90pc Pakistanis are poor: economist Call for agricultural reforms for poverty eradica

Discussion in 'Pakistan' started by illusion8, Feb 19, 2012.

  1. illusion8

    illusion8 Regular Member

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  3. sayareakd

    sayareakd Moderator Moderator

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    no wonder they eat grass, to make nukes.
     
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  4. Mikkis

    Mikkis Regular Member

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    Slumdog Millionaire was a good movie though i didn't watch that.
    the way the movie was so popular in the west it appears to be the hit movie.
    Last time i visited mumbai i saw many slums in the roads sleeping down there which i havent seen in Pakistan.
    Too many slums that even driver think that it was the road not slums.
     
  5. Mikkis

    Mikkis Regular Member

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    Miami Herald reporter finds Pakistan young, proud, hospitable
    ‘A nation striving and struggling for a better life, a economy, a better country, a better life.’

    By Nancy San Martin
    [email protected]


    KARACHI, Pakistan -- My first encounter with this city was 10 years ago as a stopover on my way to cover the war in neighboring Afghanistan. American journalist Daniel Pearl was kidnapped here then executed by his abductors, who released images of a decapitated head for the world to see.

    So it was with some apprehension that I recently embarked on a 10-day journey with eight other journalists across three cities in a nation inextricably linked with the ongoing “war against terrorism.”

    The trip, sponsored by the Washington, D.C.-based International Center for Journalists, was part of a binational program to strengthen ties between American and Pakistani journalists as a way to help improve journalism standards in a relatively young and booming industry in Pakistan and broaden the scope of coverage media outlets in both nations give to each other. The effort comes at a time when U.S.-Pakistan relations are strained.

    For me, it was an opportunity to try to understand a place and a population many associate only with violence. Before we left, State Department officials and Pakistan experts warned that we would find a “vociferous internal debate” about U.S.-Pakistan relations and “widespread national resentment” about U.S. policy and actions. They were right.

    But I also found an immensely hospitable and proud people caught in a web of misperceptions, misunderstandings and long list of challenges, especially for the next generation.

    ISLAMABAD

    In this vibrant capital city, the government’s own think-tank acknowledges that perhaps the most pressing issue for securing its future is preparing its youth.

    Pakistan has a huge “youth overhang,’’ said Nadeem Ul Haque, deputy chairman of the government’s planning commission.

    Sixty percent of an estimated 180 million people are under the age of 30. Half are 20 years old and younger. And 50 percent of school-age children are not getting an education.

    “Education is very, very limited,’’ Haque said. “So what are these kids going to do?”

    Unfortunately — like in many developing nations — many children end up on the streets. That is a dilemma for a country that is itself going through growing pains — politically, economically, emotionally and psychologically.

    “Pakistan is in transition, a country that is trying to do things in its own shoddy ways,” said respected TV anchor Talat Hussain.

    Maj. Gen. Najmuddin Shaikh, of the National Defense University, said Pakistan is going through a “special phase.”

    A civilian government is in place and headed to its first democratic handover following elections next year. The judicial system is gaining strength, though it remains a weak institution. And the media industry, particularly broadcast news, is booming though also criticized for being “too sensational.”

    Still, it is “America’s war” in neighboring Afghanistan and Washington action or inaction in relation to Pakistan’s role in the so-called “end game” that seems to consume all other issues. That “vociferous debate” is reflected in newspapers, Internet sites and TV news and talk shows.

    The United States has had a fragile relationship with Pakistan since the latter became a nation in 1947. Military and economic assistance has been awarded then pulled in response to various upheavals, including persistent conflicts with neighboring India, nuclear tests by both nations and domestic political turmoil.

    The United States and Pakistan became close allies following the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks when American troops went on the hunt for al-Qaida fighters in Afghanistan and the Taliban regime collapsed. But the relationship has soured as actions in Afghanistan have a spill-over effect on Pakistan and conspiracy theories swirl over all that is tied to that war, including last year’s U.S. special forces raid at a hideout near Islamabad that killed Osama Bin Laden and the controversial use of U.S. drone-fired missiles to kill enemies operating inside Pakistan. Many view the attacks as an infringement on sovereignty.

    Since the start of the war in Afghanistan, some 36,000 Pakistanis have been killed, including journalists covering volatile border regions.

    “Retaliation happens here,” said Syeda Abida Hussain, a former Pakistan ambassador to the United States.

    LAHORE

    Like in the capital, the news media in this traffic-congested city has played a pivotal role in providing information to the public. But it’s also facing difficulties, especially those working in border areas. More than a dozen journalists were killed while on assignment last year and Pakistan is listed as one of the most dangerous places for journalists. Death threats are common and considered just another part of the job.

    The battle for viewers in an industry that grew from just one state-controlled network a decade ago to 85 broadcast channels today has made for aggressive — some say irresponsible — reporting.

    “The audience isn’t used to how bold we’ve become,” said Atif Fakhar, executive producer at Express News.

    “I think we’re still very immature in our media coverage,’’ said Ayza Omar, a producer at the same network. “It’s a growing process. It will take time and probably many more lives but we have to unite to apply pressure and let [those who issue and carry out death threats] know that we won’t be quieted into submission; that we’ll continue to cover and uncover the truth.”

    Khurshid Kasuri, a former foreign minister now with an opposition party known by the acronym PTI, said media coverage is flawed in Pakistan and the United States.

    “Here, Americans are the devils and there, Pakistanis are the devils,’’ he said, adding that neither side bothers to understand each other’s perspectives.

    Students at the prestigious Lahore University of Management Sciences echoed the sentiment. One student said that listening to some U.S. media references to Muslims and Pakistanis “is scary.”

    “We are just a nation striving and struggling for a better economy, a better country, a better life,’’ complained another. “We are not terrorists.” A third student criticized Pakistani media as too “one-sided,” focusing only on the negative stories. “They are like gladiators watching the fight and we are the entertainment.”

    The question these students want answered: Will the United States help with Afghanistan’s restructure after the pullout?

    If the United States doesn’t ensure stability, these youngsters warned, the children of conflict will grow up hating America and there will never be peace.

    An estimated three million Afghans displaced by the war are currently living in Pakistan and about 500,000 Afghan children are enrolled in Pakistan schools. That’s a lot for a country where as much as half of primary school-age children are not getting an education.

    Many we spoke to expressed fear that once American troops are out — perhaps in 2013 — the United States will abandon both Afghanistan and Pakistan.

    “You will leave,’’ said Kasuri, the former foreign minister. “Pakistan will always be here.”

    KARACHI

    The final leg of our two-week visit was to a city where sectarian violence and suicide attacks remain prevalent. Here, we found hope for the future at a pristine school across from a slum where barefoot children play between piles of trash.

    Posted on a bulletin board in a hallway was this message: “Many of life’s failures are people who did not realize how close they were to success when they gave up.”

    The school is funded by The Citizens Foundation (TCF), a nonprofit organization established in 1995 by people concerned with the dismal state of education in Pakistan. The foundation has opened 730 schools and deliberately placed them in urban slums so the poor have access to education.

    So far, 102,000 students are enrolled. TCF hopes to enroll an additional 10,000 by increasing the number of schools to 1,000. That is a small dent in overall education needs. The foundation estimates that there are about seven million other children who should be in classrooms but don’t have the means.

    It is these youngsters — the children of conflict — who tugged most at the heart of my Florida colleague.

    “Hey, I have an idea,’’ Bob Gabordi, the executive editor at the Tallahassee Democrat, whispered to me. “Let’s do something to help these kids.”

    Bob and I have been talking to our colleagues and new friends in Pakistan to come up with a project that would benefit the children of conflict. We’re still fine-tuning the idea. But the TCF vision certainly provides inspiration. In addition to removing economic barriers to providing an education, teachers at these schools also focus on character building. They view students as “agents of positive change.”

    On our Saturday visit to the school, small groups of boys and girls were in classrooms meeting with mentors. They talked about goals and how to achieve them. Written on a piece of paper one of the students carried were these words: “You can live life as a victim or as a creator.”

    I hope to return to Pakistan a third time to cover a new war: the battle in the field of education for the masses. This time, I’d like to document stories of children overcoming conflict. That seems like a worthy battle.


    Read more here: Miami Herald reporter finds Pakistan young, proud, hospitable - Issues & Ideas - MiamiHerald.com
     
  6. Bangalorean

    Bangalorean Stars and Ambassadors Stars and Ambassadors

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    "Last time you visited Mumbai" - really, you are a liar. :tsk:

    Where did you stay in Mumbai and what did you come for? To plant a bomb? When a Pakistani travels anywhere in the world, it is usually to plant bombs...
     
  7. Dovah

    Dovah Untermensch Senior Member

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    Too busy watching Bollywood on cheap pirated CDs?

    Yeah it did well.

    Hahahahahahahahaha................... You might think we find this offensive. Tbh, we find you guys are amusing.
     
  8. maomao

    maomao Veteran Hunter of Maleecha Senior Member

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  9. Blackwater

    Blackwater Veteran Member Veteran Member

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    Pakistan 's agriculture technique is very old and backward.though they got more fertile land but they could not make use of it. Lack of education,lack good agriculture university and lack of land reforms are to be blamed
     
    Last edited: Feb 20, 2012
  10. Blackwater

    Blackwater Veteran Member Veteran Member

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    mikki pasha, we made slum dog millionaire, coz we realize our poverty and we are working on it. Despite of our huge population we are moving ahead slowly but steadily to eradicate it.

    on the other hand Pakistan since independence has gone and going down in every field if i start naming them u will faint.

    the sooner you realize that u r not Switzerland better for u.
     
    Last edited: Feb 20, 2012
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  11. Blackwater

    Blackwater Veteran Member Veteran Member

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    for u mikki pasha

     
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  12. Blackwater

    Blackwater Veteran Member Veteran Member

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    For darling Mikiki



     
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  13. Blackwater

    Blackwater Veteran Member Veteran Member

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    For lovely mikki

     
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  14. Blackwater

    Blackwater Veteran Member Veteran Member

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    Miikii u have a debt of 60,000 PKR


     
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  15. Blackwater

    Blackwater Veteran Member Veteran Member

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    Mikki darling Your own paki media


     
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  16. Blackwater

    Blackwater Veteran Member Veteran Member

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    Miikki teri aukat

     
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  17. Mikkis

    Mikkis Regular Member

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    Wellcome back you kala pani.....
    Now we will have some fun here after watching double face avatar..
     
  18. Blackwater

    Blackwater Veteran Member Veteran Member

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    Mikki list is very long,, apni aukat me aja.


     
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  19. Blackwater

    Blackwater Veteran Member Veteran Member

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    Watch your own paki video aur apni aukat me aja
     
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  20. Godless-Kafir

    Godless-Kafir DFI Buddha Senior Member

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    Your no one to talk of BW, your country men are killing each other and yet you come here for moral judgement of the kafir. Your nation indulges in everything from terrorism to child rape and yet you have some moral superiority over the Kafir. Brain washed.
     
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  21. Blackwater

    Blackwater Veteran Member Veteran Member

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    Problem with these pakis is that, they think they are born and live in Switzerland and powerful as ameerica , but aukat salo ki Somalia ki bhi nahi ha. If they talk in their aukat, i dont have any problem
     

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