American NSA to visit India to strengthen bilateral ties

Discussion in 'Foreign Relations' started by youngindian, Jun 23, 2009.

  1. youngindian

    youngindian Senior Member Senior Member

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    The Hindu News Update Service



    Monday, June 22, 2009

    Washington (PTI): US National Security Advisor General Jim Jones will visit New Delhi as part of the ongoing effort of the Obama Administration to "deepen and strengthen" its relationship with India, the White House said today.

    "General Jones's visit to New Delhi is part of our ongoing effort to further deepen and strengthen our key bilateral partnership with India," spokesman of National Security Council Mike Hammer said.

    Jones, who will visit New Delhi from June 25 on the invitation of his Indian counterpart M K Narayanan, is expected to discuss a wide range of bilateral issues with him and other top Indian officials during his stay. He will also visit Afghanistan and Pakistan.

    "At the request of the President, National Security Advisor Jones is traveling to Afghanistan and Pakistan to follow-up on the implementation of our new, comprehensive strategy," Hammer said.

    He will have meetings with host country officials, Embassy personnel, international coalition representatives, and military commanders," the spokesman said in a statement.

    The security situation in the region with special focus on Pakistan and Afghanistan and bilateral concerns are expected to figure in Jones' meetings with Indian side during his two-day visit.
     
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  3. Singh

    Singh Phat Cat Administrator

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    Clinton says U.S.-India ties need "upgrade"


    WASHINGTON (Reuters) - U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton said on Wednesday Washington's relations with India needed an "upgrade" and urged closer cooperation on security, trade and other issues.

    Clinton is set to visit India next month and she said she hoped the two nations could work together to solve global challenges from climate change to securing Afghanistan.

    "As we pursue an enhanced bilateral relationship, we should recognize that, compared to other metrics of our cooperation, our official ties are past due for an upgrade," Clinton said in a speech to the U.S.-India Business Council.

    "We need the bilateral cooperation between our governments to catch up with our people-to-people and economic ties."

    Last year, India and Washington signed a landmark civil nuclear deal, overturning a 30-year ban on global nuclear commerce with India.

    That deal will allow India to procure nuclear technology and fuel for its reactors from the international market.

    To improve ties, she said Washington and New Delhi must overcome mistrust and address what she said were lingering uncertainties in the relationship.

    She said some Americans feared that greater economic ties with India would mean lost jobs and falling wages, while Indians felt a closer partnership ran counter to the country's strong tradition of independence.

    She also pledged closer economic and trade ties and said negotiations would begin soon on a bilateral investment treaty, creating more opportunities for trade between the two countries.

    "President Obama has been clear that the United States has learned the lessons of the past. We will not use the global financial crisis as an excuse to fall back on protectionism," she said.

    Without providing details, Clinton said the two countries needed to increase cooperation in fighting terrorism and improve intelligence-sharing.

    "The president and I are committed to enhancing India's ability to protect itself," she said, adding that six Americans died in the November attacks on India's financial capital, Mumbai.

    She welcomed Tuesday's meeting between the leaders of India and Pakistan, their first talks since the Mumbai attacks, which New Delhi blamed on the Pakistan-based Lashkar-e-Taiba militant group.

    "As Pakistan now works to take on the challenge of terrorists in its own country, I am confident India, as well as the United States, will support that effort," Clinton said.

    Clinton says U.S.-India ties need upgrade | Politics | Reuters
     
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    Barack Obama may visit India by year-end


    NEW DELHI: Indo-US ties are set to get a boost from a series of high-level visits from Washington that will culminate with the visit of US
    President Barack Obama to India later this year. Mr Obama is likely to visit India at the end of the year. But, before that Prime Minister Manmohan Singh and Mr Obama are likely to meet at the G-8 summit in Italy in July.

    Top level diplomatic engagements are taking place between the two countries in the coming weeks and these visits are expected to set the tone and pace of the Indo-US ties. US National Security Advisor General James Jones is expected in India for a two-day visit starting Thursday. Gen Jones, who comes to India after visiting Pakistan and Afghanistan, is set to update the Indian leadership on Pakistan. At the same time, New Delhi is expected to give its reading of the situation in Pakistan and Afghanistan. Security issues are set to figure prominently.

    The visit of the American NSA will pave the way for the highly-anticipated visit of US secretary of state Hillary Clinton at the end of July. Ms Clinton’s visit to India will set the agenda for bilateral ties between the two countries. Ms Clinton had recently said she wants to “dramatically” expand ties with New Delhi, and sought to allay India’s concerns on issues like protectionism. She has also said US would like to give India a greater platform to solve global challenges.

    At this point, New Delhi sees a congruence of Indian and American interests in various areas, but is also cognisant of the fact that there will be difference of opinion on a number of issues. Though Indo-US ties are expected to get a boost, the Obama administration has also been quite clear that its main focus is on the situation in Pakistan and Afghanistan.

    New Delhi is slowly getting a reading of the Obama administration’s policies on various issues. The latest statement from Mr Obama has erased some concerns about the new administration’s approach to Kashmir in the backdrop of the Af-Pak policy. Mr Obama has ruled out US mediation in Kashmir and favoured dialogue between India and Pakistan.

    Barack Obama may visit India by year-end- Politics/Nation-News-The Economic Times
     

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