Army Tramples on Faulty DRDO Study on Siachen Deployment

Discussion in 'Defence & Strategic Issues' started by rajkumar singh, Nov 3, 2014.

  1. rajkumar singh

    rajkumar singh Regular Member

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    A study by Defence Research and Development Organisation, India’s premier defence research institute, to find solutions and shorten the acclimatization period has been junked by the Army.-

    Keeping unforeseen events in mind, the Army wanted to reduce the pre-acclimatisation training period to faster deploy its troops to high-altitude locations in cases of emergency.-

    And for this, the DRDO was mandated to carry out a study -on how to reduce the pre-acclimatisation -training period in May 2009 with budget of over `3 crore. Delhi-based Defence Institute of Physiology and Allied Sciences (DIPAS), a wing of DRDO, carried out the study for which they selected 210 soldiers.-
    In order to study the soldiers’ physiology changes, they were asked to stay in a make-shift chamber filled with nitrogen for intermittent periods. But the Army has rubbished the study report and criticised the methods adopted by the DIPAS scientists.

    In a strongly worded -four-page letter to DIPAS on 10 September, the office of the Director General Armed Forces Medical Services (DGAFMS) has raised serious objections and sought explanation on various key points related to the study including selection of troops for the study, use of multiple investigators to collect data, use of master step test as an indicator of exercise performance for high altitude and disparity in heart rate date from the same cohort at different points of the report.

    When contacted, DRDO spokesperson Ravi Gupta refused to comment as it is a classified matter.

    Army Tramples on Faulty DRDO Study on Siachen Deployment - The New Indian Express
    Army Tramples on Faulty DRDO Study on Siachen Deployment - The New Indian Express
     
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  3. sorcerer

    sorcerer Senior Member Senior Member

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    Bleeding in Siachen: Pakistan Losing 30 Soldiers a Year on Highest Battlefield


    In a rare revelation, Pakistan has officially come out with details of the battle casualties it suffered in various operations from 2003-10. This include deployments on the Indian border as well as its fight against militants on the Afghan border. One figure that stands out in this period - which coincides with a ceasefire agreement that meant no firing on the border - is that the Pakistan Army has been suffering huge fatal casualties on the Siachen glacier, the highest battlefield in the world without a shot being fired.



    Despite a ceasefire that has seen no targeted firing since a 2003 agreement, the Pakistan Army has been losing an average of 30 soldiers a year on Siachen. The deaths are associated with the perils of deployment at high altitude - medical complications, avalanches, bad weather and more. With a total of 213 deaths recorded at Siachen between 2003-10, the glacier has been taking its toll. The average of 30 deaths a year does not include the 140 soldiers that Pakistan lost in a fatal avalanche that hit a military camp in April 2012.


    On the other hand, Indian casualties on glacier have progressively decreased over the years and are currently in single digits. Official data released in parliament shows that Indian soldiers have died due to climatic conditions at an average of 10 a year. In recent years this number has almost come down to single digits, with 5 soldiers lost this year, six in 2014 and ten in 2013. This despite the fact that the Indian Army is manning higher posts and is deployed across the length and breadth of the glacier, unlike Pakistan that is restricted to the mountains surrounding the area. In both 2007 and 2008 for example, the Indian army suffered four fatal casualties. Correspondingly, the Pakistan Army lost 13 in 2008 and 12 in 2007 in the Siachen region.


    The difference in casualties between the two nations is attributed by the Army on better equipment, resources, training and medical facilities on the Indian side. Indian Army officers who have served on the glacier say that a strictly followed acclimatization procedure, along with standard operating procedures that are implemented sternly have brought down casualties. The laying down of a kerosene line on the glacier, as well as the procurement of pre fabricated huts and better clothing has reduced deaths due to the bone chilling cold. Lt Gen Ata Hasnain (retd), says that one of the success stories of DRDO has been on high altitude research and the medicine and material they have put together for the glacier is saving lives.

    http://economictimes.indiatimes.com...field/articleshow/49012146.cms?cfmid=11001098
     
    punjab47 and Yumdoot like this.
  4. Mikesingh

    Mikesingh Senior Member Senior Member

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  5. sorcerer

    sorcerer Senior Member Senior Member

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    ^^
    May be we gotta do a lot more than that!!
     

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