Are Russian Forces operating along with USA in AF-PAK region?

Discussion in 'Europe and Russia' started by ajtr, Oct 29, 2010.

  1. ajtr

    ajtr Veteran Member Veteran Member

    Joined:
    Oct 2, 2009
    Messages:
    12,038
    Likes Received:
    715
    Russia, US conduct joint Afghan drug raid

    Russia and the United States destroyed four drug laboratories in their first joint anti-drug operation in Afghanistan, Russia's top drug control official has revealed.

    Viktor Ivanov said the unprecedented joint operation hit four laboratories near the border with Pakistan, caused up to $1 billion in damage to the wider drug trade
    Mr Ivanov says they seized up to 200 million doses of heroin.
    Leaders of the Cold War enemies believe cooperation in Afghanistan can expand as both countries concentrate on terrorism and drug exports.
    So far it has mostly been limited to Russia providing its territory for U.S. military transit.
    The raid destroyed three heroin labs and one morphine lab, which were located about three miles from the Pakistan border at an important drug trafficking crossroads, Ivanov said.
    Russia frequently slams what it describes as slack anti-drug policies of US and NATO forces in Afghanistan, leading to an increased flow of drugs into Russia via Central Asian countries.
    Mr Ivanov travelled to Washington last week to discuss co-operation in fighting drug trafficking and accused the United States of failing to destroy heroin laboratories and crack down on poppy-growing land owners.
    Russian drug control authorities have estimated that 30,000 Russians died in 2009 as a result of using heroin from Afghanistan, and a million have died over the last decade.
     
    Last edited: Oct 29, 2010
  2.  
  3. ajtr

    ajtr Veteran Member Veteran Member

    Joined:
    Oct 2, 2009
    Messages:
    12,038
    Likes Received:
    715
    Russia and Nato plan joint initiative in Afghanistan

    Russian forces could return to Afghanistan for the first time since they were forced out by mujahideen fighters in 1989, under a joint initiative with Nato.

    A Nato summit next month will be attended by Russia's president, Dmitry Medvedev, to discuss the plans. Nato officials said Russia had agreed to sell helicopters to Afghanistan and provide training.
    Moscow will allow Nato forces to withdraw equipment from Afghanistan overland for the first time, in proposals expected to be agreed in Lisbon."The summit can mark a new start in the relationship between Nato and Russia," said Anders Fogh Rasmussen, the Nato secretary-general.
    "We will hopefully agree on a broad range of areas in which we can develop practical co-operation on Afghanistan, counter-terrorism, counter-narcotics."
    He also said that British and US troops would remain on Afghanistan's front lines for years under an open-ended agreement to be signed at the summit. Hamid Karzai, the Afghan president, has demanded that his forces take over the fight against the Taliban by 2014.
    While his call has been embraced by Western leaders, including Prime Minister David Cameron who set a five-year deadline on the Army's combat role, Mr Rasmussen said troops would not be withdrawn immediately.
    Under a blueprint drawn up by Gen David Petraeus, Nato commander in Afghanistan, foreign troops would "thin out" but not leave disputed territory.
     
  4. Tshering22

    Tshering22 Sikkimese Saber Senior Member

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2010
    Messages:
    4,404
    Likes Received:
    2,783
    Location:
    Gangtok, Sikkim, India
    WELL WELL WELL!! Guess the Bear has already returned to the party and also been really kind to their former enemy the NATO. I think both NATO and Russia are starting to get serious on this Islamist threat that Chechn province in Russia and practically the entire world faces from Af-Pak region. Guys, Russia's entry into Afghanistan would mean an easier stay for Indian mission there as well.

    I just hope that Iran can also put their claws in on west Afghanistan just to rid the area of Taliban; which I guess is bound to happen since all are fed up of their lunacy including the mulla ruled Iran itself.
     
  5. SATISH

    SATISH DFI Technocrat Stars and Ambassadors

    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2009
    Messages:
    2,006
    Likes Received:
    228
  6. ajtr

    ajtr Veteran Member Veteran Member

    Joined:
    Oct 2, 2009
    Messages:
    12,038
    Likes Received:
    715
    Afghan Return for Russian Military Forces

    Posted by Armed Forces International's Political Correspondent on 27/10/2010 - 16:55:00


    New proposals might result in Russian military helicopters returning back to Afghan soil, contributing to NATO efforts to combat Taliban forces in this part of the world.

    If implemented, the plan would see Russian military personnel return to an area that, over two decades ago, they finally left. For the majority of the 1980s, Russian troops were locked in conflict with Afghan rebels prior to withdrawing in 1989.

    Now, the Afghan Army could be close to having use of over 20 Russian-made helicopters and receiving helicopter training from Russian service personnel. Further down the line, the Russian and Afghan militaries could even work together on future missile defence technologies, some military sources have suggested.

    The release of these proposals precedes the visit of Dmitry Medvedev – the President of Russia – to the NATO summit in Portugal in November 2010. According to one official, the presence of Mr Medvedev will partially restore relations damaged when Russian forces entered Georgia two years ago.
    Russian Forces in Afghanistan
    It is believed that details of the scheme to put Russian forces in Afghanistan will be announced at this NATO meeting.

    Reactions within Afghanistan to the prospect of Russian assets returning have been varied, since the Soviet War in Afghanistan caused huge numbers of civilian fatalities. It has been observed, though, that Russian helicopters are already deployed in the country.

    Earlier today, Mi Mikhail Gorbachev – formerly the Russian President – described the prospect of NATO forces winning in Afghanistan as “impossible.”

    “Obama is right to pull the troops out”, he advised the BBC, adding: “No matter how difficult it will be.”
    Russian Military Helicopters
    The Russian armed forces presently operate a wide range of indigenous military helicopter designs.

    Russian Air Force rotary assets include the co-axial Kamov Ka-50 Black Shark and the Mil Mi-24 Hind and both of these operate in the attack role, while Russian transport helicopters include the Mil Mi-8 and the Mi-17.

    Two examples of the latter were recently involved in a secretive UK Afghan helicopter project, through which Afghan Army troops received training in British skies.
     
  7. ajtr

    ajtr Veteran Member Veteran Member

    Joined:
    Oct 2, 2009
    Messages:
    12,038
    Likes Received:
    715
    From the above report.....

    Is it that NATO and russia decided to arm Northern Alliance with offence and deffensive missile so that pakistan wont be able to do 1990 type pranks in Afghanistan this time round.
     
  8. SHASH2K2

    SHASH2K2 New Member

    Joined:
    May 10, 2010
    Messages:
    5,711
    Likes Received:
    723
    Location:
    Bihar, BanGalore , India
    Without USA support Pakistan can never repeat Taliban episode again.This time all players will be careful enough to have enough protection for Afghanistan's vital interests. Afghanistan will be one of vital issues where USA and Russia will be working together to keep Taliban out.
     
  9. ajtr

    ajtr Veteran Member Veteran Member

    Joined:
    Oct 2, 2009
    Messages:
    12,038
    Likes Received:
    715
    Russia's AfPak Policy—A Waiting Game?


    A failure of the international coalition in Afghanistan would jeopardize Russian interests in the region, and do nothing to stem the flow of narcotics from Afghanistan to Russia. Moscow is already committed to helping the coalition in its struggle against the Taliban insurgency. It has agreed to the transport of NATO materials through Russian territory and provided assistance to the coalition, supplying helicopters and training for Afghan security forces.

    In spite of this assistance, there is a growing feeling in the West that Russia could be playing a more decisive role in Afghanistan. Meanwhile, Russians feel that their interests are being marginalized and, in particular, that more should be done to combat Afghan narcotics production.

    In an event hosted by Carnegie Europe, Carnegie Moscow’s Peter Topychkanov talked about Russian policy towards Afghanistan and towards the international coalition in Afghanistan.

    Political support

    President Medvedev has officially expressed his support for the presence of international and American forces in Afghanistan. However, Topychkanov explained the Kremlin still views American activities in Afghanistan with a degree of suspicion, as the authorities do not fully understand their scope, and it quietly applauded President Obama’s decision to set a timeline for the withdrawal of U.S. troops.

    Talking to the Taliban

    The Russian government does not draw a distinction between so-called ‘moderate’ and ‘hard-line’ elements of the Taliban, Topychkanov explained. As a result, Russia does not believe in the idea of a political solution based on engaging with the Taliban.

    Russia’s contribution to the stabilization effort

    Training: Russia has provided training for drugs officers and has encouraged cooperation between its anti-drugs squads and Afghanistan. It also provided technical support to Afghan security forces, to aid in their fight against drug trafficking.

    Technical Support: Russia has provided technical support to the Afghan National Army and security forces, as well as offered officer training.

    Development Assistance: Russia is making significant contributions to development assistance in Afghanistan, primarily by forgiving some of Afghanistan’s debt to the former Soviet Union. It is also providing a degree of support to other development projects, such as the construction of schools and a national power grid.
    Unlike China and India, Russia is wary of developing closer business ties with Afghanistan, Topychkanov explained, citing security concerns as the Kremlin’s chief concern. The first of the Russian investments, a helicopter company, which already operates in Afghanistan, does not have the benefit of support coming from the United States or NATO. He also suggested that there is concern in Russia about the extent to which Afghans still see Russia as a former occupying power, and therefore that a stronger Russian presence might not be welcome in Afghanistan.

    Three Policies for Afghanistan

    Topychkanov suggested that Russia will adopt one of three policies regarding Afghanistan, depending on its perceived needs and its relations with NATO and the United States. These potential policies were influenced by what Topychkanov described as the “Afghan syndrome,” which results from the trauma of the Soviet Union’s abortive occupation of Afghanistan.

    Non-interference: Russia is currently following a policy of non-interference. This is linked to Russian concerns about NATO and U.S. activities in Afghanistan and Pakistan. Topychkanov suggested that, for Russia to change its policy of non-interference, the United States and NATO would have to make their activities more transparent to the Russian authorities.

    Realpolitik: Russia does not have the resources to significantly increase its engagement in Afghanistan. A realpolitik policy would recognize this deficiency and seek primarily to mitigate any potentially negative fallout from Afghanistan. Topychkanov suggested that the central tenet of such a policy would be establishing close ties with the northern provinces of Afghanistan, therefore creating a buffer zone made up of Tajik, Uzbek, and other Northern Caucasus minorities. If Afghanistan were to completely fall apart, Russia could thus envisage the country partitioned into two parts: a safe, Russia-friendly north and a south, inhabited by the Pashtuns, Taliban, and their allies.

    A United Afghanistan: The creation of a united, strong, and centralized Afghan state would require accepting certain elements of the Taliban into the government, as well as the demilitarization of vast stretches of Afghanistan. This approach is based on a U.S. initiative, and Russian authorities seem to look on it favorably, Topychkanov said. This policy holds particular appeal for Russia, as it would allow them to participate in the reconstruction of Soviet built facilities in Afghanistan and regain importance in the region. Russia presented a proposal based on this policy approach during the London conference in January.
    War on drugs

    Drug production in and trafficking from Afghanistan is seen as the most important policy concern for Russian officials, explained Topychkanov. With more than 2 million illegal drug users, Russia is the biggest consumer of drugs originating from the region. Each year, 30,000 or 40,000 people die of drug-related causes in Russia. Increased production of drugs in Afghanistan is thus cause for serious alarm.

    Regional cooperation

    Topychkanov acknowledged that better international and regional cooperation is necessary in order to stabilize the situation in Afghanistan. However, he continued, the strong animosities between the countries who would need to be involved make such cooperation seems virtually impossible. The United States does not want to sit at the negotiating table with Iran. Russia has strained relations with both Iran and Pakistan, and Pakistan has deep concerns about India’s involvement in Afghanistan. It seems unlikely that any international talks could overcome such significant barriers.
     
  10. ajtr

    ajtr Veteran Member Veteran Member

    Joined:
    Oct 2, 2009
    Messages:
    12,038
    Likes Received:
    715
    Russian military could be drawn back into Afghanistan

    Nato officials explore joint initiatives ahead of landmark alliance summit, which is to include President Medvedev

    Russia's military could be drawn back into the Afghanistan theatre for the first time since the Red Army was forcibly expelled by US-backed mujahideen fighters in 1989 under plans being discussed by Nato officials. The proposals precede a landmark alliance summit next month, to be attended by the Russian president, Dmitry Medvedev.

    The officials said several joint Nato-Russian initiatives on Afghanistan were on the table. They include the contribution of Russian helicopters and crews to train Afghan pilots, possible Russian assistance in training Afghan national security forces, increased co-operation on counter-narcotics and border security, and improved transit and supply routes for Nato forces.

    "The summit can mark a new start in the relationship between Nato and Russia," said Anders Fogh Rasmussen, the Nato secretary-general.

    "We will hopefully agree on a broad range of areas in which we can develop practical co-operation on Afghanistan, counter-terrorism, counter-narcotics."

    Rasmussen added: "Russia is strongly interested in increased co-operation … Last December, when I visited Moscow, I suggested that Russia provide helicopters for the Afghan army. Since then Russia has reflected on that and there are now bilateral talks between Russia and the United States. I would not exclude that we will facilitate that process within the Nato-Russia council."

    Western diplomats said it was quite likely that agreements with Moscow on enhanced co-operation in Afghanistan on a range of fronts would be reached in time for the Lisbon Nato summit on 19-20 November.

    Officials said Russian-made helicopters were better adapted to Afghan conditions than their western equivalents. Russian forces gained considerable experience in flying helicopter gunships during the 1979-89 Soviet occupation of Afghanistan, where they are still remembered with fear and loathing.

    With the plans yet to be finalised, officials said there was no question of Russian troops re-entering the country. A Nato spokesman said last night: "There are no plans to reintroduce Russian soldiers into Afghanistan – [it's] not part of Russia's intent, not Afghan, and not ours. Russians may get involved in training helicopter pilots if they provide some helicopters, but not in Afghanistan itself. In the past, Russians have collaborated on training counter-narcotics police outside of country. None of the initiatives on the table involve Russian troops in Afghanistan."

    The attitude of the Afghan government of President Hamid Karzai would be key to the Russian military's mooted involvement in training Afghan national army recruits, a diplomat said.

    "It would be welcome to Isaf [the International Security Assistance Force] if the Russians want to do it and if the Afghans welcome it, too."

    The summit is expected to see a big American and British push for European allies to provide more army and police trainers for Afghan security forces ahead of the scheduled 2014-15 transition to Afghan control.

    "The Russians could make life very difficult for us in Afghanistan but they don't," a western diplomat said, going on to suggest that the difference now was that Moscow was increasingly prepared to be positively helpful.

    New understandings were expected on improved air and land supply and transit arrangements via central Asian states such as Kyrgyzstan and Tajikistan, the diplomat said. This is considered increasingly important given the rising number of insurgent attacks on Nato supply routes through Pakistan and a recent Pakistani government decision to temporarily close the Khyber Pass.

    Russian concerns about the flow of heroin from Afghanistan's poppy fields would also be addressed through new co-operative agreements, officials said.

    The Nato-Russian initiatives are to be accompanied by a summit declaration by Nato and the Karzai government of long-term ties extending beyond 2014-15.

    Medvedev (left) is keen to strengthen Russia's ties with the west after a period of friction that spiked with Russia's war with Nato partner Georgia in 2008.

    The Russian president is also expected to hold a separate, two-hour meeting with the US president, Barack Obama, Rasmussen and other top Nato leaders. Officials said a separate agreement on limited Russian co-operation with Nato's European missile defence plans was also in prospect.

    Medvedev's decision to go to Lisbon, and the raft of new agreements with Moscow, will be seen as the fruit of Obama's policy to "reset" relations with Russia.

    Nato officials said the summit would demonstrate a determination by the alliance and Russia to overcome past differences – and to reach consensus on the nature of 21st-century security threats. Nato's approach is due to be set out at the summit in a new "strategic concept" or mission statement.

    Geopolitical disaster

    Moscow's nine-year intervention in Afghanistan was nothing less than a geopolitical disaster, ending in military humiliation and the collapse of the Soviet Union.

    An ailing Leonid Brezhnev sent troops to Kabul in December 1979. His decision to invade took place against a backdrop of smouldering US-Soviet tensions, stalled nuclear disarmament talks, and a scarcely concealed Kremlin succession struggle. Initially, the operation went well. Elite Soviet troops stormed the main palace in Kabul – and quickly killed its president Hafizullah Amin, whom the KGB regarded as a US agent. They also secured Kabul's airport, as tank columns streamed across the border from Soviet Central Asia.

    But despite capturing the Afghan capital it soon became clear that Russian troops had no control over Afghanistan's provinces and impassable mountains. It was from here that Islamist mujahideen fighters waged a series of devastating counter-attacks. They ambushed Soviet supply routes and troop convoys – the same problems faced by Nato forces today. With Ronald Reagan's victory in November 1980, the US supplied the mujahideen with Stinger missiles, allowing them to down Soviet helicopters.

    At home, meanwhile, the war was unpopular. It fuelled doubts about the wisdom of the Soviet leadership. It undermined belief in the communist state. Internationally, there was condemnation: a western boycott of the 1980 Moscow Olympics followed years of relative 1970s détente. And even diehard communists could see the impracticability of applying socialism to a deeply conservative and tribal society such as Afghanistan.

    By the time Mikhail Gorbachev arrived in the Kremlin in the spring of 1984, it was clear that the Soviet war in Afghanistan was at a dead-end.

    Gorbachev began withdrawing troops in early 1987; the last soldiers left in February 1989. More than 13,000 Soviet troops perished, a further 100,000 were injured, others were captured, several hundred are still missing.

    Russia's return to Afghanistan will inevitably awaken the ghosts of the past and memories of a war best forgotten. Luke Harding
     
  11. ajtr

    ajtr Veteran Member Veteran Member

    Joined:
    Oct 2, 2009
    Messages:
    12,038
    Likes Received:
    715
    No Russian military aid in Afghanistan - Rogozin


    Perhaps NATO is interested in Russia sending its instructors or even troops to assist coalition forces in Afghanistan, but Moscow will never consent to this, according to Russia’s Envoy to NATO Dmitry Rogozin.

    Media reports in Great Britain - a member of the Western Coalition in Afghanistan - are actively discussing all variants of Moscow’s involvement in the NATO campaign. This resulted from Russian President Dmitry Medvedev’s decision to attend the Alliance’s upcoming summit in Lisbon, where he will, among other things, participate in a session of the Russia-NATO Council. The Western media are now wondering what offers for extending cooperation will be offered to Dmitry Medvedev.

    At present, Russia is helping to train Afghan military units for countering drug trafficking and ensures the transit of non-military cargoes for the coalition via its territory. Another area is the so-called “helicopter package” - the issue that topped the agenda of the negotiations during NATO Secretary General Anders Fogh Rasmussen’s visit to the Russian capital. As a result, Moscow provided Poland with five Mi-17 aircraft to be used in Afghanistan. Furthermore, Russian Defense Minister Anatoly Serdyukov said at the meeting with his American counterpart Robert Gates that Russia is prepared to sell or lease helicopters required by the Afghan security forces. NATO is probably seeking additional supplies of these aircraft, as well as training courses for pilots.

    The helicopter package does not provide for the deployment of Russian specialists in Afghanistan. But, according to The Guardian, both the U.S. and Great Britain are interested in getting more instructors to join the ranks of the Afghan police and army. This will help the republic’s authorities to regain control over territories which are currently occupied by coalition forces.

    Thus, in line with western media reports, NATO is seeking more instructors from Moscow as well. But the idea of inviting Russian troops to Afghanistan seems more than incredible, especially given the stand by Russian Envoy to NATO Dmitry Rogozin, who said that Russia will never supply cannon fodder to Afghanistan. Editor-in-Chief of “Russia in Global Affairs” magazine Fyodor Lukyanov shares this view.

    Sending Russian forces to Afghanistan is almost completely impossible, in light of our country’s experience of being involved in the republic’s military operations. Russia’s participation may be limited to military and technical cooperation only, like, for instance, the delivery of helicopters or maintenance support.

    The issue of sending Russian soldiers to Afghanistan can hardly be of any interest to politicians, even though it aroused a certain stir in the media. “We’ve already been in Afghanistan and we didn’t like it much,” Dmitry Rogozin said. A similar issue is the suggestion that Russia will allow the transit of NATO arms, ammunition or manpower via its territory. NATO would certainly benefit from this, since the Taliban keep attacking the Pakistani supply route, but Moscow will definitely renounce it.
     
  12. ajtr

    ajtr Veteran Member Veteran Member

    Joined:
    Oct 2, 2009
    Messages:
    12,038
    Likes Received:
    715
    As Russian troops prepare to return to Afghanistan in landmark agreement, Gorbachev warns Nato victory is impossible



    Moscow agrees to help train Afghan army
    Russia to supply Nato with helicopters
    Watershed agreement to be announced at next month's Nato summit
    Gorbachev warns America of Afghanistan turning into another Vietnam
    Russia is set to return to the war in Afghanistan 21 years after its forces were driven out of the country.
    Moscow has agreed to help train the Afghan army and anti-narcotics troops - at the request of the same Western countries who helped remove Russia from the country in the late 1980s.
    But Mikhail Gorbachev today warned Nato that victory in Afghanistan is 'impossible'.
    The former leader of the Soviet Union, who pulled Russian troops out of Afghanistan in 1989, said President Barack Obama is right to start withdrawing U.S. forces from the country next year.
    But he warned failure to do so would result in the Americans suffering another defeat on the same scale as Vietnam.
    'Victory is impossible in Afghanistan,' Mr Gorbachev said. 'Obama is right to pull the troops out. No matter how difficult it will be.'
    Russia has also agreed in principle to supply Nato with helicopters for use in Afghanistan and has already sold five Mi-17 helicopters to coalition member Poland, reported The Independent. The first two are to be delivered by the end of the year.
    Nato officials today said the U.S. and Russia were working on a package that could see Moscow providing more than 20 helicopters to Afghan forces, thereby hastening the coalition's exit from Afghanistan.
    Nato is also thought to be exploring whether Russia would allow the alliance to ship more goods, including weapons, across its territory to Nato forces in Afghanistan.
    The watershed agreement with Russia is expected to be announced at next month's Nato summit in Lisbon, which is due to be attended by President Dmitry Medvedev.
    Secretary-General Anders Fogh Rasmussen, Nato's top diplomat, today said the alliance believed it was close to a new start in ties with Russia, including a collaboration on a missile defence system.
    He said that President Medvedev's attendance at Nato's annual summit next month would boost relations, strained by Moscow's 2008 invasion of Georgia.
    In return for its aid in Afghanistan, Russia is seeking more co-operation from Nato over the placement of a U.S. missile-defence shield in Poland and the Czech Republic. It also wants Nato to accept its occupation of Georgia.
    Mr Rasmussen told the Financial Times: 'The summit will represent a new start in the relationship between Nato and Russia.
    'It will be a very substantive Nato-Russia summit and definitely the most important event for cooperation since the Rome summit of 2002 when we established the Nato-Russia council.'
    Mr Rasmussen said the Lisbon summit could see Nato and Russia deepening cooperation on Afghanistan.
    He said one of the central issues at the summit would be whether Nato and Russia could begin cooperating on the creation of a missile defence shield.
    Western countries have pressed for a shield as protection from states like Iran, but early plans by Washington were rejected by Russia as a threat to its own nuclear arsenal.
    Mr Rasmussen said he believed Moscow's objections had softened and that the Nato-wide missile defence system could one day link up to Russian radars to give all participating countries better protection.
    'I would expect a decision on missile cooperation to be one of the most important outcomes of the Nato-Russia summit,' he said.
    'Cooperation between Russia and Nato on missile defence will provide us with a very strong framework to develop a true Euro-Atlantic security architecture with one security roof.'


    Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/art...ns-Nato-victory-impossible.html#ixzz13lZih1Ld
     

Share This Page