Al Qaeda, Taliban are now headquartered in Pakistan': Experts

Discussion in 'Pakistan' started by arya, Aug 2, 2010.

  1. arya

    arya Senior Member Senior Member

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    'Al Qaeda, Taliban are now headquartered in Pakistan': Experts
    2010-08-02 19:30:00

    Former Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) agent Henry Crumpton and Afghan Intelligence chief Amrullah Saleh have said that al Qaeda and Taliban are now headquartered in Pakistan.

    "Al Qaeda and Taliban are now headquartered in Pakistan. The bulk of people we kill, neutralize or capture in Afghanistan are the expendable part of the terror network. The leadership is there, and they are not feeling the heat, apart from these occasional drone attacks," the CBS News quoted Saleh, as saying.

    Agreeing with Saleh's statement, Crumpton said that in Pakistan and elsewhere where there is a safe haven enemies, where they are the power and the status quo, the security force must act as insurgents.

    "We must work and recruit with locals, and we must collect intelligence. We must engage in subversion and sabotage, and be very precise. Ultimately, that's how you win this type of war. You have to empower the locals so they have the victory," he added.

    Crumpton, who helped defeat the Taliban and al Qaeda in Afghanistan at one point by using this technique, said that if he was still at his old job at the CIA, he would have done the same thing.

    "Ultimately, that's how you win this type of war. You have to empower the locals so they have the victory," he said.

    Amrullah Saleh has also been hunting for Osama bin Laden and Taliban leader Mullah Omar and has vowed to continue his fight against the Taliban and al Qaeda whether the Americans stay or leave Afghanistan.

    Crumpton predicted that the terrorist outfit could attack again and this time it could be even greater than 9/11
     
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  3. ganesh177

    ganesh177 Regular Member

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    Will nato go on chasing the leaders now from afghanistan to pakistan ?
    Not drones, a full fledged operation.
     
  4. neo29

    neo29 Senior Member Senior Member

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    These so called "experts" must know that every indian know this for years. Every indian is an expert.
     
  5. Indianrabbit

    Indianrabbit Regular Member

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    Pakistan is not Afghanistan and if the news is true they will repent it in future. They should rename themselves to Goanistan or Terroristan, that will suit better.
     
  6. Jeypore

    Jeypore Regular Member

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    This statement has no merit or any form of proof. It is likely, that Al Qaeda is in Pakistan, but are not capable of, organizational, all out Islamic war against the Infidels!!!

    The problem with this war for Nato is that the locals turn against them at anytime!!!!

    This article does not hold any merit....
     
    Last edited: Aug 3, 2010
  7. Rage

    Rage DFI TEAM Stars and Ambassadors

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    This is probably it, the groundwork for the invasion of Pakisthan.

    Don't mean to be cruel about it, but the floods provide the perfect opportunity for the Taliban to regroup, recoup & retaliate up in the high mountains away from the plains. Even as the closure of national highways and airbases means the army cannot carry out its operations.

    There seems to be all the weird sounds coming out from coalition nations. And a lampooning Pakistan've been recently receiving from the press.

    And yet, the people of Pakistan will not rise up and riot.
     
  8. Jeypore

    Jeypore Regular Member

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    For Who, NATO or India????
     
  9. neo29

    neo29 Senior Member Senior Member

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    India wont invade pakistan coz it knows US and NATO will have too.

    Simple and amazing game plan by NATO and US. Now after fighting in afghanistan and reaching the af-pak border now they will be conducting operations inside pakistan. What will be next is easily predictable. Its all step by step procedure to deal with a nuclear weapon state. Pak aint Iraq and Afghan that you roll your troops and fighters into the country.

    Why to invade a country when you can systematically get into it creating chaos so that they depend on you ?
     
  10. Jeypore

    Jeypore Regular Member

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    Mr. NEO29 you are full of Paradox statements

    and
    Neither India, US or NATO can attack Pakistan today, and that is the truth, because by doing so all have to go thru UN Council, So Guys make some sense into your statements... The real solution to the problem is to win Afganistan, and Pakistan is Checkmate!!!! As you can see clearly that even for NATO, Afganistan is hard to take control off...
     
  11. neo29

    neo29 Senior Member Senior Member

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    Most UN council members were against Iraq invasion still US went ahead. Russia attacked Georgia without UN approval. So we dont need UN council approval to invade a country. See history before making claims

    Pakistan is already checkmated with Indian presence in Afghanistan. Its only how long can India sustain that since pakistan is trying every trick in the book to remove India from Afghan.

    Pakistan thinks Afghan belongs to them and everything related to afghan must involve them. But what the hell is the Afghan govt doing after seeing such ownership behavior from pakistan. Solution is change in ideology that has been induced for years together. It will take hell of time just like it took to de-nazify germany.
     
  12. Jeypore

    Jeypore Regular Member

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    Pakistan does not want not be isolated by there neighbors, saying this, they are in fight of there lives to do whatever it takes!!!! And the tools that Pakistanies are using is so simple and that is Religion!!!

    Let me ask you some few basic questions:

    Why is the border between Pakistan and Afganistan so fantastic???
    Even after NATO's presence, why did Indian embassy get bombed???
    What is America after??? Taliban or Osama...
    Why is America using Drone Attacks into Pakistan territory before even controlling Afganistan??
     
  13. ajtr

    ajtr Veteran Member Veteran Member

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    Washington fiddles away as Pakistan burns in civil war

    Tony Karon
    Last Updated: August 03. 2010 12:20AM UAE / August 2. 2010 8:20PM GMT
    The relationship between Pakistan’s security establishment and the Afghan Taliban supposedly “revealed” by the WikiLeaks document dump was hardly news, but it prompted a familiar round of handwringing in Washington about America’s “Pakistan problem”.

    Pakistan is playing both sides of the conflict in Afghanistan, the pundits complained. When will it wake up to the fact that America’s enemies are its enemies, too, the congressmen asked. And why isn’t the White House going to hold their feet to the fire?

    As can be expected in a political discourse deaf to how US actions are experienced abroad, nobody was talking about Pakistan’s “America problem” – although that may be the key to understanding the issue.

    The WikiLeaks saga simply reaffirmed conventional wisdom among Afghanistan watchers. Pretty much every congressional hearing on Afghanistan since 2004 has heard how the Taliban’s sanctuaries in Pakistan enable the insurgency, and how the Taliban leadership operates out of Quetta. A steady stream of media reports over the same period have alleged ongoing Pakistani operations to arm and supply the Afghan insurgents. The Pakistani Army periodically concludes non-aggression pacts with insurgents in the Tribal Areas that leave them free to operate in Afghanistan as long as they refrain from attacks in Pakistan.

    Urging Pakistan to “do more” against the Taliban has been a routine talking point for US envoys visiting Pakistan for the best part of a decade. There have been periodic confrontations, such as when the CIA officials in 2008 presented the ISI with evidence tying it to a Haqqani network bomb attack in Kabul.

    And just last month, the Harvard scholar Matthew Waldman published research based on the testimonies of a number of insurgent commanders detailing the central role played by the ISI in the command of Afghan Taliban units and those of the Haqqani network.


    Despite all of that, Pakistan has, in fact, played a major role in the US campaign against al Qa’eda – and it has suffered far more than any other US ally for doing so. The former president Gen Pervez Musharraf agreed, under tremendous pressure in the wake of the September 11 terror attacks in 2001, to support US retaliation for those attacks in Afghanistan. But his own citizenry was overwhelmingly opposed to cooperation with the US – at the time, polls found upward of 80 per cent of Pakistanis sympathising with the Taliban.

    The Taliban was a protege of the Pakistani military establishment, which had installed it in power in 1996 to stabilise post-Soviet Afghanistan under the rule of a friendly regime.

    Pakistan’s goal in Afghanistan has always been to prevent itself from being strategically encircled by India, which plays the same game in reverse. New Delhi has long been a key regional patron of the anti-Taliban Northern Alliance which brought Hamid Karzai to power.

    Pakistan has paid a heavy price for its co-operation with Washington. Today, some Americans argue against ending the war in Afghanistan because it would embolden the Pakistan Taliban and risk a nuclear-armed state falling to extremists. But for Pakistan’s security establishment, the American presence in Afghanistan is the cause of their domestic insurgency, not the solution to it. It began when Gen Musharraf, at the behest of the US, sent his military into the tribal areas to search for foreign fighters, a fight which has since raged out of control.

    One of the few voices in Washington that seemed to “get” the Pakistani perspective last week was Michael Scheuer, who formerly headed the CIA station charged with apprehending bin Laden. “The army’s operations have sparked a civil war between Islamabad and the tribesmen,” Scheuer wrote in The Diplomat. “For several years this struggle was confined to the tribal lands, but since 2008 it has spread into Pakistan proper, bringing repeated bombings, ambushes, assassinations and commando-style raids.”

    Rather than “do more” for the US on the eve of its departure, Scheuer suggests: “For [Gen Ashfaq] Kayani and [President Asif Ali] Zardari, the time clearly has come to stop being a US proxy and to focus on halting Pakistan’s drift toward becoming a failed state. Because Washington has no clue that the services rendered it by Musharraf and Zardari caused the civil war now raging in Pakistan, Kayani and Zardari can expect nothing from Obama’s administration except demands for actions that would ultimately destroy Pakistan’s stability.”

    Instead, as the US prepares to depart and looks for a political solution, the Pakistani generals will see their strategy of maintaining the Taliban as a vehicle to restore Pakistani influence in Kabul as being vindicated. Even Mr Karzai has turned to Islamabad, now – to the alarm of his Northern Alliance partners and their regional backers – looking for Pakistan’s help in securing a settlement with the Taliban. Far from putting Pakistan at greater risk, that country’s security establishment will see the US withdrawal and restoration of the Taliban to at least a share of power in Afghanistan as an opportunity to begin stabilising a very dangerous situation at home.
     
  14. arya

    arya Senior Member Senior Member

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    well you can win against terror unless Pakistan
     
  15. Blackwater

    Blackwater Veteran Member Veteran Member

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    Al-Qaeda's roots grow deeper in Pakistan

    ISLAMABAD - Ten years after the 9/11 terrorist attacks on New York City's twin World Trade Center towers and the Pentagon and the subsequent "war on terror" launched by United Stated-led forces against al-Qaeda, the terrorist group continues to pose a serious threat to the world as it keeps surviving and thriving mainly on the Pakistan-Afghanistan tribal belt.

    In these rugged areas it has established an effective jihadi network that increasingly exploits its Pakistani affiliates to carry on the global jihadi agenda of Osama bin Laden, despite his May 2 killing in a United States military raid in Abbottabad in Pakistan.
    Until recently, analysts have been mostly focusing on the dangers posed by the growing Talibanization of Pakistan. Yet, it has now become abundantly clear that the time has come to pay more


    attention to the bigger dangers posed by the Pakistanization of al-Qaeda.

    Since US president George W Bush's declaration of war against global terrorism in September 2001, the US and its allies claim to have killed or captured over 75% of senior al-Qaeda leaders, the latest being Younis al-Mauritania, suspected of directing attacks against the US and Europe, who was arrested on September 5, 2011, during a raid in Quetta, the capital of Balochistan province in Pakistan.

    Yet, the frequency of terror attacks worldwide being attributed to the al-Qaeda network has increased, as compared to the pre-9/11 period, the latest being the September 7 twin suicide attacks targeting the residence of the deputy inspector general of the Balochistan Frontier Corps in Quetta, which killed 24 people.

    Pakistani terrorism experts believe that the current spate of high-intensity attacks, despite Bin Laden's death four months ago, make obvious that al-Qaeda's core elements are still resilient and that the outfit is cultivating stronger operational connections that radiate outward from hideouts in Pakistan to affiliates scattered throughout the Middle East, North Africa and Europe.

    Therefore, as things stand, it appears that al-Qaeda not only remains in business in its traditional stronghold in the Waziristan tribal region on the largely lawless Pakistan-Afghanistan tribal belt border, it has also clearly advanced to the urban areas in all the four provinces of Pakistan.

    This is confirmed by the growing belief of the Barack Obama administration that if there is one country that matters most to the future of al-Qaeda, it is Pakistan.

    A solid base
    Al-Qaeda, which means "The Base" in Arabic, was founded in 1988 by Bin Laden with the aim of overthrowing the US-dominated world order. The outfit was relatively unknown until the 9/11 terror attacks when its operatives hijacked four US airliners and successfully crashed two of them into the World Trade Center towers in New York, with a third plane hitting the Pentagon building in Washington and a fourth one crashing in Pennsylvania as the passengers attempted to regain control of the plane.

    In an exclusive interview with Geo television on July 23, 2008, Mustafa Abu Yazid alias Sheikh Saeed, then the third senior-most al-Qaeda leader after Bin Laden and Dr Ayman Zawahiri, confessed for the first time that the 9/11 attacks were carried out by 19 al-Qaeda operatives.

    As US-led forces launched a ruthless military offensive in Afghanistan in the aftermath of 9/11, the Afghanistan-based al-Qaeda leadership started systematically moving its fighters across their eastern border into Pakistan, where they effectively took over the rugged mountainous Federally Administered Tribal Areas (FATA) after joining hands with local militants.

    The al-Qaeda leadership's choice of using the FATA region, especially the North and South Waziristan tribal agencies as their hideout, has enabled the terror outfit to build a new power base, separate from Afghanistan. As a result, despite Pakistan's extensive contribution to the "war on terror", many questions persist about the extent to which al-Qaeda and its allied groups are operating within Pakistan.

    Al-Qaeda's success in forging close ties to Pakistani jihadi groups has given it an increasingly secure haven in the mountainous tribal areas of Pakistan. These regions have replaced Afghanistan as the key training and indoctrination grounds for al-Qaeda recruits to be used in operations abroad and for training those indoctrinated and radicalized elsewhere.

    The international community continues to portray Pakistan as a breeding ground for the Taliban militia and a sanctuary for fugitive al-Qaeda leaders. Despite repeated denials by Pakistani authorities, the global media keep reporting them having already established significant bases in Peshawar and Quetta, and carrying out cross-border ambushes against their targets in Afghanistan, while al-Qaeda suicide bombing teams target US-led forces from their camps in the mountainous region.

    The general notion that al-Qaeda is getting stronger even after the decade-long "war on terror", can be gauged from the fact that Pakistan, despite being a key US ally during all those years, is undergoing a radical change, moving from the phase of Talibanization of its society to the Pakistanization of al-Qaeda.

    Many of the key Pakistani jihadi organizations, which are both anti-American and anti-state, have already joined hands with al-Qaeda to let loose a reign of terror across Pakistan. The meteoric rise of the Taliban militia in Pakistan, especially after 9/11, has literally pushed the Pakistani state to the brink of civil war, claiming over 35,000 lives in terrorism-related incidents between 2001 and 2011.

    Terrorism experts believe that the Pakistanization of al-Qaeda is rooted in decades of collaboration between elements of the Pakistani military and the intelligence establishment and extremist jihadi movements that birthed and nurtured al-Qaeda, which has evolved significantly over the years from a close-knit group of Arab Afghans to a trans-national Islamic global insurgency, dominated by more and more Pakistani militants.

    American intelligence agencies believe that with a surge of motivated youth flooding towards the realm of jihad and joining al-Qaeda cadres, Pakistan remains a potential site for recruitment and training of militants as the fugitive leadership of the outfit keeps hiring local recruits with the help of their local affiliates in Pakistan. This is to bolster the manpower of al-Qaeda, which has grown from strength to strength despite the arrest and killing of hundreds of its operatives from within Pakistan since 2001.

    These experts believe, despite the physical elimination of al-Qaeda founder Bin Laden, that his terrorist outfit remains a potent threat to global peace as it keeps blooming in the Pakistan-Afghanistan tribal belt. They say al-Qaeda, for all practical purposes, is now a Pakistani phenomenon as a good number of the anti-American sectarian and jihadi groups in the country have joined the terrorist network, making Pakistan the nerve center of al-Qaeda's global operations.

    Investigations into the May 22, 2011, fidayeen (suicide) attack on the Mehran Naval Base in the southern Pakistani port city of Karachi have revealed that it was a coordinated operation involving al-Qaeda's Waziristan-based chief operational commander from Egypt, Saif Al Adal, the outfit's top military strategists from Pakistan, Ilyas Kashmir, the Tehrik-e-Taliban Pakistan (Pakistan Taliban - TTP) and the Punjabi Taliban, a term used to describe the Punjab-based jihadi organizations that are opposed to, and fighting, the Pakistani state as well as the United States.

    The Pakistani intelligence findings on the Mehran attack clearly demonstrate that al-Qaeda and the TTP have teamed up with the Punjabi Taliban in recent years to form a triangular syndicate of militancy, with the aim to destabilize Pakistan, whose political and military leadership has been siding with "the forces of the infidel" in the "war against terror".

    Therefore, the al-Qaeda-Taliban alliance has gained an edge in Pakistan because of the support the local jihadi groups provide. Ideological ties bind al-Qaeda, the TTP and the Punjabi Taliban to throw out international forces from Afghanistan. These three jihadi entities share intelligence, human resources and training facilities, and empathize with each other as American and Pakistani forces - however strained the relationship between the two countries may be - hunt and target them. This was proven recently with the arrest of Mauritania, which was the result of collaboration between US and Pakistani intelligence agencies.

    The three organizations initially came together at the time the US invaded Afghanistan post-9/11, prompting al-Qaeda and the Afghan Taliban to rely on local partners such as Pakistani pro-Taliban tribes, anti-US and anti-Shi'ite groups like the Lashkar-e-Jhangvi (LeJ) and jihadi mercenaries in Pakistani religious seminaries and jihadi groups for shelter and assistance.

    The ties between local militant groups and al-Qaeda were cemented further as the Afghan Taliban's astonishing successes against the US-led allied forces prompted the US to increase drone attacks in the tribal areas and turn the heat on Pakistan to crack down on the TTP and others.

    However, this "axis of evil" remains an informal alliance that is mainly meant to protect and support each member. What gave the alliance a fillip was the migration of battle-hardened Pakistani commanders from the battlefront in Indian-administered Jammu and Kashmir to the Waziristan region of Pakistan.

    As things stand, the violence-wracked Waziristan region has become the new battlefield for the pro-Kashmir militants, who have already joined hands with the anti-US al-Qaeda elements. Information collected by Pakistani agencies shows the presence of fighters belonging to several pro-Kashmir jihadi groups, many of which have fallen out of favor with the Pakistani military and intelligence establishment, which is under tremendous pressure to stop harboring al-Qaeda-linked elements.

    These groups, which include the Harkatul Jihad-al-Islami, al-Badar, Jamaatul Furqaan and renegade elements of the Jaish-e-Mohammad and the Lashkar-e-Toiba, have strong connections with al-Qaeda in terms of operational collaboration and logistical support.

    Veteran jihadi commanders like Kashmiri, who was reportedly killed in June in a US drone attack, were the first to adopt al-Qaeda's ideology - that the weakening of the world's only superpower, the United States, is essential for the survival of the Muslim world.

    The death of Bin Laden was unquestionably a major blow to al-Qaeda. Yet, terrorism experts say long before he was killed, al-Qaeda had adapted itself to survive and operate without him, ensuring that the threat his terror network posed lived well beyond his demise.

    :shocked::shocked::shocked::shocked::shocked::whistle::whistle::whistle:


    Asia Times Online :: Al-Qaeda's roots grow deeper in Pakistan
     

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