be modernized with an offensive punch in next 5 to 10 years.

    --

    (Hari Sud is a retired vice president of C-I-L Inc., a former investment strategies analyst and international relations manager. A graduate of Punjab University and the University of Missouri, he has lived in Canada for the past 34 years. ©Copyright Hari Sud.)

    AWACS will change Asia's military dynamics - upiasia.com
     
  4. screwterrorists

    screwterrorists Founding Member

    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2009
    Messages:
    76
    Likes Received:
    0
    hey
    general question for everyone. i recently came across a peice of news which said first Phalcon will be delivered on march 2009....i thought the first one was delivered a couple of weeks ago?
     
  5. sagar

    sagar Regular Member

    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2009
    Messages:
    44
    Likes Received:
    5
    PHALCON AWACS Delivery Schedule for March 2009 | India Defence

    PHALCON AWACS Delivery Schedule for March 2009




    Dated 15/2/2009
    Printer Friendly Subscribe
    IAF will now have to wait till March end for Israeli airborne early warning system, whose induction has already been delayed by 16 months, DDI News reported on Friday.

    "The Israeli PHALCON airborne early warning and control system (AWACS), which will provide the IAF an eye in the skies to perform surveillance and reconnaissance roles, will arrive in India only by March end," a senior IAF officer said in New Delhi on Friday.

    The AWACS mounted on Russian-made IL-76 heavy lift transport aircraft was originally scheduled to be delivered by the Israel Aerospace Industries by November 2007, but could not meet the deadline.

    AWACS, a major force multiplier for the Air Force, can provide advance information even as an enemy fighter jet takes off from enemy territory, giving enough time for the IAF to scramble its own fighter jets to counter the enemy aircraft.

    It is also an important link in the IAF's plans to go network centric by establishing an advanced Integrated Air Command and Control System (IACCS) through the Air Force Net (AFNET) communication network.

    "With IAF rapidly progressing with its network centricity plans, AWACS will be an important element...the air link...in the IACCS," the officer said.

    The AWACS will link the IAF's ground and air-based weapon platforms and communication system, which would be vital for IAF's network-centric operations.

    With IAF aiming to become a network-centric force by 2010-11, it has been trying to inter-link its land, air and space assets and platforms to provide real-time information for increasing its situational awareness during conflicts.

    Under the AFNET project, the IAF has already linked about 70 percent of its land-based assets and platforms to the IACCS, the officer said.

    India had in March 2004 signed an USD 1.1 billion deal with Israel for three AWACS fitted on IL-76 platforms that would help IAF detect incoming hostile cruise missiles and unmanned aerial vehicles much before ground-based radars track the rogue flying machines.

    IAF's Agra air base has geared up to receive the first AWACS and has got its infrastructure improved by extending the runway, establishing an avionics lab, and integrating ground systems for future operations.
     
  6. nitesh

    nitesh Mob Control Manager Stars and Ambassadors

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2009
    Messages:
    7,541
    Likes Received:
    1,260
    Location:
    Bangalore
    There were news that it has been delivered ahead of schedule as the original date was march 2009 only. So let the march come and then see:)
     
  7. LETHALFORCE

    LETHALFORCE Moderator Moderator

    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2009
    Messages:
    20,543
    Likes Received:
    6,547
    India's first Phalcon AWACS system arrives ahead of schedule

    domain-b.com : India's first Phalcon AWACS system arrives ahead of schedule




    India's first Phalcon AWACS system arrives ahead of schedule news
    15 January 2009




    New Delhi: Israel has dispatched the first of the three Phalcon Airborne Warning and Control System (AWACS) aircraft to India ahead of a reworked delivery schedule. Reports suggest the aircraft arrived at New Delhi's Palam airport on 11 January 2009 from where it has now moved to the Indian Air Force's base at Agra.

    The surprise development takes place even as relations between India and Pakistan continue to deteriorate post-Mumbai terror attacks. According to the re-worked delivery schedule the first Phalcon was to arrive only in February 2009.

    Image: Beriev.comUnder a $1.1 billion deal signed in March 2004, Israel was contracted to supply three Phalcon airborne warning and control systems. These systems were to be mated with Ilyushin-76 heavy military transport aircraft. The deliveries were originally intended to commence in November 2007, but were subsequently postponed to the end of 2008 and further to February 2009.

    According to the revised delivery schedule, the first aircraft was to be delivered in February 2009 with the second and third ones now expected in September 2009 and April 2010.

    Reports emerging in early November 2008 suggested that India may have contracted for a fourth Il-76 mounted Phalcon AWACS system from Israel. It is said to be keen on building up its Phalcon AWACS fleet to a strength of six.

    The Israeli Phalcon AWACS will enable the IAF to carry out tactical surveillance over a radius of 400 kilometers and collect surface target information deep inside Pakistan even as the aircraft operates within Indian airspace.

    An electronically steered beam emitting from a solid-state phased array Elta EL/M-2075 radar, mounted on a radome above the fuselage, provides a 360 degree coverage around the aircraft.

    It is also being suggested that the AWACS will eventually be networked with other air force assets through a dedicated satellite.

    India has an indigenous AWACS programme being developed by the Defence Research and Development Organisation (DRDO), which signed a deal last year with Brazilian aircraft manufacturer Embraer for the purchase of three EMB-145 aircraft for use as an AWACS platform.

    These aircraft will be modified to carry an Active Array Antenna Unit, developed by the DRDO, on their fuselage.

    {Image: Beriev.comLast month Pakistan announced a $278 million deal with the People's Republic of China for the purchase of a modern Airborne Warning and Control System (AWACS).

    The Chinese AWACS system has been under development since 2004, sometime after the Americans stopped the Israeli government from selling the Phalcon system to Beijing.

    According to details provided to Pakistani legislators China will provide the system to Pakistan over the next four years. The PRC has also made a critical concession to cash-strapped Pakistan agreeing to make deliveries on a deferred payment basis.

    For India, its tactical surveillance responsibilities are currently being shouldered by a fleet of Israeli-made Searcher and Heron UAVs.
     
  8. LETHALFORCE

    LETHALFORCE Moderator Moderator

    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2009
    Messages:
    20,543
    Likes Received:
    6,547
    Articles #1347 , The Value of the Phalcon AWACS for India

    The Value of the Phalcon AWACS for India
    Prashant Dikshit
    Deputy Director, IPCS

    The long awaited AWACS (Air Borne Warning and Control Systems) is eventually being inducted in the Indian Air Force. Israeli Phalcon Radar is being integrated on the Russian IL-76 A-50 Beriev Transport jets under Indian supervision and the software programmes are being written by Indian specialists. The Indian endeavour in obtaining this vigorously pursued and revolutionary augmentation to country’s air defence network has not been without loss of resources, lives and a period of two decades when it comes to fruition hopefully in 2005. An indigenous and ambitious project of the Defence Research and Development Organisation (DRDO) on Airborne Surveillance Warning and Control Systems (ASWAC) in the past was halted by the government when in 1999 the “experimental system” crashed in the mother AVRO aircraft in the hills of Tamil Nadu. The accident was caused by the rotodome shearing off and hitting the tail of the aircraft. The IAF then tested the Russian AE-50 system, a variant of the IL-76 aircraft and found it unsatisfactory. The Israeli option seemingly coincided with the cancellation, under strident opposition from US government, of an identical and highly advanced, joint Chinese-Israeli development programme. The Indian programme survived a similar opposition from US largely due to a favourable tilt in the American stance and Israeli lobbying.



    A critical appraisal of this acquisition must be done in the light of the foremost requirement of an Air Defence Network. Its purpose is to provide an adequate early warning of the airborne hostile intruder so that a timely interception can be undertaken before it penetrates airspace sought to be brought under control. And in the conduct of defensive counter air operations the ultimate goal would be to suppress all opposition in the designated airspace. During peace time and in advancing battle zones the requirements remain same. In the Indian context the extent of this warning is restricted for low flying vehicles operating below Radar cover due to the inherent limitation of a ground based system not able to detect up to desired ranges. The benefits of the “Over the Horizon Radar” accrue to the Phalcon AWACS, by operating at about 30,000 feet and thus being able to monitor low level activity in the air space up to ranges of 500 km. On India’s western borders, such surveillance over sea will yield optimum results in reporting both air and sea activity. Over land, advantages of detection ranges may have to be marginally forsaken to protect the AWACS aircraft against SAMS but ranges of 400 km are possible with tactical routing. Formidable gains in detection ranges are most likely across the Himalayan Ranges on the northern borders where Radar Units could not be located due to an inhospitable terrain.



    An AWACS is a control centre which can track 100 targets and intercept at least half of them simultaneously with aircraft and SAMS; each engagement closely monitored and reported in real time. The sobriquet “Force multiplier” justifies as economies of effort and resources are nearly quadrupled. The operations are supported by onboard ECM (electronic counter measures) and ECCM (electronic counter counter measures) systems for electronic warfare. Passive Comint and Elint devices record data up to1000 km and “data link” to ground stations. Although an ESM package is incorporated for self protection, this expensive and crucially important platform should not be operated without suitable fighter protection especially in a hostile environment.



    The AWACS’ ability to deal with threats from missiles must be seen within the context of the composite mother network. The Phalcon radar is designed to scan from ground level to about 40,000 feet and all moving objects in this envelope of air space are detectable except for objects returning a smaller radar cross section. A low flying cruise missile for example has a radar cross section of about .005 metre at a range of 200 km and may thus reduce the extent of early warning and logically the US is upgrading its space assets to detect such intrusion. In cases of high trajectory incoming ICBM/ IRBM, other ground based radars would have detected the missiles well before they start painting on the Phalcon Radar. A separate project on the installation of the “Big Pine” Radar system is already on the anvil for detecting missile threats. This acquisition is being seen as the forerunner to the futuristic systems for the active missile defences in the Indian air space which are currently absent.



    The selection of the IL-76 aircraft as the airborne platform for the Radar is an appropriate choice as the Indian Air Force possesses adequate experience and infrastructure to operate the aircraft. The advanced technology dispenses with the rotating Radar. However, with the induction limited to only three systems for an equal number of aircraft, the schedules of AWACS operations will have to be limited to and kept focused for developing hostile scenarios only.
     
  9. nitesh

    nitesh Mob Control Manager Stars and Ambassadors

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2009
    Messages:
    7,541
    Likes Received:
    1,260
    Location:
    Bangalore
    Delay?

    http://www.hindu.com/2009/03/02/stories/2009030259591600.htm

    First Phalcon radar system to arrive in May

    Ravi Sharma

    It was ordered in March 2004

    It will provide IAF with intelligence inputs

    Second Phalcon will arrive in late 2009; the third in 2010

    BANGALORE: The first of the three Israeli-manufactured Phalcon Airborne Early Warning and Control (AEW&C) radar systems that have been ordered by the Indian Air Force (IAF) will arrive in India only in May, 18 months behind schedule.

    The IAF will shortly depute an ‘Acceptance Team’ that will go to Israel to receive the first Phalcon Airborne Early Warning (AEW) suite that has been mounted on a radome above the fuselage of a Russian-built Il-76 heavy lift transport aircraft.

    Tactical surveillance

    Ordered in March 2004 at a cost of $1.1billion, the three ‘eye in the sky’ airborne radar systems will provide the IAF with intelligence inputs, helping it to maintain air superiority, improve strike capabilities and conduct tactical surveillance over a radius of 400 km.

    Confirming the impending arrival, officials from the Israeli Aircraft Industries (IAI) and Elta Systems — the two Israeli firms that have collaborated in the manufacture of the Phalcon radar system and its mating on the Il-76 — told The Hindu during the recent Aero India 2009 air show that the second Phalcon would arrive in late 2009 while the third would arrive by mid 2010.

    Sources, however, said the project, which saw collaborative efforts from a range of nations and companies, ran into trouble during the integration of the plethora of European and Israeli origin systems, most notably the long-range, high-powered transmit/receive (T/R) modules, on the Russian platform.


    One of the world’s most advanced airborne surveillance systems, the Phalcon’s Active Electronically Scanned Array Radar, permits 360 degree coverage, “tracking high manoeuvring targets and low-flying objects hundreds of kilometres away, under all weather conditions, in both day and night.”

    The IAF, which is looking to order three more Phalcons, is planning to network them with other air and ground assets through data link and eventually the planned dedicated Air Force satellite that is to be launched by mid-2010. The Phalcons will be based at Air Force Station Agra.

    Presently, the only platforms offering such capabilities in India in a limited way are the spy planes of the Research and Analysis Wing’s Aviation Research Centre and the IAF’s limited fleet of Israeli-built Heron and Searcher-II drones.
     
  10. nitesh

    nitesh Mob Control Manager Stars and Ambassadors

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2009
    Messages:
    7,541
    Likes Received:
    1,260
    Location:
    Bangalore
    India to get Phalcon AWACS on May 18 - India - The Times of India

    India to get Phalcon AWACS on May 18
    23 Apr 2009, 1623 hrs IST, PTI


    JERUSALEM: India will get its first 'eye in the sky', the Phalcon Airborne Warning and Control Systems (AWACS), aircraft on May 18, which will provide the IAF means to track incoming missiles and look deep into the neighbouring countries without violating any air space.

    The first Phalcon was inspected by top Indian Defence officials who came here to check the specially modified Russian IL-76 aircraft and set May 18 as the delivery date.

    "The other two aircraft would be delivered by Mid or late 2010, if everything goes on schedule," Defence sources said here today.

    The delivery of the aircraft bought at a whopping price of $1.1 billion is almost a year and a half behind schedule. As per the tripartite deal between India, Russia and Israel, the aircraft should have been delivered by the end of March this year.

    India and Israel are reported to be in advanced negotiations for the purchase of three more Phalcon AWACS, which the IAF proposes to integrate with other air and ground assets.

    All the six AWACS would be linked with the country's first military satellite proposed to be launched by mid next year.
     
  11. LETHALFORCE

    LETHALFORCE Moderator Moderator

    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2009
    Messages:
    20,543
    Likes Received:
    6,547
    After long wait, IAF to get first Phalcon AWACS on May 20 - India - The Times of India


    After long wait, IAF to get first Phalcon AWACS on May 20
    8 May 2009, 0225 hrs IST, TNN

    NEW DELHI: The long wait is finally over. IAF will get its most potent force-multiplier in the shape of the Phalcon AWACS (airborne warning and

    control systems), or "the eye in the sky'', from Israel on May 20.

    IAF chief Air Chief Marshal F H Major on Thursday confirmed that the first of the three Phalcon AWACS, under the $1.1-billion deal signed in March 2004, will be landing in India in the third week of this month, as was earlier reported by TOI.

    The Phalcon AWACS will bolster IAF's capabilities to detect and track troop build-ups or aircraft movements deep inside Pakistan, much further than ground-based radars, while flying well within Indian airspace.

    AWACS are primarily used for detection of incoming hostile cruise missiles and aircraft from hundreds of km away in all-weather conditions as well as directing air defence fighters during combat operations against enemy jets.

    "Phalcon AWACS, for instance, will be able to detect a two square metre target from over 200 km away. Bigger targets can be spotted from 400 to 500 km away. They will be based at the Agra airbase,'' said a senior officer.

    Under the March 2004 deal, the first AWACS was to be delivered to India in December 2007, the second in September 2008 and the third in March 2009. But the complex integration work of mounting the Israeli Phalcon early-warning radar and communication suite on Russian heavy-lift IL-76 military aircraft, under a tripartite agreement among India, Israel and Russia, led to the long delay.

    "The other two AWACS should reach India sometime next year. We have been awaiting them for quite some time now, having already exercised with the US and French air forces to get a feel of AWACS. Our teams have also been to Israel to get properly trained,'' said another officer.

    Incidentally, IAF and Navy are also on course to induct nine more Israeli Aerostat radars as a "follow-on'' order to the two such EL/M-2083 radars procured in 2004-2005 for $145 million.

    Aerostat radars, basically sensors mounted to blimp-like large balloons tethered to the ground, and AWACS together will go a long way in boosting air defence capabilities, making the country's airspace much more impregnable.

    India, too, is pursuing a mini-AWACS project indigenously. Under this, the indigenous AEW&C systems developed by DRDO will be mounted on three Embraer-145 jets, being obtained from Brazil for $210 million. The Rs 1,800-crore project, however, is running quite late and the first flight-testing of the AEW&C plane is unlikely to take place as scheduled in 2012.
     
  12. nitesh

    nitesh Mob Control Manager Stars and Ambassadors

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2009
    Messages:
    7,541
    Likes Received:
    1,260
    Location:
    Bangalore
    The Telegraph - Calcutta (Kolkata) | Northeast | Air chief for security boost


    After long wait, IAF to get first Phalcon AWACS on May 20 - India - The Times of India

     
  13. nitesh

    nitesh Mob Control Manager Stars and Ambassadors

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2009
    Messages:
    7,541
    Likes Received:
    1,260
    Location:
    Bangalore
    cross posting:

    AFP: India to get early warning radar system

    Now this is interesting or pure DDM

     
  14. Yusuf

    Yusuf GUARDIAN Administrator

    Joined:
    Mar 24, 2009
    Messages:
    24,274
    Likes Received:
    11,283
    Location:
    BANGalore
    I dont know from where they got the figure from the range. Tried to look up but could not get the numbers even from Israeli sites.
     
  15. Yusuf

    Yusuf GUARDIAN Administrator

    Joined:
    Mar 24, 2009
    Messages:
    24,274
    Likes Received:
    11,283
    Location:
    BANGalore
    I gathered the E-2D has a range greater than 400 miles and can track 2000 targets simultaneously and detect 20,000 targets.

    So a detection range of 500 miles is realistic.
     
  16. kuku

    kuku Respected Member

    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2009
    Messages:
    507
    Likes Received:
    2
    I do not think anyone has released data on the size and performance of the A-ESA on the plane, so its all guess work.

    The standard figures of EL/M-2075 are not applicable as this is somewhat a customised platform.
     
  17. chandrahass

    chandrahass Defence Professionals Defence Professionals

    Joined:
    Apr 21, 2009
    Messages:
    56
    Likes Received:
    2
    We were to Get Phalcon today . any upadates
     
  18. Vinod2070

    Vinod2070 मध्यस्थ Stars and Ambassadors

    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2009
    Messages:
    2,553
    Likes Received:
    100
    Saw the following on another forum. SHows another side of Awacs!

    A good read. I would highly recommend to read in full.

    Continued..
     
  19. Vinod2070

    Vinod2070 मध्यस्थ Stars and Ambassadors

    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2009
    Messages:
    2,553
    Likes Received:
    100
    Even though this person may be smug about what he is sure of and reflects the cheap Pakistani belief that their air force is somehow superior (after losing every war!), I think he raises some important points.

    I am sure these issues will be taken into account while we operate these new toys.
     
  20. nitesh

    nitesh Mob Control Manager Stars and Ambassadors

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2009
    Messages:
    7,541
    Likes Received:
    1,260
    Location:
    Bangalore
  21. jackprince

    jackprince Turning into a frog Senior Member

    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2009
    Messages:
    2,536
    Likes Received:
    2,674
    Location:
    Seema Andhra
    A Layman's Opinion:

    The man might know his stuff, but even then this article of his self-serving. He completely ignored the 'control' part of the AWACS! An AWACS is force multiplier not for having only a better radar or loitering time, but for being able to see wider battle scenario and controlling the flights accordingly, who knows in future they might be able to supply mid-flight target update to BVRAAMs launched by fighters thus freeing them to engage another target. AWACS would certainly relieve a fighter pilot from worrying about complete battle scenario.

    Also, Indian resources may not be great but it is also not as little as he stated too. It would be particularly vast compared to Pakistan. We are getting our own military production line on-line gradually; and many of the instruments are being made under license production or indigenous. So if a war breaks Pakistan may run out of weapons and parts, India still will have a quite good support structure to speed up production. Indian economy is strong enough to support IAF and it is getting better each day, when Pak's is falling apart. China could may be exhaust Indian resources, Pak can only dream of.

    Pakistan air force will have to expend its own resources too for keeping up the faints and false alarm rate - granted that may be less compared to Indian efforts in response to them, but Pakistan also has much less resources than India too. And who says India wouldn't start replying them in kind? In which case Pak resources will expend in lot faster than India too.

    He also seemed to have forgotten that we are enemy countries, so it's our moral duty to keep each other on edge. :wink: So even if their wouldn't be an AWACS, the same feints and false alarms would be caused regardless. Only with AWACS we will have a minutes early warning and preparation time if there is a real hostilities, which is very much likely in not so far future.

    He also seemed to mourn the time of glorious idleness when threat-alert was few due to tech. disadvantages. But he seemed to have forgotten that it is air forces duty and responsibility to stay ready and alert to respond to possible threat. Particularly in case of Air Force not doing proper modernization of the force and tech. is liability, which in turn most likely to turn in burnt planes.
     

Share This Page