75 dead in Indonesian quake!

Discussion in 'Defence & Strategic Issues' started by enlightened1, Sep 30, 2009.

  1. enlightened1

    enlightened1 Member of The Month JANUARY 2010

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    # Missing British child, 2, believed dead after tsunami struck Samoa
    # Samoan tsunami kills at least 99; Indonesian earthquake kills 'up to 1,000'
    # 'Thousands' buried under rubble after Indonesian earthquake
    # Indonesian quake along same fault line as quake that caused 2004 Boxing Day tsunami; both disasters took place on Pacific Ring of Fire​


    Hundreds of people are feared dead and thousands more homeless after first a tsunami then an earthquake struck hours apart along the Pacific Ring of Fire. A two-year-old British child is among the 99 people killed when a tsunami swept through the Pacific Ocean yesterday, flattening entire villages in its path. Hours later an earthquake rocked Indonesia, leaving thousands buried underneath rubble and prompting new tsunami warnings. Authorities have confirmed 75 people dead, though one health official has been quoted as saying 1,000 people are dead.

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    No one spared: An aerial of Hihifo on the western side of Tonga after the first powerful earthquake sent tsunami waves sweeping through the Pacific

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  3. enlightened1

    enlightened1 Member of The Month JANUARY 2010

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    At least 75 people are dead and thousands are trapped under rubble after a strong earthquake shook western Indonesia, officials say. Buildings, including at least two hospitals, were brought down by the 7.6 magnitude quake, centred about 50km (30 miles) off the coast of Sumatra. Officials say the death toll is expected to rise. It comes hours after a tsunami from a separate quake killed more than 100 people in the South Pacific.

    A tsunami watch issued by the Pacific Tsunami Warning Center in the wake of the Indonesian quake has been lifted.

    Aid 'on the way'
    The coastal city of Padang, capital of West Sumatra province, is among the areas hardest hit.

    ANALYSIS
    Karishma Vaswani
    Karishma Vaswani, BBC News, Jakarta

    We've heard that some of the roads to these areas have been cut off and there are concerns about communications - phone lines and electricity have also been cut off.

    Indonesia is no stranger to disasters of this sort - the ability to reach people is often criticised and one of the hospitals nearest the epicentre has also collapsed, so there are real concerns about how to get to the places most affected.


    At least six disaster management teams are on their way to the city of Padang. We've been told it will take up to 10 hours to get to the areas most affected. Vice-President Jusuf Kalla said the death toll was likely to continue to rise sharply, as so many buildings including schools, shops and hotels had collapsed.

    "We don't know the identity of the victims yet, it's night-time now so it's dark. People are trapped, hotels have collapsed, schools have collapsed, houses have collapsed and electricity has been cut off," he said, quoted by AFP news agency.

    Health Minister Siti Fadilah Supari said the quake was one of the biggest in Indonesia in recent years. "This is a high-scale disaster, more powerful than the earthquake in Yogyakarta in 2006 when more than 3,000 people died," he said.

    Rustam Pakaya, head of the health ministry's crisis centre, said a major city hospital was among the collapsed buildings. At least six rescue teams were on their way to Padang from neighbouring provinces, he said, but would not arrive for at least 10 hours. Local media reported the roof of the city's airport had also collapsed.

    Mukhlis Rahman, mayor of the Pariaman District, one of the worst hit areas, said the weather was hindering efforts to clear up after the disaster. ''The quake was followed by a very heavy rain. Many houses and some building are flattened in my area. But I cannot yet verify too much. We will try to compile the data and distribute aid once the rain subsides,'' he told the BBC.

    MAJOR INDONESIAN QUAKES
    Map of earthquake off the coast of Sumatra
    26 Dec 2004: Asian tsunami kills 170,000 in Indonesia alone
    28 March 2005: About 1,300 killed after a magnitude 8.7 quake hits the coast of Sumatra
    27 May 2006: Quake hits ancient city of Yogyakarta, killing 5,000
    17 July 2006: A tsunami after a 7.7 magnitude quake in West Java province kills 550 people


    'Extreme panic'
    Witnesses said residents ran out of buildings in Padang - which has a population of 900,000 - and surrounding cities. "A number of hotels in Padang have been destroyed," Rahmat Triyono, from the Indonesian geophysics and meteorology agency, told AFP news agency. "Up to now we haven't been able to reach Padang, communications have been cut," Mr Triyono added. An unnamed witness told Reuters there was "extreme panic" in the city, with bridges down and flooding caused by broken water pipes.

    The earthquake struck at 1716 local time (1016 GMT) some 85km under the sea, north-west of Padang, the US Geological Survey said. Reports said the shaking could be felt in high buildings in the capital, Jakarta, and was also felt in Singapore and Malaysia. The quake was along the same fault line that spawned the 2004 Asian tsunami that killed more than 230,000 people in a dozen countries. That much more powerful earthquake struck roughly 600km north-west of Padang. Geologists have long warned that Padang could one day be completely destroyed by an earthquake because of its location. Western Sumatra is a mainly rural area with dense tropical forest. It has several national parks and many of its beaches are popular with surfers.
     
  4. Rage

    Rage DFI TEAM Stars and Ambassadors

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    The death toll has climbed to a few thousands. Some 4000 people are estimated to be buried under all that earthquake rubble.

    R.I.P. my Indonesian brothers. May the gods grant you safe passage to your eternal abode.



    Indonesia UPDATE:4000 Buried Under Earthquake Rubble

    October 3, 2009

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    Indonesia UPDATE: 4000 Buried Under Earthquake Rubble in the aftermath of the devastating earthquakes in Indonesia with a rising death toll of 540.

    A 7.6 magnitude quake struck Sumatra on Wednesday, September 30th, 2009, and a 6.6 magnitude earthquake hit Thursday morning, October 1st, 2009, in the same hard hit area..

    Wednesday’s Sumatra earthquake, reduced buildings to rubble through out the city. People frantically used hammers, chisels and bare hands to dig through debris for survivors and belongings they could still use.

    Staff at a local hospital treated the injured outside a semi-collapsed hospital as bodies of those dead, lay in makeshift morgues.

    If you look at the area hardest hit, you will see an area that now looks like a flattened mess of destruction, where just days ago, there stood a group of three villages.

    Officials now believe that 90 percent of Sumatra residents, as many as a few hundred people, were buried, just one piece of the devastation from two large earthquakes that struck Indonesia back to back.

    Indonesia’s health ministry and ministry of social affairs stated Friday, that they believe thousands remain buried beneath rubble, as the unmistakable smell of death permeates the air.

    A White House statement declares that Obama “offered, on behalf of the United States, to do everything we can to help alleviate the suffering and provide assistance to the relief operation.”

    Telecommunications are difficult in the hard hit region, roads are cut off, bridges down and the hardest-hit area, including Padang, lacks power and other services. In addition, heavy rainfall has hindered search and rescue efforts of those lost and burried under rubble.

    “Aftershocks can be just as devastating as the initial quake,” said Adjie Fachrurrazi, emergency response coordinator in Indonesia for the CARE aid organization, in a statement. “After an earthquake of this size, we know the immediate needs are going to be getting safe water, food and emergency supplies to the survivors. The question now is: How bad is it? We’re hoping for the best, but the information so far is not looking good.”

    Earlier this month, an earthquake in West Java killed 57 people. This region has had it share of disasters.


    Indonesia UPDATE:4000 Buried Under Earthquake Rubble | Baby Boomer Advisor Club|Baby Boomer Health and News
     
  5. Pintu

    Pintu New Member

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    The Associated Press: Indonesian villagers use bare hands to dig corpses

    Indonesian villagers use bare hands to dig corpses

    By ERIC TALMADGE and IRWAN FIRDAUS (AP) – 3 hours ago

    JUMANAK, Indonesia — With no outside help in sight, villagers used their bare hands Sunday to dig out rotting corpses, four days after landslides triggered by a huge earthquake obliterated four hamlets in western Indonesia.

    Officials said at least 644 people were buried and presumed dead in the hillside villages in Padang Pariaman district on the western coast of Sumatra island. If confirmed it would raise the death toll in Wednesday's 7.6-magnitude earthquake to more than 1,300, with about 3,000 missing.

    The extent of the disaster in remote villages was only now becoming clear. So far, aid and rescue efforts have been concentrated in the region's capital, Padang, a city of 900,000 people where several tall buildings collapsed.

    But the quake was equally devastating in the hills of Pariaman, where entire hillsides were shaken loose, sending a cascade of mud, rocks and trees through at least four villages.

    Vice President Jusuf Kalla said there was little hope of finding anyone alive.

    "We can be sure that they are dead. So now we are waiting for burials," he told reporters.

    Where the villages once stood, there was only mud and broken palm trees — the mountainsides appeared gouged bare as if by a gigantic backhoe.

    The villages "were sucked 30 meters (100 feet) deep into the earth," said Rustam Pakaya, the head of Indonesia's Health Ministry crisis center. "Even the mosque's minaret, taller than 20 meters (65 feet), disappeared."

    In Jumanak village, some 200 to 300 wedding guests at a restaurant were buried alive, including the bride, her 15-year-old brother, Iseh, told The Associated Press.

    He said his sister Ichi, 19, had come back to the village for her wedding.

    "When the landslide came, the party had just finished. I heard a big boom of the avalanche. I ran outside and saw the trees fall down," said Iseh, who like many Indonesians uses only one name.

    "I tried to get in front of the house with my brothers. We were so afraid. Landslides started coming from all directions. I just ran and then I waited," he said.

    Iseh says he knows of only 10 people from the village who survived. He doesn't know the fate of his parents or brothers.

    The adjacent villages of Pulau Aiya, Lubuk Lawe and Limo Koto Timur were also swept away.

    Survivors in the area said no government aid or search teams had arrived, even four days after the quake. Only about 20 local policemen had come with a power shovel and body bags.

    "My relatives were all killed, washed away by the landslide," said Dola Jambak, a 48-year-old trader, picking through the rubble of his house. "I lost seven relatives. Now all I can do is wait for the search teams. But they don't come."

    The landslides cut off all roads, and the villages were accessible only by foot. An AP team reached Jumanak after walking about four miles (six kilometers) for 1 1/2 hours.

    Villagers gathered as men used their bare hands to slowly and cautiously pull corpses from a tangle of roots and grit. The bodies were bloated and mutilated, some unrecognizable. One man's body was found because his hand was sticking out of the mud.

    Women wept silently as bodies were placed in bright yellow bags.

    Aid also had not reached Agam district, which is much closer to Padang.

    Laila, a villager in Agam district, said she and hundreds of others had no food, clothes and clean water.

    "Our house is gone ... everything is gone," she sobbed.

    She said a helicopter dropped some instant noodle packets Saturday. "But we need clean water to cook it," said Laila, who also uses one name. She said the local river had become dirty as people were using it wash.

    In Padang, rescuers have all but given up hope of finding any survivors in the rubble of the 140-room, Dutch-colonial style Ambacang Hotel. Some 200 people were in the hotel when it collapsed. Search teams have found 29 bodies so far, and no one alive.

    "After four days ... to find survivors is almost impossible," said Lt. Col. Harris, the chief of the 50-member rescue team, which comprises military, police and Red Cross personnel. "The smell of decomposing bodies is very strong," said Harris, who uses one name.

    According to the National Disaster Management Agency, 83,712 houses, 200 public buildings and 285 schools were destroyed. Another 100,000 buildings and 20 miles (31 kilometers) of road were badly damaged, and five bridges had collapsed.

    Meanwhile, hundreds of doctors, nurses, search and rescue experts and cleanup crews arrived Saturday at the Padang airport from around the world with tons of food, tents, medicine, clean water, generators and a field hospital.

    But with no electricity, fuel shortages and telecommunication outages, the massive operation was chaotic.

    Deliveries came on C-130 cargo planes from the United States, Russia and Australia. Japanese, Swiss, South Korean and Malaysian search and rescue teams scoured the debris. Tens of millions of dollars in donations came from more than a dozen countries to supplement $400 million the Indonesian government said it would spend over the next two months.

    The U.N. said there are sufficient fuel stocks in the area for four days, but with the road to a major depot cut off by landslides, gasoline prices had jumped six-fold.

    Areas with "huge levels of damage to infrastructure were in need of basic food and tents for temporary shelter," it said.

    Wednesday's quake originated on the same fault line that spawned the 2004 Asian tsunami that killed 230,000 people in a dozen nations.

    On Sunday, a 5.5-magnitude earthquake shook the eastern province of West Papua, the U.S. Geological Survey said. There were no reports of casualties. The quake's epicenter was 128 kilometers (80 kilometers) northwest of the provincial capital of Manokawar, the only major center of inhabitation. The region is about 3,500 kilometers (2160 miles) from Sumatra.

    Associated Press writers Ali Kotarumalos, Anthony Deutsch, Niniek Karmini and Vijay Joshi in Jakarta contributed to this report.
     
  6. Pintu

    Pintu New Member

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    http://www.ptinews.com/news/313012_Hopes-fade-for-Indonesian-quake-victims

    Hopes fade for Indonesian quake victims

    STAFF WRITER 11:1 HRS IST

    Padang (Indonesia), Oct 4 (AFP) Rescuers held out scant hope today for Indonesian quake survivors, handing recovery teams the grim task of retrieving the decaying bodies of some 4,000 victims believed buried in rubble.

    More international rescue teams arrived with sniffer dogs and specialist equipment on the fourth day after the 7.6-magnitude quake, with large areas still unexplored. But few experts expected to pluck out people alive.

    In Padang, a vast team dug at the Ambacang hotel, a focus for rescue efforts, where hopes had been raised for survivors yesterday after police received a mobile text message supposedly from someone inside.

    "I think the chances of finding survivors are very slim," the team leader of Newmont Emergency Rescue Team, Samsubin, told AFP at the scene of the ruined Dutch colonial-era hotel.
     
  7. Pintu

    Pintu New Member

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    The Associated Press: Heavy rains hold up search for bodies in Indonesia

    Heavy rains hold up search for bodies in Indonesia

    By ERIC TALMADGE and IRWAN FIRDAUS (AP) – 43 minutes ago

    JUMANAK, Indonesia — Search teams lost hope of finding any more survivors under the rubble left by a massive earthquake, as torrential rains on Sunday held up aid delivery in the remote hills of western Indonesia where several villages were wiped out.

    Rescue teams instead focused on retrieving the rotting bodies from the rubble of the magnitude 7.6 earthquake in Sumatra island, setting up tents for the tens of thousands of homeless and providing them food and drinking water.

    Vice President Jusuf Kalla said there was little hope of finding anyone alive.

    "We can be sure that they are dead. So now we are waiting for burials," he told reporters.

    There is no clear word on the death toll. The United Nations put the figure at 1,100. The government earlier said 715 were dead and 3,000 were missing. But it revised the figure Sunday to 603 confirmed killed and 960 missing, presumably dead.

    "With each passing day, the magnitude of the devastation grows," said Mark Fritzler, Save the Children aid group's Indonesia head.

    "In addition to the threat of aftershocks, heavy rainfall has challenged our efforts, roads are cut off and we have no power in many areas, but relief workers are reaching families in the hardest hit areas," he said.

    The missing include 644 people who were buried alive in four villages in the hills of Padang Pariaman district that were swept away by landslides caused by the quake. Among the victims were 200 to 300 guests at a wedding party in Jumanak village.

    The restaurant where the party was being held was damaged but largely intact. A slice of the green wedding cake lay untouched on a plate, covered with flies. The guests were apparently killed when they ran outside as the ground began to tremble but were swept away by the landslide 40 yards (meters) away.

    Iseh, a 15-year-old boy, said his sister, Ichi, was the bride. She, the groom and most of the guests were killed.

    He said Ichi, 19, had come back to the village for her wedding.

    "When the landslide came, the party had just finished. I heard a big boom of the avalanche. I ran outside and saw the trees fall down," Iseh, who like many Indonesians uses only one name, told The Associated Press.

    "I tried to get in front of the house with my brothers. We were so afraid. Landslides started coming from all directions. I just ran and then I waited," he said.

    On Sunday, hordes of aid workers, military personnel, police and volunteers finally reached the villages, bringing with them heavy earth moving equipment, relieving villagers who had been digging for the rotting corpses with bare hands while surrounded by the stench of death.

    But by early afternoon a heavy downpour lashed the area, raising fears of fresh landslides. Police ordered all residents, aid workers, journalists and volunteers to leave. The exodus — on motorcycles, cars and trucks — caused a massive traffic jam on the two-lane road to Padang, the provincial capital that was also badly hit.

    The quake had shaken loose entire hillsides, sending a cascade of mud, rocks and trees through Jumanak, Pulau Aiya, Lubuk Lawe and Limo Koto Timur.

    Where the villages once stood, there was only mud and broken palm trees — the mountainsides appeared gouged bare as if by a gigantic backhoe. The stench of decomposing bodies was pervasive in the lush green surroundings.

    "We are trying to assess the logistics of bringing in supplies especially food," said Gede Suweda, who came to Jumanak with a six-member Sai Rescue team from Bali.

    "We have food in Medan and we are trying to work out how to bring it here as quickly as we can. We came to this village because we heard it was very badly hit. But we are not sure of the extent of the deaths or the needs of the people," he said.

    In Padang, rescuers gave up hope of finding any survivors in the rubble of the 140-room, Dutch-colonial style Ambacang Hotel. Some 200 people were in the hotel when it collapsed. Search teams have found 29 bodies so far, and no one alive.

    "After four days ... to find survivors is almost impossible," said Lt. Col. Harris, the chief of the 50-member rescue team, which comprises military, police and Red Cross personnel. "The smell of decomposing bodies is very strong," said Harris, who uses one name.

    According to the National Disaster Management Agency, 83,712 houses, 200 public buildings and 285 schools were destroyed. Another 100,000 buildings and 20 miles (31 kilometers) of road were badly damaged, and five bridges had collapsed.

    Save the Children said it has distributed more than 450 tarps and plastic sheets as well as 450 hygiene kits filled with toothpaste, shampoo and bandages to two villages, 30 miles (50 kilometers) outside Padang.

    "We need to make sure hygiene is kept up because in situations like these children are a lot more prone to disease," said Jon Bugge, emergency communication director at the U.S.-based nonprofit.

    The group estimates that children account for around 50 percent of those displaced by the earthquake. It said tens of thousands of children are at risk of hunger and diseases. Many children are believed to be separated from their parents.

    Wednesday's quake originated on the same fault line that spawned the 2004 Asian tsunami that killed 230,000 people in a dozen nations.

    Associated Press writers Ali Kotarumalos, Anthony Deutsch, Niniek Karmini and Vijay Joshi in Jakarta contributed to this report.
     

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