1987 elections frustrated Kashmir valley youth: Governor

Discussion in 'Internal Security' started by ejazr, Mar 30, 2012.

  1. ejazr

    ejazr Stars and Ambassadors Stars and Ambassadors

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    1987 elections frustrated valley youth Governor Lastupdate:- Sun, 12 Feb 2012 18:30:00 GMT GreaterKashmir.com

    Srinagar, Feb 11: Governor NN Vohra on Saturday said the Kashmiri youth were being alienated and frustrated by ‘worrying political happenings’ in the past including 1987 elections that prompted violent reaction from them and changed the political discourse thereafter.
    “Post 1970 years were very eventful that changed the political discourse and later the worrying elections of 1987 frustrated the Kashmiri youth,” he said while chairing a panel discussion on ‘Kashmiri Youth and Media: A Perception Survey’ at a hotel here.
    Speaking on the occasion, Vohra admitted said the time had come for shifting full attention to governance issues. “Our concern this time should be to provide a space to youth to engage them productively,” he said.

    Governor said the recent Home Ministry survey had tried to touch some of the important points vis-à-vis Kashmir. “It should be treated as a starting point. However there are certain areas which were left out in the survey like pre-1990 period,” he said. Much more needs to be done to carry this exercise forward, he added.

    “There is a need to conduct such surveys in far-flung districts with a much larger sample size,” Vohra said.

    The panel discussion was organized by the Institute for Research on Indian and International Studies in the backdrop of releasing its study report regarding media impact on Kashmiri youth conducted by its honorary director Navnita Chadha Behera. “The idea of the research was to understand the usage and impact of media and other communication channels available to the youth in Kashmir. And one important thing which comes out of it is the realization that we need to engage youth. There is a need to give them sense of security and democratic freedom,” Behera said.

    She pointed to the total opaque system under which the media was functioning in Kashmir. “There is no such thing as Audit Bureau of Circulation in Kashmir. There is no way to know circulation of newspapers or reach of the electronic media,” she observed.
    According to her the research has also found that use of force by government and booking youth under various laws like Public Safety Act (PSA) keep them at bay from political rallies and mass protests.

    Other participants in the discussion including journalists and academicians were critical about the timing and language of the survey report. “This is the first survey that tries to know the media usage in Kashmir but the vocabulary used in the report is confusing as it doesn’t put the statement made in it into perspective,” said BBC’s Kashmir Correspondent Riyaz Masroor.

    Quoting an example from the report, Masroor said the finding that Kashmir youth is turning to Islam has been misrepresented in the report. “This statement creates confusion in the minds of people. We were religious before also and the frame in which this point was made doesn’t clarify the finding,” he said.

    Journalist Bashir Manzar said the survey should have incorporated the perception of youth living outside Jammu and Kashmir. “The next generation of Kashmir is moving towards New Delhi and other parts of India but rather than becoming the ambassadors they return with bitter experience of harassment and assault. So government has to think over the issue,” he said.

    Academician Prof Neera Chandhoke expressed her views on the genesis of Nation States in the international context, the glorious pluralistic traditions of Kashmir and the significance of Article 370 of the Constitution of India.
    “Kashmir issue and aspiration of valley people should be thoroughly discussed at the academic level and at social science forums to get the clear understanding about it,” she said.

    Prominent among those present on the occasion were Vice-Chancellor, SK University of Agricultural Sciences and Technology, Dr. Tej Partap, Divisional Commissioner, Kashmir, Asgar H Samoon, Editor-in-Chief, The Tribune, R. Chengappa, journalist Ahmad Ali Fayaz, academicians from Kashmir University and Islamic University, businessmen and social activists.
     
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  3. ejazr

    ejazr Stars and Ambassadors Stars and Ambassadors

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    1987 elections most unfortunate in Kashmir history: Vohra - RisingKashmir.com

    ‘It was the beginning of many problems including militancy’

    ISHFAQ TANTRY
    SRINAGAR, FEB 11: Terming 1987 assembly election as most unfortunate event in the modern history of Jammu and Kashmir, Governor N N Vohra Saturday said this was the cause for many problems including militancy that State is confronting today.

    “The period surrounding 1975 India-Abdullah accord is important. Many troubles took place after that accord. The 1986 agreement and the 1987 elections were the most unfortunate events in Kashmir history. These events led to eruption of militancy in the State,” Vohra said while speaking during a discussion over a survey conducted on Kashmir youth and media by Institute for Research on India and International Studies (IRIIS). He said this period was the beginning of many problems the State is facing today. “Many of these problems have been solved and some are in the process of being solved,” he said.
    Commenting on survey, Vohra regretted that two most important districts of Kashmir have not been included in the survey. “Though many districts have been covered under the survey but why two important districts of Kashmir -- Shopian and Kupwara - have been excluded,” he questioned.
    The six districts covered in the survey include Srinagar, Budgam, Islamabad, Kulgam, Bandipora and Baramulla.

    Governor wondered over the findings of the survey which claimed that state –run TV/Radio channels including DD News/DD Kashmir score the highest rank for providing news and entertainment to the Kashmiri youth. “I wonder how you say that 74 percent rely on official channels for news. This has really amused me. Most people in Kashmir do have official channels available but they devote great deal of time to the private TV channels including local media for news and current affairs”, he said while digging holes in the controversial study.

    Commenting on parts of study that only 9 percent youth know correct political status of Gilgit, Baltistan and Northern Areas, Vohra said even many serious people at Delhi don’t know Northern Areas or the full meaning of term Azadi. “I am afraid that even many people, who really matter, might not be knowing the true meaning of Azadi. Even well known political figures with whom I have interacted have not been able to define Azadi to me,” he said.
    On findings of study that there is a perceptible trend that an increasing number of youth in Kashmir are turning to Islam in many ways, Vohra said, “It should not be a matter of concern. 90 percent of the population in Valley is Muslim and where will they go. Obviously they will go to mosques. Besides, in view of the prevailing situation in Valley owing to turmoil, there is rather a forcible urge to evolve a distinct Kashmiri identity”.

    Regretting that very less attention has been focused on the governance issues in the survey, he said lack of governance also manifests in the form of frustration by the Valley youth. “If the functions of an administrative system do not make a visible impact, the net result is frustration of the youth. Therefore, the governance issue is more important than religion. Let us not get worried about religion,” he said.

    “As highlighted in the survey, quoting 2001 census figures, 46 percent of J&K population comprises youth. Therefore, youth in J&K will and shall remain the most important segment of our focus and attention”, Governor said in his opening remarks after the brief contours and recommendations of the survey were narrated by Honorary Director, IRIIS Prof Navnita Chadha Behera, the main author of the study on Kashmir youth and media carried out by the IRIIS in six districts of Kashmir valley, wherein around 1500 youth were posed a set of 59 open ended questions in January 2011.
    Besides Vohra, Prof Neera Chandhoke, Bashir Manzar ( Editor Kashmir Images), Riyaz Masroor (journalist) also took part in the discussion. The audience included Divisional Commissioner Asghar Samoon, Peoples conference chairman Sajjad Lone, former Srinagar mayor Salman Sagar, Ahmad Ali Fayaz (Journalist), Raj Cehngappa (Editor in Chief Triune), Ehsan Fazili (journalist), Prof Gul Wani, Muslim Jan, Nasir Mirza and Shahid Rasool.
    Riyaz Masroor in his presentation focused on the role of religion in shaping identities in Kashmir. “Sufi and spiritual Islam has been the intrinsic form of religion in Kashmir,” he said.

    Supporting the recommendations of the study that local media should be regulated, he, however, did not agree with the idea of having a Public Broadcasting Service for Kashmir as recommended in the survey. Bashir Manzar said it is very important to understand the youth, their needs and tastes as they were the most important factor of the society. Commenting on the findings that majority of the Kashmir youth detest violence by giving preference to peaceful way of expression, he said, “How come more than 100 youth were killed by forces in 2010.”

    “If according to the study 70 percent youth are against violence, then why more than 100 youth were killed in 2010”, Manzar questioned. At the end, the presentations were followed by a question and answer session, in which majority of the audience participated.
     
  4. devgupt

    devgupt Regular Member

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    Syed Salauddin was a candidate in 87 elections. When counting was took place, after initial rounds of counting , he was leading. Remember in those ballot box days, it says used to take 2 days to get complete results. It is said that before the final round of counting , he and his supporters began to celebrate , and left the counting booth. By the time the final round of counting finished,the leads were turned on head - he lost narrowly.
    Few days later an angry Salauddin left for Pakistan and formed Hizbul Mujahideen- the biggest Kashmiri terrorist group today

    Delhi has done many self goals in Kashmir.
     
  5. Yusuf

    Yusuf GUARDIAN Administrator

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    If Salauddib had won, the other guy would have felt aggrieved and for to Pak and started a "Hizb".

    Don't justify anything here.

    The same has happened in the rest of the country too. Differed areas had different ballot boxes and if some areas were pro one person in large numbers and that was the last boxes to be counted then sure the vote would swing wildly.
     
  6. devgupt

    devgupt Regular Member

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    It was not an isolated incident. 1987 elections were heavily rigged - read what the governor is saying and he is not the first person to say that. Any Kashmir observer would tell the same.

    When Farooq Abdullah was CM, Congress encouraged his disgruntled brother - in-law to split NC in 1984.
    As was the common scenario faced by non-congress govt those days those days, Farooq was not given a chance to prove his majority and Ghulam Mohammed Shah was sworn in. Farooq realising the futility of making Congress an enemy formed an alliance with it. Ghulam Mohammed Shah was dumped and elections announced in 1987.And those were massively rigged.

    Ultimately it became clear that the government's stay in Kashmir at Delhi's whim.This broke the belief of youth there in democracy.Youths went to Pakistan and valley erupted in 1989.

    Was it the only reason for insurgency - no. But like the cow/pig meat bullets of 1857 Indian war of independence , it was the spark which burnt the jungle
     
    Last edited: Mar 30, 2012
  7. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    One should read Jagmohan's 'My Frozen Turbulence' to understand what corruption means.

    However, corruption and maladministration is nothing new to Kashmir. It is historical.One should read Lawrence's 'The Vale of Kashmir' if one wants to understand Kashmiris and Kashmir. It has been written long ago, but if one reads it, especially those who know Kashmir, one finds that time seems to have stood still and nothing has changed!
     
  8. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    I agree with Devgupt that political chicanery that has been practised by the Centre in so far as Kashmir goes is the bedrock to all the issues that plague Kashmir.
     
  9. anoop_mig25

    anoop_mig25 Senior Member Senior Member

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    what is outcome of this result.initially reading says its partial to GoI eg "state –run TV/Radio channels including DD News/DD Kashmir score the highest rank for providing news and entertainment to the Kashmiri youth" or even this "Kashmir youth is turning to Islam " .

    has something changed in kashmir or its get worse. i mean after successive abdullah gov kashmir situation gets worse
     
  10. ejazr

    ejazr Stars and Ambassadors Stars and Ambassadors

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    The only free and fair elections held in J&K were the 1951 when Sheikh Abdullah ratified the union with India after winning the elections post independence, 1975 after Abdullah was released from prison by Indira Gandhi before the militancy broke out. Remember in the 1980s, states all over India were gearing against Indira Gandhi when she started dismissing anti-Congress state govt. left right and centre.

    It was not until the 2000s under the NDA rule under Vajpayee that the next set of free and fair elections were held. If we allow this process to continue as it should without interference from New Delhi as has been the case historically, the self correcting mechanism of elections will allow the grievances to be addressed.

    But certainly the Governor is doing the right thing by acknowledging past mistakes and pledging to not allow this to happen again.
     
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  11. ejazr

    ejazr Stars and Ambassadors Stars and Ambassadors

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    Its a very general purpose survey and I could not get a source copy of the results. The think tank website is also not that good and just has the cover of the survey in pdf format which is weird.


    I think the most important part of the survey that is relevant for us is that this is only a Kashmir valley survey that represents around 50% of the total J&K population.

    Out of that 50% (or 25% of the total J&K) population want some sort of "Azadi". This includes Azadi from military rule, from corruption, from discrimination in other parts of India, more autonomy e.t.c.

    Most importantly, 11% of the Valley youth or 5.5% of the total J&K population wanted Azadi from Indian rule or complete secession.
     
  12. ejazr

    ejazr Stars and Ambassadors Stars and Ambassadors

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    Found a report with some more details on the percentages.

    The Tribune, Chandigarh, India - Jammu & Kashmir

    Srinagar, February 11
    Seventy-five per cent Kashmiri youths are not in favour of the gun culture and feel peaceful protest is the most effective way of achieving political aspirations, claims a perception survey by the Institute for Research on Indian and International Studies.

    The survey, “Media Impact on the Kashmiri Youth”, was released at a one-day seminar chaired by Governor NN Vohra here today amidst a galaxy of journalists, intellectuals, students and members of the civil society.

    The survey, having a sample of youth aged between 15 and 35 from six districts - Anantnag, Budgam, Bandipora, Baramulla, Kulgam and Srinagar - reveals lack of governance as the main concern.

    As many as 33 per cent of around 1,500 youths have ranked corruption as the most important issue facing Kashmir at this juncture.

    The second major concern is the violation of human rights, with 15 per cent of the respondents listing it in the survey.

    In what may bring cheer to the Kashmiri Pandits, who were forced to leave the Valley in the early 1990s, as many as 67 per cent of the respondents believe the Pandits “should” return to the Valley. Though, only 18 per cent of them have revealed that they have publicly supported their return by either taking part in a public rally, posting online, via a political party or Hurriyat. The report presented by Navnita Chadha Behera, honorary director, IRIIS, specifically mentions that among the 29 per cent respondents opposing the return of the Kashmiri Pandits, over 41 per cent are under 19 years of age, which meant they were born after the exodus of the KPs from the Valley and had little exposure to the secular traditions of Kashmir.

    The survey further states that the current generation is different from the predecessors, as the present lot is more inward looking. They have fixed their political gaze on developments within Jammu and Kashmir. Nearly 70 to 90 per cent youths like to watch or read news about Kashmir than anything else.

    Their interest in happenings in neighbouring Pakistan is also waning. The perception about Pakistan of being a friend, philosopher and guide has diminished in the minds of today’s youth, as only 16 per cent listen to news about Pakistan. Only in Bandipora, the figure is high at 42 per cent.

    The youth do not have an encouraging connect with India either. Not more than 26 per cent follow news on India from different sources.

    A significant 54 per cent youth list “azadi” as the final political status of Kashmir. But their notions of “azadi” vary. Nearly 20 per cent say it means political rights, while 14 per cent say it is civic rights. For just 11 per cent, “azadi” means freedom from India, while a whopping 30 per cent say it implies partition of Kashmir.

    Further, 10 per cent say it is about withdrawal of Army and eight per cent see it as sovereign Kashmir, including the PoK. For just 1 per cent, it means merger with Pakistan.

    Also, television and radio are the most popular source of news and entertainment for the Kashmiri youth, the report adds. The state-run DD News/DD Kashir, All-India Radio and Radio Kashmir are watched by 74 per cent of the youth.

    Local channels, many of which have been banned from telecasting news, are viewed by 49 per cent, while 43 per cent view western channels and 41 per cent watch Indian private channels.

    Nearly 60 per cent Kashmiri youths read both English and Urdu local dailies, while only 17 per cent opt for national dailies.

    The survey says Internet, especially Facebook, is fast gaining popularity, with as many 101 Facebook pages on Kashmir coming up in recent times.
     
  13. mayfair

    mayfair Elite Member Elite Member

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    Partition of Kashmir? What in the blazes does that mean?
     
  14. balai_c

    balai_c Regular Member

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    Probably it means separation of ladakh and jammu from kashmir valley, the real kashmir.
     
  15. SLASH

    SLASH Senior Member Senior Member

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    It is in India's interest to have a state government speaking the centre's words in kashmir. It is sad but logically step taken by our government. We cannot have an anti-India state government.
     
  16. mayfair

    mayfair Elite Member Elite Member

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    Frustration aisi ki..

    Need I say more...
     
  17. amitkriit

    amitkriit Senior Member Senior Member

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    Elections have been rigged everywhere in past, had this been the deciding factor, whole country would have been broken up into 1000 pieces a long time back.

    Yes rigging of elections did have a negative impact, but the separatist tendencies were already present there, may be the 1987 event acted as a catalyst. There are other factors as well.
     
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  18. pankaj nema

    pankaj nema Senior Member Senior Member

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    Kashmiri Muslims are stupid that is all

    They wanted to merge with Pakistan ; Pakistan and Kashmiris BOTH have tried every trick in the book
    to win freedom but HINDUS of India will never let go of Kashmir

    The Kashmiri Muslims have raised the ante so much that EVEN if there is not a SINGLE stone thrown for
    the NEXT 10 years still India will keep 5 Lakh soldiers in Kashmir

    Because we dont trust the Kashmiris
     
  19. Singh

    Singh Phat Cat Administrator

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    Yes, 1987 elections were indeed a watershed movement. It has been universally accepted.
     
  20. pankaj nema

    pankaj nema Senior Member Senior Member

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    Kashmir is a place which is full of soldiers

    All you see is guns; Army vehicles ; security checkpoints

    The presence of security forces in Kashmir is deliberately staged as A SHOW OF Strength to
    tell the Kashmiris that look we own this place

    But who CREATED this situation who has invited this trouble and asked for all this overbearing
    presence of security men

    Kashmiris themselves by their stupid Azadi chants and unfurling of Paki flags in each house

    Let the Kashmiris suffer they deserve it
     
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  21. amitkriit

    amitkriit Senior Member Senior Member

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    Show courage, Show Honour but show no mercy on your enemies. They must suffer.
     

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