A Global Shift in Foreign Aid, Starting in India

Discussion in 'Economy & Infrastructure' started by santosh10, Oct 10, 2014.

  1. santosh10

    santosh10 Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2014
    Messages:
    1,666
    Likes Received:
    174
    Location:
    Lucknow
    A Global Shift in Foreign Aid, Starting in India
    November 15, 2012

    Britain’s decision to stop giving development aid to India by 2015 marks a turning point in the former colonial power’s relations with New Delhi, and is raising questions about the global future of foreign aid in a fast-changing economic world order.

    “Having visited India I have seen firsthand the tremendous progress being made,” the British development secretary, Justine Greening, said Nov. 9, while announcing the end of more than 50 years of aid to India. “India is successfully developing, and our own bilateral relationship has to keep up with 21st century India,” she said.

    Britain’s move may be just the first in a full-scale pullback of aid to faster-growing developing nations, some aid professionals believe.

    “There is a real concern that all the major donors are looking at excluding emerging economies from their aid programs,” Emma Seery, the head of development finance at Oxfam, said by telephone. “These countries have large pockets of poverty, and we are afraid that this trend will remove this extra lifeline from the poorest,” she said.

    For decades, the United Nations has urged developed countries to spend 0.7 percent of their national income on aid to poorer nations, a target that continues to be elusive. According to the most recent figures of the Development Assistance Committee, a consortium of the world’s main donors, the developed world gave nearly $120 billion in assistance to the developing world in 2009, or 0.32 percent.

    The United States, which doled out some $30 billion in 2010, leads the pack.

    But many traditional donors are now openly reconsidering the need for, and role of, foreign aid. The United States, for example, facing a budget crisis, has considered proposals to significantly trim the billions in foreign aid it gives. “The proposals have raised the spectre of deep cuts in food and medicine for Africa, in relief for disaster-affected places like Pakistan and Japan, in political and economic assistance for the new democracies of the Middle East, and even for the Peace Corps,” Steven Lee Myers wrote in The New York Timeslast year.

    U.S. aid to India, targeted toward clean energy, food security and health, has dropped 25 percent in recent years, from nearly $127 million in 2010 to a proposed $98.3 million in 2013. India’s emergence as a regional and global power, the 2012 annual letterfrom the U.S. Agency for International Development said, “creates an opportunity to evolve the traditional donor recipient model of development into a true partnership.”

    This threatened drought of Western aid comes as some emerging market countries, including India, have themselves become donors to more impoverished countries.

    Before a visit this week from President Hamid Karzai of Afghanistan, aimed at wooing investment, India approved development projects in Afghanistan to the tune of $100 million as part of India’s $2 billion aid package to the war-torn country. In 2010, the country extended a $1 billion line of credit to Bangladesh, the highest ever one-time assistance, and last year, it offered $5 billion in credit to African nations. With a broadening aid portfolio, New Delhi recently announced plans to set up its own aid agency.:ranger:

    For India, once the world’s largest foreign aid recipient, with some $55 billion funneled to the country between 1951 and 1992, the change from recipient to donor comes as the country tries to redefine its role in the international community.

    For decades, as India made its haphazard transition from being a British colony to an economic powerhouse, it depended heavily on aid from prosperous nations and international institutions. In 1958, for instance, Britain offered India some ₤40 million in foreign aid, as India struggled to build a nation and implement its second five-year economic plan. British Treasury officials referred to the “long-term problems of Indian development” when announcing the package.

    Sixty years later, Britain’s decision to pull the plug on funding to India was met with little more than a shrug by India’s political class. “We don’t really need the aid,” P. Chidambaram, the finance minister, said last week. “We have accepted it in the past, but I think both countries have agreed that we can emphasize on trade rather than aid.”

    Part of the reason for such nonchalance, analysts say, is that British aid to India, which amounts to $450 million per year and is used primarily in health care and education, is small. Last year, the finance minister at the time, Pranab Mukherjee, reportedlydismissed the funds as “peanuts” compared to India’s own spending. (Mr. Mukherjee is now the president of India.)

    Indeed, in recent years, India has ramped up its spending on social welfare programs, including a large rural employment scheme and a food subsidy system, aimed at lifting its millions out of poverty.

    But perhaps more significant is the fact that India now sees – and projects – itself as a global power and a partner to developed nations like Britain, rejecting the traditional model of rich nations aiding poor ones. “Aid is past, trade is future,” Foreign Minister Salman Khurshid recently said.

    This ambition stems from the Indian economy, which, even with a recent slackening, continues to grow at a faster rate than other large economies. In 2007, the World Bank moved India to a “lower middle income” country from a “low income” one. But, activists point out, it continues to be a country of rampant poverty and vast inequities. Despite two decades of growth, over 400 million people in India live on less than $1.25 a day, and the country’s malnutrition figures are among the worst in the world. India has had some success with its welfare programs, but it spends only 0.9 percent of gross domestic product on health care, among the lowest in the world, and 3 percent on education.

    This dichotomy appears to be in tune with global trends in poverty. A 2010 study by economist Andy Sumner at the Institute of Development Studies titled “The New Bottom Billion” found that two decades ago, 93 percent of the world’s poorest lived in low-income countries. Now, nearly three-quarters of them, or one billion people, live in middle-income economies.

    Economists at the Asian Development Bank, too, speak of a “middle income trap,” where rapid growth in short periods of time is followed by economic stagnation. While India is growing fast, said RanaHasan, ADB’s principal economist in India, “historical record tells us this is not the time to disengage.”

    In recent years, ADB, which focuses primarily on infrastructure projects in India, has moved its focus from large nationwide projects such as highways and power grids to development projects in “lagging” states, like Bihar, Chattisgarh and Assam.

    British aid in India, said Ms. Seery of Oxfam, has a “real and significant impact,” and its withdrawal could have significant negative repercussions for its poorest. It has played a major role, she said, in India’s successful drive to eliminate polio, and it continues to help children attend primary schools and to give women and children access to good health care. “The decision to unaid,” Ms. Seery said, “was too hasty from a development perspective.”

    Some Indian analysts argue that the decision has less to do with India’s development than Britain’s own political and economic compulsions. In recent years, Britain has become home to a strong anti-aid sentiment, with a section of the political class arguing that India, which has its own space program, no longer needs aid from Britain, itself in the throes of an economic slowdown.

    In a poll by The Guardian newspaper, which asked if Britain should stop granting aid to India “in response to its former colony’s ‘rapid growth and development progress’ over the past decade,” 89 percent responded in the affirmative.

    Others say Britain’s new approach stems from the absence of quid pro quo. Last year, India’s decision to select a French company over its British rival for a multi-billion dollar contract to supply fighter planes caused great furor in London, with several British politicians saying India ought to have favored the British company on account of the millions it receives in aid from Britain.

    “They believe that British aid must get a bang for its buck, which means it must spread British influence,” said JayatiGhosh, a professor of economics at Jawaharlal National University in New Delhi. “The aid is just not doing that anymore.”

    A Global Shift in Foreign Aid, Starting in India - NYTimes.com

    http://india.blogs.nytimes.com/2012...=true&_type=blogs&_php=true&_type=blogs&_r=1&

    http://india.blogs.nytimes.com/2012...=true&_type=blogs&_php=true&_type=blogs&_r=1&
     
  2.  
  3. santosh10

    santosh10 Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2014
    Messages:
    1,666
    Likes Received:
    174
    Location:
    Lucknow
    India doles out Rs 26bn aid grant to Bhutan
    17 March 2012

    At the 2012 budget presentation in the Indian parliament, the Indian finance minister, Pranab Mukherjee yesterday said Rs 2,638 crore or about Nu 26bn has been kept aside as aid for Bhutan.

    Last year, the Indian government provided Nu 20bn in aid to Bhutan.

    Amidst an ongoing rupee crisis, this Nu 26bn which will come to the country as development aid is expected to ease rupee shortage in the country. The government is expecting the budget to be released by the Indian government during the month of April this year.

    Finance minister LyonpoWangdiNorbu during a press conference earlier said that he is expecting the money to be released after the Indian budget presentation is over.

    Business Bhutan also learnt that the finance secretary Lam Dorji and acting foreign minister LyonpoKhanduWangchuk at the sidelines of Mangdechhu hydropower project meeting were supposed to meet the Indian finance minister to discuss about the release of the budget and also initiate talks to increase the standby credit line from Rs 3bn to Rs 6bn.

    While the Royal Monetary Authority is desperately trying to rein in rupee shortage in the country by means of monetory tools, the government apart from using the fiscal tool is heavily depending on aid from India.

    So far, the Indian government has committed a total of Rs 34bn, of which Rs 7bn has already been allocated for small development programs.

    Earlier the finance minister explained that since the money committed was not been disbursed on time, the government incurred expenditure of Nu 1.5bn for the small development program which further fuelled rupee depletion.

    The Indian government will soon replace the amount. “If this money comes, we will be better off,†said LyonpoWangdiNorbu.

    The prime minister and the finance minister were not available for comments.

    An economist Business Bhutan talked to however asked, “For how long Bhutan will depend on aids from India which will only be a short term measure to deal with the current situation of rupee shortage?â€

    He said Bhutan needs to look beyond India in terms of trade and investment with countries like Thailand, Bangladesh and Nepal.

    The government is also expecting inflow of rupee once the grant and loans from India for hydropower projects like Sunkosh, Mangdechhu and four other joint ventures embarks. :india:

    Business Bhutan - Nations only Financial Newspaper
     
    sorcerer and Srinivas_K like this.
  4. santosh10

    santosh10 Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2014
    Messages:
    1,666
    Likes Received:
    174
    Location:
    Lucknow
    Amid slowdown, India ramps up aid for neighbours
    Mar 18, 2012

    NEW DELHI: A difficult economic situation notwithstanding, India will be stepping up its assistance programme to its neighbouring countries in the coming fiscal.

    The biggest chunk of India's assistance programme is reserved for Afghanistan, Myanmar and Bhutan that are provided for in the 12th five-year Plan. But under the non-plan head, Bhutan takes the largest chunk with a combined loan-grant amount of Rs 1,500 crore. Bhutan has traditionally been the largest recipient of Indian aid, with massive hydro-electric projects being covered in the Plan expenditure. :thumb:

    Afghanistan and Myanmar are big recipients, both strategically vital for India's security and economic interests. India has invested heavily in infrastructure projects in Afghanistan, including roads, parliament buildings and capacity building for the Afghans in various fields. India also runs the biggest children's hospital in Kabul.

    However, recently, India won the Hajigak iron ore mines that will necessitate building several roads connecting the mines to border points. A new component of India's aid package to Afghanistan is in the security sector. As a result of the strategic partnership agreement with Afghanistan last year, India is committed to training and equipping Afghan national security forces. This will include training programmes, to be mainly held in India.

    New Delhi is building a multi-modal transport system in Myanmar that could also serve to improve trade with the country that India now regards as the gateway to south-east Asia. :truestory:

    Other countries that will continue to receive Indian aid this fiscal is Sri Lanka, where India has invested in rehabilitation and rebuilding programmes in the north, railway lines and oil terminals as well as building houses for the internally displaced persons from the Tamil regions. Bangladesh also takes a sizeable chunk of Rs 250 crore after the PM announced a $1-billion credit line for the country in 2010.

    Bafflingly, the government spends a minuscule amount for "energy security" in the MEA, but it's so small that it's unclear what this would be used for. Equally strangely, Mongolia gets Rs 2 crore this year from India, but the reason for that remains unclear.

    Amid slowdown, India ramps up aid for neighbours - Times Of India

    Amid slowdown, India ramps up aid for neighbours - The Times of India
     
    Srinivas_K likes this.
  5. Free Karma

    Free Karma Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2013
    Messages:
    2,372
    Likes Received:
    2,576
    Location:
    Chennai
    Hello....10 :D

    These articles are all old...like from 2012.
     
    santosh10 likes this.
  6. santosh10

    santosh10 Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2014
    Messages:
    1,666
    Likes Received:
    174
    Location:
    Lucknow
    India’s foreign aid program catches up with its global ambitions

    Citing its newfound economic strength, India revealed plans to reorient its positioning in the aid community just over a decade ago.

    “A stage has come in our development where we should now, firstly, review our dependence on external donors. Second, extend support to the national efforts of other developing countries,” said then-Indian Finance Minister Jaswant Singh in February 2003. :india:

    Since then, India’s ambition of transitioning from aid recipient to donor hasn’t panned out completely. Despite its increasingly dismissive posture toward Western aid donors, the Indian government still receives billions of dollars in foreign aid money each year. In 2011, India’s official development assistance to gross national income ratio stood at 0.2 percent, on a par with Egypt and Angola and up from 0.1 percent in 2003.

    Yet even as India remains among the largest recipients of foreign aid, the country has come a long way toward bolstering its standing as an emerging donor. In its latest budget unveiled in February, the Indian government set aside nearly $1.3 billion for foreign assistance in 2013-14, a fourfold jump from 2003-04. Over the past four years, Indian foreign aid spending has grown annually by an average 32 percent.

    [​IMG]

    Much like its BRICS peers, New Delhi is keen on enhancing its global reputation through its foreign aid program. Experts on Indian foreign assistance have told Devex that India is likely to continue ramping up aid spending despite fiscal pressures brought about by its recent economic slowdown.

    “The intensity, volume and scope of [Indian] aid giving has remained immune from the government’s austerity drives which have reduced the spending power of various ministries,” ShanthieMariet D’Souza, a research fellow with the Institute of South Asian Studies at the National University of Singapore, pointed out.

    Some members of the parliament in New Delhi have been less confident of the Indian foreign aid program’s budgetary position. Just last month, a standing committee of India’s lower house of parliament warned that the Ministry of External Affairs’ budget was no longer commensurate with its foreign aid and diplomatic activities.

    Technical cooperation continues to account for the bulk of Indian foreign assistance. In 2012-13, Indian spending on technical cooperation activities reached $589 million, representing 58 percent of the country’s foreign aid budget. The Indian government also makes sizeable contributions to multilateral organizations, including the U.N. Development Program and the World Health Organization. :india:

    USAID-style aid agency delayed yet again

    In 2007, Indian Finance Minister P. Chidambaram announced the government’s intention to establish a full-fledged Indian aid agency. But despite repeated pronouncements from New Delhi in the years since, the agency that would have been modeled after the U.S. Agency for International Development has yet to materialize.

    New Delhi’s aid program is mostly under the purview of the Ministry of External Affairs, which taps specialists from within its ranks and across the Indian government to carry out its programming. India has also channeled its aid money through other ministries, however, including the Ministry of Finance and the Ministry of Defense. The proposed USAID-style aid agency would have consolidated the administration of Indian foreign aid activities under one roof.

    In January 2012, the Indian government launched a coordinating and monitoring body for Indian foreign assistance within the Ministry of External Affairs called the Development Partnership Administration. DweepChanana, an expert on Indian foreign aid who is currently a director with UBS’ philanthropic division, told Devex the DPA could eventually evolve into a full-fledged aid agency.

    Yet while the creation of the DPA is widely acknowledged as a positive step for the decentralized and fragmented Indian aid program, many observers caution the Indian foreign aid and diplomacy apparatus remains woefully understaffed.

    Thus far, the Ministry of External Affairs has assigned only 20 staff members to the DPA. Moreover, the ministry’s overstretched diplomatic corps of 900 foreign service officers — roughly equal to that of Singapore — is raising valid questions over India’s ability to engage effectively with its development partners overseas. New Delhi is increasingly looking to its diplomatic missions to appraise funding requests from other governments.

    “This is a general problem for India’s foreign service. There are not enough diplomats,” Chanana asserted.

    Focus close to home

    In line with its status as a regional power, India has been a leading aid donor to its smaller neighbors Bhutan and Nepal since the 1950s. The two countries have historically received the lion’s share of Indian foreign assistance.

    India’s economic considerations for its aid program are on display in Bhutan, where its assistance focuses on developing the hydropower sector. The Indian government openly acknowledges that it intends to buy back much of the electricity generated through its hydropower assistance to the country. In 2012-13, Bhutan claimed 36 percent ($213 million) of India’s technical cooperation spending.

    Meanwhile, small-scale development projects in Nepal’s health and education sectors have emerged as priority investments for Indian foreign aid. Nepal received 8 percent ($49 million) of India’s technical cooperation budget in 2012-13.

    And in a development that has been strongly encouraged by the United States, Afghanistan has rapidly moved up the Indian aid agenda since the fall of the Taliban regime in 2001. Now the second-largest recipient of Indian foreign aid after Bhutan, Afghanistan garnered 15 percent ($89 million) of Indian technical cooperation spending in 2012-13. A new parliament building in Kabul, a hydroelectric dam in Herat province as well as community-level development initiatives are among the projects backed by the Indian government.

    Polls suggest India’s aid program in Afghanistan has been generally well-received by Afghans — perhaps no surprise given the two countries’ long-standing cultural ties. As Afghanistan braces for reduced aid levels in light of the NATO drawdown, there are some signs demand for Indian development engagement is growing in the country.

    “When I visited Jalalabad, the TV station manager wanted more of India’s assistance in training of local journalists … In Kandahar, women at an Indian medical facility wanted more medical help,” D’Souza said to Devex as she recounted her recent field visits to Afghanistan.

    The Indian government emphasizes that its aid activities in Afghanistan and elsewhere are demand-driven, a claim which has been supported to some extent by Indian aid experts, including D’Souza.

    Expanding to Africa

    Yet even as much of India’s aid money remains close to home, India has also extended the reach of its assistance well beyond South Asia. In large part through its deputation of technical experts abroad, the Indian aid program now spans more than 60 countries in Asia, Africa and Latin America. :ranger:

    India has been particularly keen on expanding its aid engagement with Africa. In 2012-13, African countries received 7 percent ($43 million) of India’s technical cooperation budget, up from 4 percent in 2011-12. The emerging donor stresses its willingness to share lessons from its own development with Africa.

    “India will work with Africa to realize its vast potential … We do not have all the answers but we have some experience in nation building which we are happy to share with our African brothers and sisters,” Indian Prime Minister Manmohan Singh told African heads of state attending the second India-Africa Forum Summit in Addis Ababa in 2011.

    In Addis Ababa, Singh committed $700 million in assistance to establish educational institutions and training programs across Africa, including in Uganda, Ghana, Botswana and Burundi. The Indian prime minister also announced $5 billion in lines of credit — largely tied to the purchase of Indian goods and services — to African countries. The Indian government is expected to make further aid commitments for the continent at the third India-Africa Forum Summit in the summer of 2014.

    The Indian aid program has already drawn upon its strengths in the ICT sector to create Africa’s largest tele-education and telemedicine initiative, the $125 million Pan-African e-Network. Kicked off in 2006, India’s flagship aid initiative in the continent now connects 47 African countries with leading schools and hospitals in India through satellite and fiber-optic links.

    Devex.com
    May 13, 2013

    India’s foreign aid program catches up with its global ambitions | Asia
     
  7. santosh10

    santosh10 Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2014
    Messages:
    1,666
    Likes Received:
    174
    Location:
    Lucknow
    India gives $5-billion aid to Africa :india:

    India loosened its pursestring to woo Africa on Tuesday with Prime Minister Manmohan Singh announcing a multi-billion dollar in aid while inaugurating the second India-Africa Forum Summit in the capital of Ethiopia. :ranger:

    Amid thunderous applause from the leaders and representatives of 15 African countries at the African Union headquarters in Addis Ababa, Singh announced a line of credit worth $5 billion "to help achieve the development goals of Africa". "There is a new economic growth story emerging from Africa. Africa possesses all the prerequisites to become a major growth pole of the worldâ€Â¦ India will work with Africa to realise its vast potentialâ€Â¦ It is in this spirit that I wish to outline some initiatives for the consideration of our African partners," Singh said on the eve of Africa Day.

    The $5.4 billion aid offered at the first Summit in Delhi in 2008 focused on regional integration through infrastructure development. Singh said, "I believe we have reason to be satisfied with what we have achieved since 2008. But our people expect much more and we have to work hard to deliver on these expectations.

    He also offered an additional $700 million to establish new institutions and training programmes in consultation with the African Union and its institutions. There was also support for the development of a new Ethiopia-Djibouti Railway line to the tune of $300 million. :thumb:

    Unlike China capacity building has been India's focus in Africa over decades. It may be recalled that half of the Cabinet in an erstwhile Ethiopian government had studied or were trained in India. The area of capacity building has been New Delhi's strength and Singh once again did not disappoint his African counterparts.

    He announced creation of several new institutions at the Pan African level across various sectors - food, textile, weather forecasting, life and earth sciences and agriculture and rural development. :truestory:

    African students are a common sight in Indian cities be it Bangalore, Pune, Mumbai, Delhi or Kolkata. To encourage them further government announced that an India-Africa virtual university will be set up to meet the demands among Africans for higher studies in Indian institutions. :thumb:

    Towards this end 10,000 new scholarships will be offered under the proposed university.


    The PM also announced an increase by 900 training slots for the Africans under the Indian Technical and Economic Cooperation (ITEC). Therefore a total of 2500 training positions under ITEC will be offered for the next three years to the Africans and total scholarships offered during the same period will amount to 22,000. :truestory:

    At the bilateral level, it was also proposed to establish institutes for English language training, information technology, entrepreneurship development and vocational training across African countries. And as part of new initiatives in the social and economic sectors India will also establish rural technology parks, food testing laboratories, food processing business incubation centres and centres on geo- informatics applications and rural development. :ranger:

    In order to bring together business leaders from both sides and deepen trade ties, an India- Africa business council will be set up. :thumb:

    A strong votary of peace building in Africa for decades that would lead to prosperity, India made yet another key announcement.

    Singh said, "I am happy to announce that India will contribute $2 million for the African Union Mission in Somalia." Stability in the Horn of Africa, as Somalia is known, is also key in addressing the menace of piracy, of which India has been a victim.
    Air connectivity has been a bottleneck between Indian cities and African nations.

    This has not helped in increasing peopleto- people contacts. Acknowledging this, PM said, "One of the biggest gaps in our interaction is that of insufficient air connectivityâ€Â¦ To begin with, India would be happy to increase the access of African airlines to Indian cities in a significant manner over the next three years."

    India on its part sought Africa's support for its bid for a permanent seat in the UN Security Council.

    "The current international economic and political situation is far from favourable, particularly for developing countries... The world faces new challenges in assuring food and energy security. Global institutions of governance are outmoded and under stress," Singh said.

    African nations had overwhelmingly voted for India in the election for non permanent seat at the UN. The continent also hopes to get two slots in the expanded Security Council.

    India gives $5-billion aid to Africa : Rest of the World, News - India Today
     
    AVERAGE INDIAN and Srinivas_K like this.
  8. santosh10

    santosh10 Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2014
    Messages:
    1,666
    Likes Received:
    174
    Location:
    Lucknow
    Poor Little Rich Country
    BY PATRICK FRENCH | JUNE 24, 2011

    How do you categorize India, a nation that is at once fantastically wealthy and desperately poor?

    [​IMG]

    In May, the Indian government announced that it was giving $5 billion in aid to African countries in the interest of helping them meet their development goals. "We do not have all the answers," Prime Minister Manmohan Singh said, "but we have some experience in nation-building, which we are happy to share."

    The British could be forgiven for being annoyed with Singh's largesse. Britain, after all, currently gives more than $450 million a year in aid to India, and has plans to continue doing so for at least the next few years. The British economy is bumping in and out of a recession, while India's gross domestic product is growing at more than 8 percent a year. This has put the British government in the rather bizarre position of having to sell bonds in order to donate money to Asia's second-fastest-growing economy, even as the latter is itself getting into the philanthropy business.

    The policy is unpopular with most of the British press, which argues that because India has a space program and some flamboyant billionaires, it does not need aid -- especially when Britain cannot really afford it. (When the Labour government was voted out at last year's general election, the departing Finance Minister Liam Byrne left a one-line note on his desk for his successor: "I'm afraid there is no money." It was a joke -- but it was also true.) Nevertheless, Britain still sees itself as a donor nation, with all the obligations and international prestige that entails. This comes in part from a sense of postcolonial guilt: Prime Minister David Cameron spoke recently of a "sense of duty to help others" and the "strong moral case" for giving aid.

    The situation suggests just how dramatically the economic rise of Asia has undone centuries of experience, and the expectation that the West will retain the hegemony it has had for the past 400 years. It is increasingly difficult to classify whether a nation is rich or poor, and terms such as "the Global South" and "the Third World" have to be heavily qualified to take into account the fact that large sections of the population in countries like China, Brazil, and India now have a purchasing power matching that of people in "the West."

    In 1951, the American diplomat Bill Bullitt described the condition of India in Life magazine: "An immense country containing 357 million people," he wrote, "with enormous natural resources and superb fighting men, India can neither feed herself nor defend herself against serious attacks. An inhabitant of India lives, on average, 27 years. His annual income is about $50. About 90 out of 100 Indians cannot read or write. They exist in squalor and fear of famine." Today, it would be hard to make such an absolute statement about India. Poverty certainly remains a chronic problem, but it exists alongside pockets of substantial wealth. An Indian's life expectancy at birth now stands at 67 years, and continues to rise. It is necessary perhaps to think in a different way, and to see that a country like India, like Schrödinger's cat, exists in at least two forms simultaneously: rich and poor. :ranger:

    The most important change of the last two decades, since the beginning of economic liberalization, has been the transformation of middle-class Indian aspiration. Although the stagnant days of the controlled economy and the "Permit Raj" -- when important decisions depended on a bureaucrat's authorization -- had their own stability, they also stifled opportunity and individual talent. Members of the professional middle class frequently preferred to seek their fortune in more meritocratic societies abroad.

    The modern Indian middle class has a new chance to shape its own destiny in a way that was not previously possible. You can move to your own house using a home loan and live outside the joint family; you can buy a car that is not an Ambassador or a Fiat; you can travel abroad and see how people in other countries live; you can watch your politicians accept bribes or dance with prostitutes on television in local media sting operations while surfing your way to Desperate Housewives or KaunBanegaCrorepati, an Indian adaptation of Who Wants to Be a Millionaire? Businesspeople who have succeeded on their own merits overseas, such as PepsiCo CEO IndraNooyi, are presented as national heroes.

    Poor Little Rich Country
     
  9. santosh10

    santosh10 Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2014
    Messages:
    1,666
    Likes Received:
    174
    Location:
    Lucknow
    .
    i have prepared a post regarding changing India as below, which may have a place here too, i think :thumb:


    => Literacy Rate

    here the comparison is based on 347 million population in 1947 to 1.25 billion people by 2013. here we find, Youth Literacy Rate might have reached 90%+ by 2014, as we had almost 95%+ attendance of kids in schools since 1997

    => Per Capita Income of India

    Considering the method which was in application till 2006, by both World Bank and IMF

    British Left around 2% to 5% rich and rest poor in 1947, out of total 347 million population in 1947, while we now have around 350 million Middle Class of India whose Per Capita Income is well over $20,000+ on PPP now, similar to Very High HDI countries like Argentina, Poland, Saudi Arabia etc

    We have new GDP Per Capita on PPP calculation for India by 2013, as below:

    now poverty of India is because of its over population. Most of the problems of India is because of its Over Population and India has to reduce its population only. otherwise India has around 350mil Upper Middle Class, more than total population in 1947, whose per capita income on PPP is similar to the Very High HDI countries like Argentina, Poland, Saudi Arabia etc. one day I calculated as below:-

    first, we find GDP on PPP of India was $5.2tn in 2013 but its still manipulated by the US/UK since 2007. as, till 2006, we had a different way of measuring GDP on PPP which used to include estimated undocumented part of GDP also. and I remember, this way GDP of high population 'developing' countries was around 50% to 80% higher, and for the middle order countries like Brazil/Turkey it was around 10% to 25% higher. and for the developed nations, the difference was hardly around 1% to 3% by that "Old Method" which was in application till 2006, by IMF and World Bank both. like as below:
    means, GDP of India on PPP was already $5.16tn in 2007, higher than Japan that year, making it the 3rd Largest Economy on PPP by 2007 itself this way.

    again we have India's growth rate since 2007 as below:

    India GDP Annual Growth Rate | 1951-2014 | Data | Chart | Calendar

    here we find, "Average Growth Rate" of India from first quarter of 2008 till the December quarter 2012, stood at around 7.6%, on 'annual' basis. hence considering GDP on PPP of India at $5.16tn in 2007 by Old Method as above, with the estimated 5.0% growth by 2013, we may calculate its value by 2013, after 6 years since early 2008, as below:

    GDP on PPP of India by end 2012 = 5.16*1.076*1.076*1.076*1.076*1.076*1.05= $7.81 trillion on PPP

    but we would also get to know that PPP value consider value of goods and services in US$ term, means we would also include the factor of inflation of United States also. and if we consider average 2.0% inflation of US for these 6 year in between early 2008 to 2013, with considering an overall factor of just 1.12 this way, then GDP on PPP of India comes around = 7.81* 1.12= $8.75tn by 2013. and it still hasn't included 'Value Added' effects........

    again, we know that share of agriculture would be around 17.0% in India's GDP in 2013. therefore, we find share of agriculture in indian economy, 0.17 * 8.75= $1.5 trillions (around), on which 50% population of india is dependent. means around 600mil people based on agriculture in india have per capita income around = $2,500 on PPP by 2013 this way, which is itself similar to the better side of Lower Order Countries like Bangladesh.....
    this way, 8.75 - 1.50 = $7.25tn is left for rest of 600mil people based in industry and service in India, with per capita income of around $12,100 on PPP which is higher than Middle Order Countries like Brazil, South Africa etc..........

    https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook//rankorder/2004rank.html


    again, we have news that 25% of the population of cities are either in slum or in bit better condition only. so we would consider per capita income of 300mil living in cities in low condition at hardly $3,000 which takes a share of $900 billion from its GDP. hence we are then left with around 7.25 - 0.9 = $6.35 trillions for the rest of 300 mil people living in cities, the so called Middle Class of India with per capita income around $21,166 on PPP this way.

    but it is estimated that out of total 600mil people based in agriculture sector, it also has around 50mil Lower Middle Class with Per Capita Income around $15,000 on PPP. (as we know that agriculture has higher share of 'undocumented' part of GDP. with that, Agriculture also has higher share of non-taxable business of India.) Hence, we find total middle class of India around 350mil with per capita income around $20,000+ on PPP which is similar to Very High HDI countries like Argentina, Poland etc, which is more than total population of India at the time of freedom in 1947 :thumb:

     
    Last edited: Oct 12, 2014
  10. santosh10

    santosh10 Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2014
    Messages:
    1,666
    Likes Received:
    174
    Location:
    Lucknow
    The Industrialized India

    ; India has now entered among the Newly Industrialized nations as below:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Newly_industrialized_country#Current_NICs

    India had overall 5.81% growth rate since 1951.....
    We now have Industrialists as below too, who are building the nation. as we do know that our these honored Super Riches/ Billionaires don't have money in pocket, but they are Industrialists/ billionaires in terms of the industries they have to provide employment, generating taxes for the government which government use to help the common public itself, along with improving production line hence reducing cost of products, with introducing new technologies too through their industries, hence building the nation this way.... :india:

    The report as below, mention around 115 Billionaires in India, as compare to hardly around 60 by Forbes. its because Forbes estimate only Share values, while the report as below includes, "shares in public and private companies, residential and investment properties, art collections, planes, cash and other assets, according to Wealth-X...".
    World's Billionaire Club Grows; Ultra Millionaires Lose Money - WORLD PROPERTY JOURNAL Global News Center

    and here is the main report, as below.....
    Wealth-X World Ultra Wealth Report 2011-2012 | Wealth-X


    Further to the above talks, BRIC economies as whole have their UHNWI estimate, with India's at around 8,200, is given in the article as below: :thumb:


    => BRIC Country Super-Rich Worth $4 Trillion

    The future of wealth will be built with BRICs.

    According to new data from Wealth-X, the wealth research and consulting firm, Brazil, Russia, India and China now have a combined 25,600 people with $30 million or more in net worth (which includes shares in publicly traded and closely held companies, residential and investment real estate, art, planes, cash and other investible assets).

    That is about half the number of ultra-high-net individuals in the U.S., according to Wealth-X.

    The BRIC ultrarich have a combined net worth of $4.125 trillion, compared to $6.4 trillion for the U.S.

    [​IMG]

    What is most interesting about the BRIC data is the concentration of wealth at the very top of the wealth pyramid. In Russia, the nation’s 80 billionaires account for 7% of the total population of people with a net worth of $30 million or more, but they own 84% of that group’s $640 billion in wealth.

    In Brazil, the nation’s 50 billionaires account for less than 1% of the ultrarich population but a third of the group’s $890 billion in wealth. India’s 115 billionaires represent 1.4% of the total ultrarich population and 20% of the group’s wealth of $945 billion.

    China’s billionaires account for 1% of the ultrarich and about a third of their wealth of $1.65 trillion.

    The U.S., of course, isn’t exactly a model of equity when it comes to billionaires and the ultra-rich. Its 450 billionaires account for less than one percent of the ultra-rich population but control 25% of the group’s $6.4 trillion wealth.

    But the fastest global growth in billionaires and their lesser ultra-rich aspirants will likely be from the BRICS rather than the U.S. or Europe.

    “In Russia, as in other emerging markets….billionaires and near-billionaires, followed in aggregate by the mass of ultra-high-net-worth will dominate wealth,” according to Wealth-X.

    Which country would you want to live in if you had a net worth of $30 million or more?

    BRIC Country Super-Rich Worth $4 Trillion - The Wealth Report - WSJ


    => along with the fact that all the growth of India has been covered up due to high population growth. we generally remember 1991 Economic Reform of India, as the year till then per capita income of India was higher than that of China, as below. as discussed in the last post#8 too, Middle Class number of India at 350million+ stands well over its total population at 1947 itself, and its only the over population why India is a poor country :ranger:

    BRITAIN GDP PER CAPITA PPP at 1991, $23,924.22
    United Kingdom GDP per capita PPP | 1990-2014 | Data | Chart | Calendar

    RUSSIA GDP PER CAPITA PPP at 1991, $15,625.62
    Russia GDP per capita PPP | 1990-2014 | Data | Chart | Calendar | Forecast

    INDIA GDP PER CAPITA PPP at 1991, $1,812.36 :ranger:
    India GDP per capita PPP | 1990-2014 | Data | Chart | Calendar | Forecast

    CHINA GDP PER CAPITA PPP AT 1991, $1,554.01
    China GDP per capita PPP | 1990-2014 | Data | Chart | Calendar | Forecast

    .
     
    Last edited: Oct 12, 2014
  11. genius

    genius Regular Member

    Joined:
    Sep 13, 2014
    Messages:
    686
    Likes Received:
    117
    Location:
    India
    Wish India could give 'aid' to the 400 million poor before giving 'aid' to Africa or whatever. Our poor deserve our compassion.
     
    Peace Lover likes this.
  12. ezsasa

    ezsasa Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jul 12, 2014
    Messages:
    3,500
    Likes Received:
    3,021
    Location:
    Hyderabad, Andhra Pradesh, India
    As per the current world bank estimates Indians below Bpl is 178 million not 400 million.

    These aid donor countries typically have clauses stipulating that the items procured by receiving countries using the aid should be bought from donor countries only . So basically some of the aid money comes back to india. Foreign aids are not necessarily charity , they are just a business model with diplomatic benefits .
     
  13. santosh10

    santosh10 Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2014
    Messages:
    1,666
    Likes Received:
    174
    Location:
    Lucknow
    or better we would stop shiits coming from Bangladesh, which would itself reduce number of Indian poor by more than 50% :ranger:
     
    Sylex21 likes this.
  14. santosh10

    santosh10 Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2014
    Messages:
    1,666
    Likes Received:
    174
    Location:
    Lucknow

    Over-Population Notes

    World is changing and few points everyone knows on the world platform in today's world, no need to read articles, as below:

    1st; High Population means high consumption of resources, and hence its higher prices for the people of whole world.

    2nd; high energy consumption and hence higher green house gas emission, hence increasing Climate Change threats this way

    3rd; High Subsidy to feed poor below poverty line, especially in case of India. which is possible only until its Middle Class may afford it. and we must avid that breaking point :tup:

    4th; and, we also encourage a "Population Tax" on every second kid taking birth in a family, which may be denoted to World Bank/ Climate Change Organizations to reduce its effects. i mean, if you can't reduce population then at least pay something to reduce its effects on the world's Climate Change. and yes, this "Population Tax" on the 'non-first' child would be same for the people of whole world. :coffee:

    .
    Few Key Points I always mention on this Topic as below:

    these are my own ideas so it does require criticism by other members to make the topic interesting :thumb:

    1st; if the poor of India ask the Western nations to share the burden of subsidies then they will simply kick these shiits of India, isn't it? and if its only Indian Middle Class who is generating money and running government and also paying heavy price for the welfare/subsidies for poor, then they do have a right to ask the Indian Government, "to what extent they will have to bear this burden of tax just to feed poor, and whether they will remain capable enough in future also to bear this burden on long run if the government doesn't control the population?????" :facepalm:

    like the news as below, around 50% indian population is based in agriculture only, around 600mil, while even 200mil population may produce the same agriculture output? and the same in cities of India, around 50% people just try to earn a decent salary which they can't, simply because too many mouths and limited resources. and Indian Middle Class is just paying high price to feed these around 600mil 'excess' population, but still there is no effort to have a control on this growing population????

    2nd; here for example of Pakistan and Bangladesh, right now overly populated Pakistan is full of target killings, simply because too many mouth and no resources to feed them. its also similar to 'genocide' itself?????? and Bangladeshis just want to run from Bangladesh, mainly to India. its the worse to see people dying without dignity than controlling population by force........

    3rd; many economists of India advocate "food security"/ "free medicines"/ "right to get a job" etc in India which is not possible until the Indian government may control its population. they simply can't feed 1.25bil population from the limited natural resources they have . USA is 3 times bigger in area than India but population of India is 4 times to USA? and on the top of that, Indian government wants to give welfare/ heavy subsidies to its people? if India face a sudden fall like ASEAN in late 90s and South America like in 80s, all these they will have to withdraw after that so better they keep habit to live in less and get rid off the unnecessary subsidies/welfares . for example, we always find Pakistan increasing petrol and diesel prices as per market prices as they can't afford to give subsidies while the people of Pakistan are poorer than India, but Indian government always hesitate to do so? but the day India will reach level of Pakistan, just one good economic fall is required, and India will learn all by themselves. :wave:

    4th; here we have report from world bank that around 60% people of India are living with income less than $2.0 per day, as below

    here, how is it wise to have high population if you can't give them good life? how is it advisable to have more population this way???

    => Poverty headcount ratio at $2 a day (PPP) (% of population) | Data | Table

    5th; Population of India was hardly around 341 million at the time of freedom, in 1947, and we can't have more than 700 million people, and we need a national consensus on it. :india:

    and as Overpopulation of India is directly related to consumption of natural resources of the world, high pollution and hence Climate Change due to high consumption of energy. reduced water level has also been caused in India due to the same high population and hence high demand reasons, hence India is directly answerable to the rest of the world about the measures it is adopting to reduce its population to 700 million, say by 2050
    :truestory:

    we can't let India become one of the reason for the destruction of this world, as the Earth belongs to every person of the world, regardless any nationality :nono:

    6th; and here, first there is no control on the population, as much as India can have, and on the top of that, they want to feed them for nothing too :rofl:

    => At Rs 1,25,000 cr, Food Security Bill largest in world: Implementation a challenge, says Morgan Stanley - Economic Times

    This topic is also discussed int he thread as below

    http://defenceforumindia.com/forum/...source-sufficiency-evaluation.html#post955536
     
    Last edited: Oct 12, 2014
  15. santosh10

    santosh10 Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2014
    Messages:
    1,666
    Likes Received:
    174
    Location:
    Lucknow
    Foreign cos pulling more money out of India

    May 25 (Reuters) - Foreign direct investment, the sort of sticky long-term money India craves to fund its current account deficit and build up its infrastructure, may not be so stable after all.

    According to a Nomura report, multinational companies have been pulling money out of India at an accelerating rate, moving $10.7 billion out of the country in 2011, up from $7.2 billion in 2010 and just $3.1 billion in 2009. :ranger:

    Outward flows are bad news for a country that this week saw its rupee currency hit a new record low as investors worry about its hefty fiscal and current account shortfalls, slowing economic growth and policy gridlock.

    Still, corporate funds continue to enter India even as existing investors exit. Inbound foreign direct investment surged 88 percent to a record $36.5 billion in the fiscal year that ended in March, according to official data.

    "Global deleveraging may have forced companies to sell their Indian assets and repatriate funds to their home country," Nomura analysts wrote in the Friday note.

    "At the same time, domestic push factors such as slowing potential growth, the high cost of doing business and regulatory uncertainty have weakened the investment climate, likely causing this erosion. This is not a good sign."

    Telecoms companies Etisalat of Abu Dhabi and Bahrain Telecommunications Co are leaving India after their mobile phone licences were among those ordered cancelled by an Indian court amid a corruption probe.

    New York Life recently exited its 26 percent stake in an Indian insurance venture with Max India for $530 million, while U.S. mutual fund giant Fidelity Worldwide Investment recently struck a deal to unload its India unit to local company L&T Finance Holdings.

    Foreign companies have been increasingly frustrated by regulatory uncertainty and a lack of reforms. Rules that would allow foreign companies into the supermarket and airline industries are stalled.

    Vodafone, the world's biggest mobile carrier, has repeatedly clashed with authorities in India, which is trying to collect more than $2 billion in taxes from it through a retroactive law change, even after India's highest court ruled in the company's favour.

    Vodafone, the biggest overseas corporate investor in India, has said it will not walk away.

    The Nomura report said the services, manufacturing and real estate sectors probably saw "the maximum outflow".

    Foreign cos pulling more money out of India-Nomura | Reuters
     
    Last edited: Oct 12, 2014
  16. santosh10

    santosh10 Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2014
    Messages:
    1,666
    Likes Received:
    174
    Location:
    Lucknow
    Emerging Aid Donors: India

    India’s experience as a long-standing recipient of aid from developed countries is well known and well documented, but far less so its own role as a provider of development assistance to other countries. In the last decade, India has quietly become a significant donor of aid to other less developed countries, and current trends suggest that it could become a net exporter of aid in the next few years. This transformation is being driven by a combination of factors, including India’s self-conscious role as an emerging power, its competition with China for political influence and energy resources, and the rapid growth of its economy, including both its non-profit and private sectors. :thumb:

    Around the mid-1980s, India was the world’s largest recipient of multilateral aid and among the top recipients of bilateral aid. However, Indian economic reforms that began in the early 1990s have almost doubled the country’s long-term annual GDP growth, consequent to which foreign aid has become far less central to India’s overall economic development. In fact, the level of both multilateral and bilateral support has dropped sharply in the last decade, and it is currently less than US $ 2 billion annually, which is just about 0.2 percent of India’s GDP.

    In contrast, India’s own overseas development assistance (ODA) program, which officially began in 1964 when a separate budget heading for foreign aid was first created, has grown rapidly in recent years (table below), registering a compound annual growth rate of 6.9% from 2004 to 2010. In fact, India’s accumulated aid over the last 3 decades currently stands at over US $2.5 billion – for a poor country that represents a significant financial outreach.

    Table 1. India's foreign aid-related budget, 2004-10 (INR million)

    The bulk of India’s overseas assistance is directed at neighbouring countries of Bhutan, Afghanistan and Nepal, while a significant and increasing share is directed to African nations. Approximately 60 percent of Indian ODA is spent on training of civil servants, engineers and public-sector managers of recipient nations; about 30 percent is spent on providing soft loans to foreign governments to enable them to purchase Indian equipment or services, such as trucks, ground-water pumps, medicines, public health infrastructure or railway equipment; and the remainder 10 percent is spent on project-related costs abroad, such as feasibility studies or technical expertise from India on government-run institutions such as hospitals, railway services and universities. In general, India gives very little aid as outright cash grants. :ranger:

    Training and education are done under ITEC (Indian Technical and Economic Cooperation Programme), a department within the MEA, with Indian diplomatic missions abroad acting as major contact points. Soft lines of credit are usually channeled and managed by the EXIM Bank of India, a public sector bank which works under the administrative control of the Ministry of Finance.

    The single-most defining characteristic of India’s overseas aid program is that it attempts to share India’s own experience in poverty alleviation and development through an active pipeline of consultants and experts. The bulk of Indian aid is spent on human training, capacity building and other “soft” investments in recipient nations, though it also supports a number of physical projects through financial or technical assistance. :thumb:

    Of course, India's economic diplomacy has just barely begun and is way behind China’s in hard numbers, and in fact Chinese ODA is estimated to be about ten times larger than India’s. However India has a vast array of IT and other knowledge-based skills, English language skills, human capital, institutions and legacies that constitute tremendous potential for providing technical assistance to others, all at relatively low cost. In addition, India has a long tradition of democracy that may be relevant for governance reform in many poorer countries.

    Overall, there are many reasons to believe that India is moving to become a major player in the development assistance world. At the outset, there is the simple geopolitics of aid and India’s quest for regional power status, even membership as a permanent member in a restructured UN Security Council. India’s growing middle class and a confident entrepreneurial class have created a huge appetite for energy sources and simultaneously allowed the country to parley its economic footprint abroad. And of course, India has also found a strategic opening for itself after the collapse of the Soviet Union which disrupted the steady source of economic assistance to many poor countries of Africa and Asia. All these broad trends have coalesced to propel India into the donor category.

    However, despite its expanding foray in ODA, India’s attempts have been filled with many inconsistencies and even incoherence. There is still no single ODA agency in India’s vast bureaucratic empire, though successive governments have contemplated creating a dedicated aid agency. There is a belated recognition in India’s foreign policy establishment that if Indian ODA is to achieve its unstated but evident aim of helping India become an influential regional player, its development assistance effort will need more money, better focus, sharper delivery and a more professional administration.

    Emerging Aid Donors: India - NORRAG
     
  17. santosh10

    santosh10 Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2014
    Messages:
    1,666
    Likes Received:
    174
    Location:
    Lucknow
    No conditionalities attached to Indian aid to other nations: Foreign Secy
    Apr 15 2013

    Foreign Secretary RanjanMathai today said India's assistance to foreign countries was demand-driven and had no "conditionalities" attached to it.

    MrMathai said over the last years, India had considerably expanded its development cooperation portfolio through grant assistance to Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Bhutan, Maldives, Myanmar, Nepal and Sri Lanka for projects in infrastructure, hydroelectricity, power transmission, and other sectors identified by the host government as priority areas for their development.

    Moreover, over the last decade or so, over 150 Lines of Credit totalling over 9.5 billion dollars had been allocated, financing a wide range of projects from drinking water schemes to power plants to technology parks and railway infrastructure in developing countries in Africa and elsewhere.
    :india:

    " Our engagement is demand-driven and responds to the developmental priorities of our partner countries. We do not attach conditionalities, we do not prescribe policies and we do not challenge national sovereignty," he emphasiseddeliverisng the keynote address by Foreign Secretary at 'Conference of Southern Providers- South-South Cooperation: Issues and Emerging Challenges'.

    The Foreign Secretary sought to point out that South-South cooperation was on an entirely different footing from North-South cooperation in inspiration, implementation and impact.

    There was an acknowledged historical context to Official Development Assistance (ODA), which distinguishes North-South Cooperation from South-South Cooperation.

    The focus on South-South cooperation in the prevailing international discourse on aid architecture increasingly glosses over this fact as it conveniently overlooked the reality that developing countries even the so called emerging economies continue to confront major economic challenges of their own, exacerbated by the current global economic situation, which place an inherent limitation on their capacity to contribute to international development cooperation. :thumb:

    The assistance which developing countries offer to other developing countries should therefore continue to remain voluntary and free from externally imposed norms drawn from North-South Cooperation, he stressed.

    "Simply put, whereas North-South cooperation is a historic responsibility, South-South cooperation is a voluntary partnership. The fact that the traditional donor community often underplays this distinction does not diminish its validity," he said.

    "In the present global realities, it is self-evident that while South-South Cooperation supplements North-South Cooperation, it is not yet in a position to replace it in any significant measure. The North-South engagement leads the aid process and should continue to do so," he added.

    http://news.webindia123.com/news/articles/India/20130415/2189472.html
     
  18. santosh10

    santosh10 Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2014
    Messages:
    1,666
    Likes Received:
    174
    Location:
    Lucknow
    India sets up global aid agency
    Development Partnership Administration has a corpus of $15 billion :india:

    India has set up its own international aid agency similar to USAID and UK's Department for International Development (DFID), with an estimated corpus of a sizable $15-billion to be spent over the next five years. This new agency, called Development Partnership Administration (DPA), will oversee all the development partnership projects that India will undertake in developing countries around the world. DPA is headed by Ministry of External Affairs' (MEA) additional secretary P.S. Raghavan and will bring under one umbrella all agencies involved with foreign aid and development projects within the MEA. The DPA is being formed by streamlining three different organisations within the MEA that currently oversee India-sponsored development projects abroad. Foreign aid from the BRIC group of nations to other developing nations has increased drastically in the past few years, with a Global Humanitarian Association estimate suggesting foreign aid from Brazil, Russia, India and China more than doubling between 2005 and 2008. :truestory:

    "We do not like to call ourselves a donor," says Syed Akbaruddin, joint secretary with the Ministry of External Affairs. "We call it development partnership because it is in the framework of sharing development experiences.:india: It follows a model different from that followed in the conventional North-South economic cooperation patterns, hence the designation of Development Partnership Administration, it is administering our development partnership projects."

    Under the grants assistance scheme, India has made significant contributions in many countries, specifically in the South Asia region in the areas of education, IT, energy and healthcare.

    Efforts such as post-war reconstruction projects in Sri Lanka, hydroelectric power projects with Bhutan, which is the biggest recipient of Indian aid (Rs 1,330 cr in 2010-11), road connectivity projects with Myanmar, which will connect the India's Mizoram with the Myanmar port of Sittwe and recently a multitude of development projects in Afghanistan including recent plans to export more than 1.5 lakh tonnes of wheat to the struggling nation are some instances of India's growing influence via foreign development projects.

    About ten years ago, Indian foreign aid projects were very limited both in terms of resources and geographical spread. However, today the reach of Indian aid has spread around the world with more than 60 countries benefiting from India sponsored projects. IT projects in many African nations have been a thrust area. "DPA is an agency meant to streamline implementation, not to lay down policy, not to contribute to policy," explains Akbaruddin. "We will only implement the policies given by the political wing of the MEA, the Minister, the Foreign Secretary, the Secretaries and the territorial divisions," he adds.

    India's foreign projects under the DPA will work around strict considerations of mutual benefits. Many projects do have spin-offs of promotions of Indian exports and India's requirements to access all important international energy resources. For example, India's energy projects in Sudan and South Sudan have also provided opportunity for Indian companies to contribute to local communities via many social projects, including the recent distribution of thousands of footballs to schools and children's camps due to the popularity of the sport in the African continent.

    India sets up global aid agency

    India sets up global aid agency
     
    Last edited: Oct 12, 2014
  19. santosh10

    santosh10 Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2014
    Messages:
    1,666
    Likes Received:
    174
    Location:
    Lucknow
    22,000 new scholarships for African students in various academic courses :india:

    New Delhi, Mar 1 (ANI): Highlighting India's commitment to development in Africa, Minister of State for External Affairs PreneetKaur said here on Thursday that 22,000 new scholarships for African students in various academic courses and training programmes, including special agriculture scholarships and C.V. Raman fellowships have been made available. :thumb:

    Kaur, who was addressing the inaugural session of India-Africa Science and Technology Ministerial Conference, said proposals for the institutional strengthening of identified institutions in Africa and the transfer of need based technologies have also been initiated.

    "There is a provision for 22,000 new scholarships for African students in various academic courses and training programmes including special agriculture scholarships and C.V. Raman fellowships," said Kaur.

    "As per India's commitment to assist African countries in the field of Science and Technology, proposals for institutional strengthening of identified institutions in Africa and transfer of need based technologies have also been initiated," she added.

    She informed that her ministry has duly secured approvals from the Union Cabinet to support these initiatives through its "Aid to Africa" budget.

    Kaur also said that India has successfully implemented the Pan-African e-Network Project, including tele-education, tele-medicine and connectivity between leaders in 47 African countries and an agreement has also been signed for its implementation in the 48th country, South Sudan recently.

    Under the framework of the Science and Technology Initiatives for Africa, Department of Science and Technology in partnership with Ministry of External Affairs organised the 'India-Africa Science and Technology Ministers Conference'.

    This major ministerial level event has being organised in close coordination with the African Union Commission and is being attended by science and technology ministers from across the African continent along with senior official from various countries. he event is expected to provide a platform for the advocacy, outreach and commitment of India under the framework of the New Science and Technology Cooperation Initiative with Africa.:thumb:

    The ministerial conference also intends to help to develop linkages and also secure the interests and commitments of the African partners to this Indian initiative. (ANI)

    22,000 new scholarships for African students in various academic courses: Preneet Kaur
     
  20. santosh10

    santosh10 Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2014
    Messages:
    1,666
    Likes Received:
    174
    Location:
    Lucknow
    thats i have discussed in post#8 of this thread too. a high population developing economy like India has around 40% of its GDP 'undocumented', which suddenly raise its per capita income by around 60%, as of today.

    World Bank, IMF etc used to calculated GDP on PPP considering the 'undocumented' part of GDP too till 2007, which used to raise Per Capita Income of India on PPP by around 60%, like as below. which confirm GDP on PPP of India at $5.0trillion+ by even 2007 itself by using that old method :ranger:

    =>

    things don't work on 'Linearity' but in a lay man term we may say that GDP on PPP of India by 2014 would be around = 5.16/3.19 * 5.5 = $8.90 trillion on PPP by 2014, around, considering the undocumented part of GDP might have had similar increase ....

    considering its GDP by new method at around $5.5trillion by the end of 2014 :thumb:
     
    Last edited: Oct 17, 2014
  21. jouni

    jouni Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2014
    Messages:
    3,898
    Likes Received:
    1,123
    Location:
    finland
    Is this the same principle like in Italy, that after they started calculating mafia and prostitution to the GDP, they realized that they are not any more in recession.
     
    santosh10 likes this.

Share This Page