Afghan-Soviet War from Soviets view and Stories.

Discussion in 'Defence & Strategic Issues' started by bhramos, Aug 25, 2009.

  1. bhramos

    bhramos Elite Member Elite Member

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    Afghan-Soviet War from Soviets view and Stories.

    I'm bringing all the Articles and Stories from Afghan-Soviet War.

    its my prespective. If the Soviets had won that war, we could have easily over taken Pak,

    Spetsnaz Special Ops Unit is a very successful & most feared by Mujjahidins

    i'm getting some of their stories,

    During Afghan war, the Afghan commanders, Rabbani and Hekmatiyar, set up a reward of 2 million dolllars for the heads of three spetsnaz commanders: Major Vitaly Bykov; Captain Sergey Breslavsky; and Major Yuriy Sapalov. That was 2 million dollars for each.

    Units under their command were the most feared ones. I had an honor to serve in the same unit with one of them.

    There was a famous operation which was executed by Breslavsky's unit. They were on a routine fly-over mission on a helicopter. Breslavsky ordered the pilot to land, and they went on foot towards what he thought was a possbile caravan path. But given the geographic features of Afghanistan, they soon realized they were 20km. deep in the Pakistani territory! Soon they spotted a base which was used as a training, and R&R facility for mujahedin. They decided to raid that base at night.

    When time came, they stormed the territory, literally slaughtering everyone inside. End result: 58 enemy soldiers dead, among them - 8 Pakistani, and 2 American instructors. Plus large amount of weapons (including "Stingers"), and ammo was destroyed.
    On our side: 2 slightly wounded. Overall there were 17 people in the unit.

    Afghanis called Breslavsky's unit (334th OO SpN) - Safed Shaitonon (White Devils).

    As for Kurbashi, you are talking about Major Hamid Halbaev from 154th OO SpN. He's of Uzbek nationality. His group was operating in Jelalabad region. He had this dangerous habit: at night, he alone quitely goes out on a "walk" dressed like a regular Afghan. He had only APSB and a knife. I know that he neutralized 24 mujahedin as a result of his regular "night walks". He mostly used his knife. Then the guy comes back after his "mission" falls asleep for only 2 hours, and then goes on a mission during daytime. Like a ****ing machine!

    Regards,
    16 OBr SpN
     
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  3. bhramos

    bhramos Elite Member Elite Member

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    Excerpt from an Article:

    Despite our continuous emphasis on security, on the need to prevent any Stingers or missiles reaching the enemy, the inevitable eventually happened. Twice, in early 1987, we lost Stingers, firstly to the Soviets, and then to the Iranian.
    We had trained a team destined to operate in the Kandahar area under the infamous Mulla Malang (‘the Butcher’). On his way back to his base of operations with three Stingers he was successfully ambushed by a Spetsnaz unit. Despite my personal briefing on how to move tactically and remain alerl, he managed to break all the rules of security. He put two grip-stocks and four missiles in his advance party, while he, with the remaining Stinger, followed some way behind with his main body. The advance party had halted and were caught napping by the Spetsnaz, who suddenly descended on the Mujahideen in helicopters. Far from being shot down, the gunships landed and disgorged the commandos who proceeded to kill or capture the entire group, with the exception of one man who escaped. The Soviets must have been well rewarded when they returned with such valuable booty.
    For months I hesitated to deploy Stingers in the provinces bordering Iran. There was a real risk of its being sold or given to the Iranians. However, after we knew the Soviets had captured some I decided to take the chance. I introduced the weapon to sensitive areas near Herat, Shindand and other suitable areas near the Iranian border. Tooran ismail of Jierat was the first Commander of this region to get Stingers through his deputy, former Colonel Alauddin, who came to Pakistan for training, and later escorted the missiles himself, Thereafter we selected a less important Commander from Khalis’ Party. After training, he was given two new vehicles and escorted up to the border, where he was briefed at length on the route he should take through Helinand Province. On no account was he to go into Iran. Inexcusably this Commander returned to Quetta after a short ourney into Afghanistan, on the pretext of collecting more weapons, leaving his party to continue without him. They had difficulty crossing the Helmand River and deviated from their intended route. Whether by accident or design they ended up being arrested in Iranian territory by the Passadars (Iranian Border Scouts). They had with them four Stinger launchers and sixteen missiles. Repeated efforts by Khalis and Rabbani, who had excellent contacts in Iran, failed to get them returned. The Iranian authorities never actually refused to give them back, they just kept delaying their release with one excuse or another. To this day we have never seen these missiles again. I do not know if it is generally known that Iran has had access to these weapons since 1987. I can only pray they never end up with a terrorist organization. Needless to say, it was the last time KhaIis got any Stingers while I remained in office.
     
  4. Officer of Engineers

    Officer of Engineers Defence Professionals Defence Professionals

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    I recognized the article, do you have the link?
     
  5. bhramos

    bhramos Elite Member Elite Member

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    sorry boss these articles were taken 4m other forum,
    i just wanted to post them in remembrance of great Soviets who could neutralize these Talibans inside Pak which even now US/NATO/ISAF couldn't do ,
    as these some others views in others view in other forum i dont have links of article,
     
  6. bhramos

    bhramos Elite Member Elite Member

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    hi boss more info


    SP: What impact did the introduction of Stingers have on Russian operations in general?
    Andrei: Well, it changed right away how helicopters and planes were flying. They would for example have a predetermined approach to the airport. You have to understand that most of the direct hits were on the low flying cargo planes that were about to land or take off. And on Mi-8 and Mi-6's while they were taking off or landing or while they were maneuvering, while they were handicapped, not while they were fully flying. Rarely were there any Mi-24's shot down, but there were some Mi-24's shot down. Also 25% of all so called shot down helicopters were actually hit but were then restored and put back in service. Impact was great of course, so they changed how they took off and landed, and installed heat decoys on them.


    SP: Some claim that the introduction of the Stinger in September of 1986 turned the War around for the Afghans and eventually enabled them to win. What are your thoughts on this?
    Andrei: Who claims that? The Afghans lost that war from the beginning until the last Soviet soldier left that land. They did not win any friggin operations other than successful ambushes. There was no success what so ever on their part militarily to speak of. It's like this, lets say this big guy takes this little guy and starts beating the snot out of him after school. And he beats him and beats him and beats him, to a pulp. Then he finally realizes that he's not achieving anything, the satisfaction is not there, this guy is not going to submit to him or whatever. So he comes off the guy and goes home, leaves. That's is what happened in Afghanistan . They did not force us to leave. There was no military success on their part that would cause, "Oh my God, retreat, retreat, retreat." No, there was nothing. Stingers, that were barely making it through and not all of them mind you, did not defeat the 100,000 fully equipped Soviet Army. The Soviet withdrawal was planned and in strict accordance with the Geneva Peace Accord that was signed by all the parties involved and it was planned and executed as a precise military operation, our garrisons leaving the country. Every one of our units was organized and marched across the border. And, like I said, in direct accordance with plans laid out by the Geneva Conference. So although Stingers did have an effect, they did change the flying patterns, they did have to come up with countermeasures, but Stingers DID NOT sway the war to Afghans rebels by any means. I means it's as simple as that. If someone said that, they are not military, or they slept through the entire academy. There was no military success (on the rebels part). There were some (Russian) operations that did not materialize as they planned due to poor planning on our part, and they became a little success for the rebels. But they were isolated instances that were very few. And the Stingers sure as hell didn't cause that.


    SP: So you think the effect of the Stinger on the outcome of the War was very minor?
    Andrei: Yeah of course. How can you with a shoulder held missile go against lets say a Grad artillery battery? OK lets say that there is a wing of 6 helicopters and you shot one down. What happens to you and your detachment? Four of the helicopters are gonna come down on you and your detachment with everything they've got. Cannons, bombs, rockets, and the other one is gonna pick up the downed crew. Think about it, they shot at only single, low flying, slow moving helicopters that don't mean ****. Not very often did they shoot one full of troops. Most of the planes shot down were slow moving transport planes, not Mig's. Stingers did not do ****. You can not fight the war on the ground with a shoulder held Stinger. You gotta have tanks, APC 's, you gotta have functional weapons, your supplies routes, your logistics have to be in order, your rear echelon has to be there. Not like hide your Chinese AK under your bed, wait and whip it out at night and go shoot some Shuravi (Russians). It's not gonna work that way. The Stingers, although they had an effect, but very minor, and sure as hell did not sway the war towards the rebels. The rebels did not win that war. And talking about Russia loosing after 1986 due to the Stingers, all you have to do is go on our web site (Afghanwar.ru - afghan war Resources and Information.) and see how many people were killed during those times. There was no increase in casualties. They were in-line with 1984 and 1985.


    SP: Was there any impact on SPETsNAZ operations from the introduction of Stingers?
    Andrei: No, everyone wanted to find one! There was an order across the ranks that anyone who captured a Stinger missile would immediately be awarded a Gold Star of the Hero of the Soviet Union . And in fact, I think there was an ambush against a Russian column or convoy, and it was successfully defended against and beaten off. And as a result of chasing the Muj back on top of the mountains they did find a Stinger missile. However when they started talking about who deserved to win the Gold Star and started looking into the background of the officers who took part in this operation they dug up things like they were an alcoholic, or were cheating on their wife or something. None had a clean slate. And they didn't want to give it to the regular soldier who found it, it was a scout I think. So as a result some guy in the rear echelon got it, "for providing logistical support".

    Again thanks to 16 OBr Spn
     
  7. musalman

    musalman پاکستان زنده باد

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    If they were that great why did they retreat?
     
  8. F-14

    F-14 Global Defence Moderator Senior Member

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    in a terrain like afghanistan the soviets were at an operational disadvantage sinces they were alien to the tarrain just like the americans in Nam it was a combination of factors that forced the USSR to withdraw like they say the won the battle but lost the war
     
  9. Officer of Engineers

    Officer of Engineers Defence Professionals Defence Professionals

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    The decision to withdraw was actually made a full 5 years before they actually did it. I don't know it if it is revisionism or the plain truth buit Moscow was never enthusastic about involvement in Afghanistan.

    They've assigned only one Army, the 58th, to the task when SOP required 3 Armies.

    Also, Brezhnev lacked the nerve what Stalin would have done and that was to get rid of the Afghans, ie ship them out of Afghanistan.

    Clearly, given the history of the USSR and the Russian Empire, the Kremlin, and Brezhnev could not have been ignorant of what was required to subdue Afghanistan.

    Also, clearly, Moscow did not carry out what was required.
     
  10. shravan

    shravan Regular Member

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    The bear trap: Afghanistan's untold story
    By Mohammad Yousaf, Mark Adkin

    Link
     
  11. Blademaster

    Blademaster Regular Member

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    If Stalin was still alive, supposed he got a miracle drug allowing him to live for 40 more years and impervious to poison, he would have done as you suggested? I think that it was fortous for USSR that Stalin had died because he would have ruled USSR to its grave. It was only because of Khuskenov and Gorbachev's efforts that USSR was allowed several decades of life. If Brezhnev had not overthrew Khuskenov, Khuskenov would have overturned many policies of Stalin and do a Deng Peng thing.
     
  12. bhramos

    bhramos Elite Member Elite Member

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    some more info

    In Afghanistan, the Alfa's orders were: investigation of structures, location, intentions of mujahideen, capture and liquidation of the leaders of mujahideen, search and destruction of warehouses of the weapon and ammunition, army headquarters and signal centers, search and rescue soldiers from captivity, help of the Afghani army in organization of subversive groups. Their first goal, however, was an assault on the palace Dar-ul-aman.

    The palace of Amin had been built on an elevated area, which provided an excellent 360-degree view of the surrounding area. This three story building featured extremely well constructed walls (23mm shells from ADV-vehicles could not penetrate these walls). There was only one road into the palace, which was under constant watch by palace security personnel. The palace complex typically housed approximately 2,000 guards, with the barracks of the guards located on the third story of the palace. On the 27th of December, however, only 200 guards were present. They were reinforced by eleven tanks, two of which were dug in at the gate to the palace.

    Near the palace grounds there was also a general Afghanistan Army headquarters building with its own complement of soldiers and an air defense system. Approximately 500 meters from the palace was also a building housing a regiment of gendarmeries (police).

    For the assault, Alfa's soldiers were divided into two groups, "Grom" (Thunder) and "Zenith". Thunder was composed of 25 men, two ADV vehicles with the ZSU 23-4 "Shilka", six BTR-60's and six BMP-1's. Zenith was composed of 24 KGB men. The moslem batallion is other subdivision, which provided only cover of assault and consist of conscripted soldiers.

    The sign for the start of the operation was the explosive destruction of a signal center in the city of Kabul. When this happened, the Shilka's opened fire on the palace. Thunder group on BMP's then moved towards the palace. Zenith also moved forward via a foot ladder towards the palace.

    To prevent reinforcements from approaching from the opposite side, and to prevent any palace guards from escaping, the Muslim Battalion opened fire with two Shilkas (normally used for anti-aircraft duties) then opened up, providing devastating fire. Simultaneously, a smaller team designated "Carandoy" (made up of personnel from Thunder, Zenith, and an airborne unit) assaulted and captured the Ministry of Foreign Business in Kabul. Two soldiers from Thunder along with a platoon of paratroopers also captured the Afghanistan Air Force Staff. Four men from Thunder and Zenith then commandeered the two tanks at the front of the palace and captured the gendarmerie post.

    As the BTR's and BMP's began to advance, however, they were taken under heavy automatic weapons and antitank fire. One of Zenith's BTR's was destroyed and caught fire, and one of Thunder's BMP's was so severely damaged that she had to be abandoned.

    In the first two minutes after the teams left their armored vehicles, thirteen soldiers from Thunder were wounded. Despite this, massed fire overwhelmed the palace guards and Alfa made entry into the place itself. The Shilkas continued to fire at the second story, as Afghan guards tossed hand grenades and opened fire with a machine gun. As the Alfa soldiers made their way upstairs, they used their own grenades to eliminate the Afghans. Once on the second story, the soldiers lobbed grenades into each room. Amin was in his study when a grenade exploded, killing him. Some more fighting ensued, but shortly thereafter, Alfa had successfully taken the palace and set up defenses.

    By the time the assault was over, nearly all of the assault personnel had been injured. One soldier lost a hand while approaching a ladder to the second story, while another took a round through the neck. Others received bullet and fragmentation wounds to the stomach, legs, and hands. At least five Alfa soldiers were killed. In the morning, the Vitebsk parachute division landed at the airport at Bagram City and the invasion of Afghanistan was underway.
     
  13. pmaitra

    pmaitra Moderator Moderator

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    Soviet Paratroopers ambush Mujahideen

     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 10, 2015

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