597 military personnel have committed suicide in last 5 years

Discussion in 'Indian Army' started by Neo, Jul 23, 2014.

  1. Neo

    Neo Senior Member Senior Member

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    597 Indian military personnel have committed suicide in last 5 years


    NEW DELHI: The suicide toll in the highly-disciplined armed forces continues to cross the 100-mark year after year despite all the so-called measures being undertaken by the defence establishment to reduce stress among soldiers.

    As many as 597 military personnel committed suicide in 5 years between 2009 and 2013.

    Disclosing these figures in the Rajya Sabha on Tuesday, defence minister Arun Jaitely said, "The government has taken various measures to create an appropriate environment for defence personnel, so that they can perform their duty without any mental stress."

    These measures, said Jaitley, include improvement in living and working conditions through provision of better infrastructure and facilities, additional family accommodation, liberalized leave policy, a grievance redressal mechanism, psychological counseling and conduct of yoga and meditation as part of a battalion or unit's routine.

    But the steps do not seem to be working very well on the ground.

    In the Army, by far the largest of the three services, for instance, 116 soldiers committed suicide in 2010, 105 in 2011 and 95 in 2012. Last year, while 86 soldiers committed suicide, the figure for airmen and sailors stood at 15 and 6.

    As reported by TOI earlier, stress-related cases in the shape of suicides and "fragging" (to kill or wound a fellow-soldier or superior) incidents have shown no signs of abating, and often also lead to disquiet and "clashes'' between officers and jawans.

    Soldiers posted in far-flung areas often undergo tremendous mental stress for not being able to take care of the problems being faced by their families back home, which could range from property disputes and harassment by anti-social elements to financial and marital problems.

    While prolonged deployment in counter-insurgency operations in J&K and northeast also takes a toll on the physical endurance and mental health of soldiers, it's compounded by poor salaries, lack of basic amenities, ineffectual leadership and sometimes humiliation at the hands of their officers.

    Though former defence minister AK Antony had repeatedly asked state chief ministers and Union Territory lieutenant governors to make their civil district administrations more responsive to grievances of soldiers and their families, the situation remains almost the same.

    "One of the biggest worries for jawans is the hardships their families face ... civil administrators do not pay much attention to their problems," said an officer.

    http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/i...w/38873826.cms
     
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  3. Neo

    Neo Senior Member Senior Member

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    Heart attacks and suicides...what's going on??
     
  4. Virendra

    Virendra Moderator Moderator

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    I don't see any heart attacks mentioned in the article. It does talk about the fatigue and familiy issues causing suicides though.
     
  5. Neo

    Neo Senior Member Senior Member

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  6. Virendra

    Virendra Moderator Moderator

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    I think the two are not connected.
    Army faces suicides due to personal issues of soldiers and sometimes the pressure/fatigue at work. The omni-present issue of work-life balance.
    What ITBP is experiencing is a physical health issue, because of food habits of jawans being incompatible to high altitude areas where they're posted.

    Regards,
    Virendra
     
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  7. Neo

    Neo Senior Member Senior Member

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    Agreed that they are not connecred but how serious is this phenomena and how is it affecting IA's preparedness?

    Do we have stats from other countries like China, Russia, USA or UK to compare?
     
  8. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    A variety of reasons.

    Pressures of the modern age and psychology.

    It does not affect preparedness or operational efficiency.
     
  9. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    It could be from acute hypoxia.

    Acute hypoxia is a sudden or rapid depletion in available oxygen at the tissue level. The condition may result from asphyxia, airway obstruction, acute hemorrhage, blockage of alveoli by edema or infectious exudate, or abrupt cardiorespiratory failure. Clinical signs may include hypoventilation or hyperventilation to the point of air hunger and neurologic deficits ranging from headache and confusion to loss of consciousness.

    The consequences of acute hypoxia are an increase in heart rate (both at rest and on exercise), myocardial contractility, and cardiac output for the first few days. With acclimatization, cardiac output falls at rest and on exercise in association with a decrease in left ventricular work but an increase in right ventricular work.

    The increase in heart rate is related to increased sympathetic activity and vagal withdrawal.

    @bennedose is a specialist in medicine. He may elaborate.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 10, 2015
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  10. Neo

    Neo Senior Member Senior Member

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    Thank you for scientific reasoning, useful info indeed.
    Did you or your men experience any of these in your 37 years of service in Kashmir? You must have served on extreme altitudes I assune.
     
  11. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    Correct acclimatisation is the best way to ensure that all goes well.

    I have served many a time in HAA (High Altitude Area).

    Most fatality is caused by a gung ho approach and poor acclimatisation.

    The most useful slogan that should reverberate in the mind as one goes about his work in HAA is - In the Land of the Lama, don't try to be a Gama.

    [​IMG]
     
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  12. Ashutosh Lokhande

    Ashutosh Lokhande Senior Member Senior Member

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    any stats about pak army? or they dont share it in public?
     
  13. Neo

    Neo Senior Member Senior Member

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    No, I don't. I've never heard of such problems with PA.
     
  14. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    Good thing.

    so, in PA things are hunky dory.
     
  15. bennedose

    bennedose Senior Member Senior Member

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    Ray it could well be hypoxia, but the correct way forward is to correlate post-mortem reports on each of the deceased men with earlier health check up reports.

    As for suicides - 597 per 5 years in a 1 million plus man army is 0.1 per 1000 per year. This is about the same rate as the suicide rate in the general population in India.
     
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  16. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    Why does it not afflict the Pak Army?

    Pak Army or media has not raised such issue or so they say.

    Is it that their food and physical characteristics superior to normal people?
     
  17. bennedose

    bennedose Senior Member Senior Member

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    Nonsense. Of course Pakistanis are a superior people fairskinned and tightassed compared with me. I am a short dark skinned cowardly Indian who wears only dhotis, eats rice, will cheat honorable Pakistanis and will run at the sound of gunfire.

    I have read news reports of suicides the Pakistan army - they just don't publicize anything negative. The funniest part is that if you try to Google for "suicide + Pakistan army" you will find hundreds of news items of suicide bombers attacking the Pakistan army. Better to Google for "Pakistan army morale" - there is quite a lot of that.
     
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