Armed vessels worry navy

Discussion in 'Indian Navy' started by Ray, Dec 4, 2013.

  1. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

    Joined:
    Apr 17, 2009
    Messages:
    43,117
    Likes Received:
    23,545
    Location:
    Somewhere
    Armed vessels worry navy

    New Delhi, Dec. 3: Merchant vessels carrying weapons and combatants in the seas around India pose threats similar to the 26/11 attacks in Mumbai, the navy has warned.

    Calling such vessels “floating armouries”, navy chief Admiral D.K. Joshi today said that many such ships were “entirely unregulated.… This has very serious security implications for us including the infiltration of terrorists”.

    Ostensibly, these ships and combatants escort merchant vessels for counter-piracy actions. But the intentions are not always stated.

    Pointing to the confiscation of the MV Seaman Guard Ohio — a US-owned but Sierra Leone-flagged ship — off Tuticorin, Tamil Nadu, earlier this year, the navy chief made a case for a coastal security law that would bring the state governments within the security grid operated by the navy. The vessel had 25 armed guards of four different nationalities.

    “There are close to 140 private security companies operating in North Indian Ocean, which hire... armed security personnel,” he said.

    “These personnel shift between vessels at sea, without entering any port or coastal state-regulated maritime territory. There are scores of ships operating as floating armouries outside any coastal state jurisdiction.

    “Lack of any provisions to deal with such vessels or armed personnel hampers legal actions. We have recommended that this necessitates formulation of a regulatory framework by the International Maritime Organisation.”

    Joshi added: “If there are unregulated arms and ammunition on a vessel, the existence of the weapons is not known as also where the guards are transferring them, and this could lead to such a situation (the Mumbai attacks) on anybody’s soil.”

    Armed vessels worry navy

    ***************************************************************

    Given the piracy that is rampant in the waters around Somalia and near Philippines, there is a genuine requirement to have armed naval hired guns patrolling for the safety of the vessels that shipping companies pay for.

    The national navies do not provide individual protection nor are merchant vessels permitted to carry weapons, and in any case, owing to computerisation, the crew on board these days, are minimal.

    Yet, on the other hand, these armed vessels could also be used for arms smuggling to equip insurgents, terrorist and anti socials.

    In Fact, what was the US ship registered in Sierra Leone, doing in Indian waters and not providing legitimate documentation, remains a mystery!
     
    Kunal Biswas likes this.
  2.  
  3. lookieloo

    lookieloo Regular Member

    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2013
    Messages:
    463
    Likes Received:
    248
    Location:
    US
    1. Sierra Leone is a common flag-of-convenience for private vessels.
    2. Pirate attacks have taken place quite close to India and said waters are probably a good place to pick up a security detail.
    3. That such a ship failed to pass India's inane/capricious bureaucratic-documentation standards is hardly surprising.

    If you don't want armed mercs off your cost, go do something about the damned pirates.
     
  4. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

    Joined:
    Apr 17, 2009
    Messages:
    43,117
    Likes Received:
    23,545
    Location:
    Somewhere
    Each country has its rules.

    It always look capricious to the others.

    Do as the Romans do, or stay at home!

    No one can do much about pirates.


    _____________________

    Iran accuses Gulf States of supporting Somali piracy

    The state-run Fars News Agency quoted General Mohammad Nazzeri, of Iran’s navy as claiming, “the pirates of the Gulf of Aden are simple fishers but their sponsors and main leaders are Sheikhs of the United Arab Emirates, Yemen and Saudi Arabia. They provide the Somalis with money, weapons and equipment.”

    The claim seemed strange to Jay Bahadur, author of the book The Pirates of Somalia, who said, “what reason would these littoral Arab states have for sabotaging shipping going through their backyard?”

    While the three accused states might not have serious interests in combating piracy, they may host elements that collude with the Somali pirates, those familiar with Somali piracy said.

    “’Supporting’ is probably too strong a word. Connections and involvement by citizens of those countries? Yes,” said Peter Eichstaedt, a journalist who has lived and worked in east Africa. “I spoke with pirates and former pirates, and others have documented this as well, who say that Dubai acts as a hub for much of the pirate financial activity. Ransom money is moved in and out of Dubai. Once pirates collect their ransom, fleets of Toyota Land Cruisers are purchased in Dubai, along with other sorts of high-demand items.”


    Yemen, said Eichstaedt, may play a contributing role because of its proximity. He says said because of its location across the Gulf of Aden from Somalia, Yemen ends up hosting a lot of clandestine activity. Yemen is also facing acute degradation to its state institutions, which could further incentivise those who operate outside the law to use it as a base.

    However, there seems to be no evidence that Yemen formally supports piracy. “Saudi connections are hard to pinpoint,” said Eichstaedt. “Saudi extremists may be supporting the Al Shabab fundamentalist fighters in southern Somalia. The Saudi connections could involve Somalia pirates used to transport weapons and personnel into and out of Somali to support the Al Shabab cause.

    “The UAE has invested more than most in combating piracy,” said Bahadur.

    Last month, Dubai hosted a conference titled “A Regional Response to Maritime Piracy: Enhancing Public-Private Partnerships and Strengthening Global Engagement.” As part of the conference, naval staff member Ibrahim Al-Musharrakh outlined two Gulf approaches to proactively combat piracy.
    Al-Musharrakh pointed out that in addition to diplomatic efforts such as the conference, the Emirates have contributed money and resources to the cause, as well as raiding a pirate-controlled ship in 2011. He recommends the formation of a Gulf Cooperation Council anti-piracy military force that would patrol the waters around the region.

    The Iranian accusations came United Nations report on Somalia was leaked recently, claiming pirates were being shielded from prosecution by a number of high-level Somali officials.

    The report specifically cited President Sharif Sheikh Ahmed, who heads the Transitional Federal Government, as being a party to the protection of pirates.

    The report notes with 237 incidents, 2011 saw the highest-ever level of Somali pirate activity. The report also stated that piracy, specifically in the Gulf of Aden, has steadily decreased.
    However, piracy in the Gulf of Aden continues to capture the world’s attention because it occurs in a pivotal energy thoroughfare that connects the Arabian Sea to the Red Sea and Suez Canal.
    SOURCE: Daily News Egypt

    Iran accuses Gulf States of supporting Somali piracy - SaveOurSeafarers

    _________________________________


    There are many interests involved to ensure that the pirates survive!

    Political and financials.

    And Big Powers are also involved.

    Big business!
     
    Last edited: Dec 4, 2013
    Kunal Biswas likes this.
  5. W.G.Ewald

    W.G.Ewald Defence Professionals/ DFI member of 2 Defence Professionals

    Joined:
    Sep 28, 2011
    Messages:
    14,140
    Likes Received:
    8,528
    Location:
    North Carolina, USA
    Piracy: Privateers | The Economist
     
  6. Kunal Biswas

    Kunal Biswas Member of the Year 2011 Moderator

    Joined:
    May 26, 2010
    Messages:
    27,613
    Likes Received:
    28,428
    Location:
    BHARAT, INDIA, HINDUSTHAN
    Indian Coast guards are working around these waters so does Indian navy warships ..

    Must formulate some laws which prohibits such vessels inside Indian waters ..

    To deal with outlaw armed mercenary vessels there must be heavily armed IN ships and helicopters on stand by ..
     
  7. TrueSpirit1

    TrueSpirit1 The Nobody Banned

    Joined:
    Nov 5, 2013
    Messages:
    1,575
    Likes Received:
    1,014
    Location:
    India
    Sir, can you throw some light on this ?
     
  8. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

    Joined:
    Apr 17, 2009
    Messages:
    43,117
    Likes Received:
    23,545
    Location:
    Somewhere
    Kunal Biswas and W.G.Ewald like this.
  9. W.G.Ewald

    W.G.Ewald Defence Professionals/ DFI member of 2 Defence Professionals

    Joined:
    Sep 28, 2011
    Messages:
    14,140
    Likes Received:
    8,528
    Location:
    North Carolina, USA

    Such persons are an affront to the memory of Edward Teach of Bath, North Carolina, our own Blackbeard.

    NC Historic Sites - Historic Bath - Blackbeard the Pirate
     
    Ray likes this.

Share This Page