ANA*-ISIS of Pakistans defeat

Discussion in 'Sports' started by SHASH2K2, Apr 4, 2011.

  1. SHASH2K2

    SHASH2K2 New Member

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    ANALISIS of Pakistans defeat

    ANALISIS of Pakistans defeat
    [video]http://pkpolitics.com/2011/03/31/news-night-with-talat-31-march-2011/[/video]

    Watch it from 25th minutes onwards.
     
    Last edited: Apr 4, 2011
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  3. jatkshatriya

    jatkshatriya Regular Member

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    Well.....a simple anal-ysis by all P a k i s./(hell cant even type P a k i without spaces..lol)...there is an Alien Base on Mars....These aliens have their minions on planet earth inthe form of RAW agents, Hindus and Zionists, and also the CIA agents....Now all these evil agencies reported to their Alien masters that they cannot capture earth untill and unless it is protected by the sword of Islamic Pakistan...the only super power on the planet with their all powerful Nuclear missiles and their ultimate weapon - the anti India and the anti hindu sentiment-------So these aliens fixed the match so that the morals of the pakistanis dip to the lowest and they cannot put up a fight when the aliens invade.....Hell people....prepare for the worst..its not abt the world cup..its about the doomsday..ALIENS ARE COMING AND WE DONT EVEN HAVE PAKISTANI SUPER HUMANS TO PROTECT US......HELPPP
     
  4. SHASH2K2

    SHASH2K2 New Member

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    Pakistani team lost purposely


    Pakistani team lost purposely

    Column from Dallas
    Saeed Qureshi


    Pakistan’s cricket team could have easily won the semi final against India but purposely lost because of the backdoor intrigues. There was no need to garland a captain who knew that the team has brought slur to Pakistan and utter depression and despondency to millions cricket fans from Pakistan and elsewhere, infused with a bubbling spirit of nationalism. This was the fifth consecutive defeat of the Pakistani cricket team at the hands of the Indian team in World Cup matches. What an odious shame? It was categorically easy to chase the meager 260 runs scored by Indian team, all the more when national honor was at stake. There have been visible flaws and deliberate lapses committed by the Pakistani players that turned the tide in favor of the Indian team.

    I would start building up my argument in support my contention by quoting the arch intriguer Rehman Malik’s sudden telephone calls to the captain of the Pakistani team Shahid Khan Afridi. His statement issued, before the departure of the team for India, was pregnant with a hidden threat that implied that it would be better to lose than win. Later while our team was in India he talked three times on phone to Shahid Afridi which the captain labeled as untimely.

    Mr Malik’s this uncalled for statement made while the team was still in Pakistan, was nationally condemned as ominous and perceived as a kind of spanner to dampen the spirits of the team. Mr Malik has earned for himself the role of a person who never means what he says. But in this case he was dam serious of hurling a veiled threat to the Pakistani team. His statement might have two underlying objectives. He meant, “Look we are going to have uniquely crucial parleys with the Indian leadership and we would like to keep the Indians and their government in good humor. If we win the game we lose the positive results that could accrue from the meeting.” Secondly, he might have conveyed that, “you are going to play on the Indian soil and in case you win you could become the target by flared up and enraged Indians.” It should be recalled that on march 3, 2009, the Sri Lankan cricket team was attacked in Pakistan by the terrorists and that was the most appalling event in sports history after the Palestinians massacred the Jewish team in 1972 world Olympics held in Germany.

    Let us now focus on the technical contours of the game. Imran Akmal was as dysfunctional as he has been in previous matches reinforcing the suspicion that he has compromised his game ethics for some ulterior motives that are already well known. It is reported that despite Afridi’s reluctance to include him in the team, he was overruled by the Chairman of the PCB and therefore was imposed upon the team. And look how disappointingly he played and kept his honor and that of the country at stake and finally trampled at the playground.There is no harm in assessing that Misbahul Haq was goaded in advance to go slow and waste the precious overs by not hitting even the most pliable ball. If there is any mechanism to verify this apprehension, the truth will come out. Why Abdul Razzaq, otherwise a brilliant and aggressive player put up a very poor and gloomy performance both in balling and batting. There couldn’t be any earthly reason the way he was sluggish and looked clumsy in performing in his dual role.

    And there are comments that the power play which could have turned the match in favor of the Pakistani team was not sought at the outset of the Afridi’s stepping into the arena. When it was solicited it was too late and the damage had already been done. Imran Khan an accomplished cricketer who has the distinction of being the skipper of the team that won the first ever world cup in 1992, argues that with the “worst kind of fielding that the Pakistani team displayed, no team could have won.”

    Distastefully the politicians, the bookies, the gamblers and intentional stake holders have infiltrated into the world of sports and it is they who write the script, choreograph the games especially the cricket and decide who should win and which side should lose. But the only team whose players have remained as an easy prey to the trappings of the huge money was mostly Pakistani. Recently, three of Pakistan’s ace players have been awarded fines and bans imposed on their playing for long periods of time. The charges against them are as crystal clear as the 1000 watt bulb lighted in the small dark cubicle. So with this backlog of bad reputation there is very little benefit of doubt that can be given to the Pakistani team that played in Mohali Punjab and brought for Pakistan a disgrace and shame that in minuscule proportion is equal to the surrender of Pakistan’s valiant army in Palton Maidan in December 16, 1971 to the Indian army. Now defeat is defeat and it is most of the times humiliating. There is no pride attached to defeat as the circles and various lobbies are trying to portray it as such. Pakistan cricket team’s defeat at the hands of a traditional rival India for the fifth time is not matter to rejoice or self complimenting. It is to lament and grieve. If a defeat unites the nation as being interpreted, then no difference or distance is left between sanity and delusion. Waiting for four years to avenge this defeat? Is anyone among the crowd of self consolers to presage with absolute certainly that Pakistan would be winning then? Our money loving players will again fall prey to the irresistible monetary temptations and thus the hope and expectations pinned on the next world cup in 2015, would fall apart again.

    It is the present that matters. In a similar situation, Mirza Ghalib the eternal poet said in sheer despondency, “Kaun Jeeta Hay Teri Zulf Kay Sar Honay Tak”. It nearest rendering in English is, “Who can claim to live until the time of surmounting your lock ( tuft of beloved’s hair).” Nevertheless, May God bless our gullible nation eternally with his bounties and blessings.

    —The writer is a senior journalist and a former diplomat.
     
  5. SHASH2K2

    SHASH2K2 New Member

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    I was 110% confident that Sachin was out, says Ajmal


    Pakistan off-spinner Saeed Ajmal is still perplexed over why the Decision Review System (DRS) overturned on-field umpire Ian Gould's lbw ruling against Sachin Tendulkar during the World Cup semi-final against India in Mohali. Tendulkar, who scored a valuable innings of 85, was dropped four times besides surviving a close leg before call off the bowling of Ajmal, who is convinced that he had the master batsman trapped. "I don't know how the television replays showed my delivery turning towards the leg side because I had bowled an arm ball and it went straight. I was 110% confident when the referral was made that the batsman was out," Ajmal said.
    The DRS has been regularly used in the World Cup, with some of the decisions raising questions over the accuracy of the technology, used to track the movement, spin or height of the ball.
    Ajmal said he was pleased with his bowling performance in the semi-final but would have loved to see a Pakistan victory.
    "All of us were very disappointed at losing the match because their was so much interest and hype attached to it. But in cricket one team has to lose and one has to win," he noted.
    Pakistan's young pacer, Wahab Riaz, who took a five-for, said the semi-final was one of his most memorable matches and he would forever treasure his five-wicket haul.
    "The wickets of Sehwag and Yuvraj were most memorable for me as they are very dangerous players of pace and spin," Riaz said.
    "To get a chance to bow down to Allah on Indian soil was a big moment for me," he added.
    Opener Mohammad Hafeez urged the fans to keep faith in the team.
    "This team has a lot of capability and will get better results in the future," he said.
    For team manager Intikhab Alam, the most satisfying aspect was the way the team had gelled and played as a unit throughout the tournament.
    "My main task was to unite the team and make it perform collectively and I think we achieved that to a great extent and that is satisfying for me," he said.
    Senior players Younis Khan, Misbah-ul-Haq and the retired Shoaib Akhtar avoided the media on their return to the country.



     
  6. TheLord

    TheLord Regular Member

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    You have to visit the pakistani forums to see how they spin new conspiracy theories to satisfies their ego. They could not digest the defeat from their enemy India.

    Here are the core things, those conspiracy theories are based on....

    1. ICC is filled with Indian or Indian origin (evil Hindoos) and India used the ICC to force the pakistan loose the match
    2. Indian bookie mafia threatened the **** team to loose
    3. Indian Government threatened the pakistan government to loose the match

    and most funny themes follow...

    1. they lost purposely to make peace with India.
    2. they lost purposely to avoid a Hindu - Muslim riot in India and hence saved the Indian Muslims being slaughtered by evil Hindoos
    3. they lost it to save the Kashmiris being slaughtered

    and much more might be invented, while I post this.
     
  7. SHASH2K2

    SHASH2K2 New Member

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    Cricketers return home as heroes


    PAKISTANIS appear to have tamed the wild ghosts within. Punjab Chief Minister Mian Shahbaz Sharif is at hand to receive the Pakistani cricketers who stumbled — and that too against India — when the world glory was only a couple of strides away from them.

    Refreshingly, the cricketers who come back from India are hardly reminiscent of the garlanded prisoners of war whose release ZAB had managed to secure some four decades ago. The throwback to the emotional outpouring of 1996 — when Pakistan lost to India in the quarter-finals in Bengaluru — or of 1999 — when the side went down against Australia in the finals without as much as a protest — have been avoided.
    Mr Sharif, who is known for his penchant for seizing a popular moment when he sees one, implies this was not war but a game of cricket and for once everyone agrees. The praise he and other prominent figures have directed towards the national cricketers is aided by a wave of voices that has replaced the euphoria generated by a semi-final between Pakistan and India.
    From everywhere in the country emanate statements that hail the team for progressing up to the last-four stage, at a time when few gave them any chance. Pakistanis have been graceful in defeat and have thus defied those who are, as always, trying to exploit the sentiments for good business.
    The rumours about a sellout, revelations about bookies, the expert analyses that highlight tactical mistakes, even a reference to the intimidating partisanship flaunted by the hosts, these have not quite been able to so far catch the fancy of the Pakistani public. It is as if they are in a hurry to put this bad moment behind them and move on.
    The Pakistanis have grown up and the reasons for the maturity they have displayed may not be too easy to put a finger on. In any case, it will be difficult to pinpoint all the ingredients that have contributed to this sober offering. Having said that, a few factors that are hampering sales by the ever emotional businessmen may be more easily identifiable.
    For one, the pace has picked up and there is much more cricket now than was the case, say, in the 1990s. The introduction of the T20 format and the holding of the T20 world cup tournament every other year means that the opportunity to shine at an international championship is not as rare as it used to be. Even otherwise there is so much cricket going on and so great is the hype around it that it has enabled the followers to reconcile with their victories and their losses much better than they were able to in the past.
    Recall the T20 triumph a couple of years ago. It was as if there was not enough time for celebration with another edition of the cup looming a few months on.
    Hopes may seldom be proportional to potential but Pakistanis knew that theirs was a weaker side as compared to many others, including the Indian team. This was unlike the past occasions.
    Pakistanis felt that they had been weakened by design and if the post-match conversations are a guide to public thinking, Pakistan has done sufficiently well to defeat the ‘discriminatory’ international system. This is in sync with the general Pakistani take on all affairs related to politics and their relations with the rest of the world.
    The Pakistani side entered the semi-final as a ghazi and a shaheed at the same time. That they had beaten Sri Lanka and Australia in their pool and reached the semis was popularly considered in the country to be a singular feat given that they had been the victim of yet another ‘international conspiracy’ only a few months earlier.
    The Pakistan cricket received a killer blow in the banning of two of its best bowlers who had carried their country’s hopes for a good showing in the tenth edition of the World Cup tournament. To the victims, the timing of the sentence given to Muhammad Aamir and Muhammad Asif — just weeks before the start of the world cup — was a reconfirmation of the international plot.
    To many a common Pakistani the ICC was a body hell bent on ensuring a depleted Pakistan side for the tournament. Without the sinisterous pace of Aamir and the dexterity of Asif Pakistan’s World Cup campaign was ‘designed’ to flounder much earlier than it did actually.
    As Pakistanis have defeated one conspiracy, and as we celebrate our maturity, perhaps some concern should be shown for another factor that may have played a profound role in shaping our non-arrogant reactions today. A people so precariously caught in a war, Pakistanis have mastered the art of how to come to terms with their grief.
    In the circumstances, they lack the arrogance that is a by-product of security and confidence and is sustained and exploited to the maximum by the market, as may be the case in another country, say India. Constantly attacked by terrorists, the people of Pakistan have learnt how to forget and move on. Deaths and revelations and defeats do not scare us as much as they did in the 1990s. On to the next contest then — with a desire for win, but with our ‘no fear’ jerseys on.
    [​IMG]
     
  8. SHASH2K2

    SHASH2K2 New Member

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    How Indians have ruined cricket — I


    One of the disappointing things about the World Cup was that it was played in the subcontinent.
    It is thought that India loves cricket. This is incorrect. India loves India. Cricket gives us the opportunity to express this affection. The local cricket match in India is unattended. Even World Cup matches featuring two other sides will be played without spectators, no matter what the calibre of the players. This is unlike World Cup football, or American football and basketball. What attracts Indian spectators isn’t cricket, the sport, in that sense.
    Let us observe the pattern of crowd behaviour.
    Indian spectators express themselves physically, through dancing, screaming and jumping about. This is done communally, in groups often including middle-aged men. It is done emotionally, with strong facial expressions. Sunil Gavaskar says he was amazed to first play at Lord’s 40 years ago because of the way the audience applauded. It was, he said, always three claps. Clap-clap-clap — silence. But that is why cricket is an English sport. We behave like a WWF audience. Strange things excite us. Calcuttans set their stands alight at the end of every match, a Neanderthal fascination with fire.
    In the European nations (England, Australia, South Africa, New Zealand), spectator behaviour is more individual. Where communication is visual, it is not through facial expression, but fancy dress.
    Instead of screaming, expression is through the written word: Banners.
    In India, signs are held up which are either obvious or embarrassingly banal. A decade ago, they were also poorly spelled. These days they’re not, because advertisers hand out printed ones. This defeats the purpose of spectator banners; and that is spontaneity. There is never real humour, which can only come when we are able to laugh at ourselves.
    In February 1993, South Africa was chasing 208 against Pakistan at Durban. From 158 for 1, they were all out for 198, five of them clean-bowled by the great Waqar Younis.
    As his yorkers were bringing doom to the last few, a South African held up a large sheet on which she had scrawled ‘Waqar the springbok faqar’. So clever, I remember it 18 years later. Indians write rubbish.
    Foreign commentators often say that the crowd in Chennai is ‘knowledgeable’. In saying this they mean that they don’t go off on bump balls, like the crowd does elsewhere in India.
    One unique thing is how Indian spectators are silent when the other team scores. On television, it’s as if the screen has gone mute. It’s not about enjoying a sport and appreciating the ability of professionals to play it. It’s about nationalism, which in India is narrow and zero-sum. If they score even a little victory; a boundary, our tumescence droops. The Bengali thinks he’s different, but this is untrue. Imminent defeat against the Lankans in 1996’s World Cup resulted in Calcuttans rioting in Eden Gardens, and, as Indians tend to do, damaging the property that they could barely afford.
    The Indian team is overrated because our fierce nationalism inflates its capacity. This has been amplified recently because of our economic power. Ten years ago, opponents thought little of us, and rightly. Against the quality team, India’s record is to fold. We regularly get a thrashing from Australia (won 36, lost 61), old enemy Pakistan (46: 69) and newcomers South Africa (24: 40). Even West Indies, 25 years in decline, have a superior record (38: 54).
    Usually, Indians are happy to win the skirmish and lose the battle. This is because national honour is often safeguarded by the hero. The astute Ian Chappell noticed that Indians were content if Sachin Tendulkar scored his 100, even if India then lost. In Australia this would never happen, he said, and it would be seen as defeat, which it is. Since his audience telegraphs this, the Indian cricketer plays for himself much more than players of other sides. An analysis of Sachin’s scoring pattern between 90 and 100 will be interesting.
    The other thing that separates the Indian audience from the European is the level of security.
    Years ago, David Gower speculated on why Indians flung things at fielders on the boundary. The intent wasn’t to hurt, he said generously, just to distract, “Though there were one or two good arms out there.”
    Why do we throw things? It’s difficult for others to follow our manner of forcibly inserting ourselves into the action through such simian behaviour.
    The Indian is deeply prejudiced against Africans, and Black players have always been targeted (some will be offended by this sweeping allegation. I am open to the idea that the Indian is an equal-opportunity vandal). A bottle hit Vasbert Drakes at Rajkot in 2002, ending the match there. That was the third time in a week that West Indians were attacked in India, the other two places being Jamshedpur and Nagpur. This sort of thing has now stopped. Why? Because Indian spectators are watched over like inmates.
    On all Indian grounds, a wire mesh now separates players from the unpredictable Indian audience. This is shameful, but passes unnoticed in our culture. In Australia, New Zealand, South Africa, West Indies and England, this isn’t needed.
    The policing here is excessive, but necessary. Geoffrey Boycott was upset after his sandwiches were confiscated by security in Delhi earlier in the tournament. I sympathise with him for being forced to eat the crew’s Mughlai lunch. Sir Geoffrey is working class and sees no appeal in the exotic. I think a bit of racial profiling is fine, and we should be firm only with Indians.
     
  9. Patriot

    Patriot Senior Member Senior Member

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    They can give lacs of wired excuses for their defeat except accepting the defeat with grace. This kind of attitude shows the hollowness of the psyche with obvious sense of insecurity & mistrust in themselves.

    If , one have lost , only best thing one can do is accept the defeat with grace rest is BS.
     
  10. Virendra

    Virendra Moderator Moderator

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    Well if thats an excuse to forget their own defeat then they can go to hell with their ideas. But if it is to highlight the misbehavior of Indian crowd, I agree that we have some useless howlers who dont have grey matter inside their skulls. But their behavior is even worse/different than being racist .. they have so many times attacked the Indian players as well .. bottles, metal nuts, bolts and what not. There's no shame in wanting your team win everytime but those few ugly occassions should make us think of how the cricket obsession has made these idiots have irrational expectations. Yes we have may be one such scum in every 1000.

    Regards,
    Virendra
     
  11. debasree

    debasree Regular Member

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    Dont u know the story of fox & grapes ***** r like that,do continue to post such imaginative post may be one day u will be selected for booker prize
     

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