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India's Population 2012

  1. #1
    Seeker Vyom's Avatar
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    India's Population 2012

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    Current Population of India - India, with 1,220,200,000 (1.22 billion) people is the second most populous country in the world, while China is on the top with over 1,350,044,605 (1.35 billion) people. The figures show that India represents almost 17.31% of the world's population, which means one out of six people on this planet live in India. Although, the crown of the world's most populous country is on China's head for decades, India is all set to take the numero uno position by 2030. With the population growth rate at 1.58%, India is predicted to have more than 1.53 billion people by the end of 2030.

    More than 50% of India's current population is below the age of 25 and over 65% below the age of 35. About 72.2% of the population lives in some 638,000 villages and the rest 27.8% in about 5,480 towns and urban agglomerations. The birth rate (child births per 1,000 people per year) is 22.22 births/1,000 population (2009 est.) while death rate (deaths per 1000 individuals per year) is 6.4 deaths/1,000 population. Fertility rate is 2.72 children born/woman (NFHS-3, 2008) and Infant mortality rate is 30.15 deaths/1,000 live births (2009 estimated). India has the largest illiterate population in the world. The literacy rate of India as per 2001 Population Census is 65.38%, with male literacy rate at 75.96% and female at 54.28%. Kerala has the highest literacy rate at 90.86%, Mizoram (88.80%) is on the second position and Lakshadweep (86.66%) is on third.

    Every year, India adds more people than any other nation in the world, and in fact the individual population of some of its states is equal to the total population of many countries. For example, Population of Uttar Pradesh (state in India) almost equals to the population of Brazil. It, as per 2001 Population Census of India, has 190 million people and the growth rate is 16.16%. The population of the second most populous state Maharashtra, which has a growth rate of 9.42%, is equal to that of Mexico's population. Bihar, with 8.07%, is the third most populous state in India and its population is more than Germany's. West Bengal with 7.79% growth rate, Andhra Pradesh (7.41%) and Tamil Nadu (6.07%) are at fourth, fifth and sixth positions respectively. The sex ratio of India stands at 933. Kerala with 1058 females per 1000 males is the state with the highest female sex ratio. Pondicherry (1001) is second, while Chhatisgarh (990) and Tamil Nadu (986) are at third and fourth places respectively. Haryana with 861 has the lowest female sex ratio.

    Some of the reasons for India's rapidly growing population are poverty, illiteracy, high fertility rate, rapid decline in death rates or mortality rates and immigration from Bangladesh and Nepal. Alarmed by its swelling population, India started taking measures to stem the growth rate quite early. In fact India by launching the National Family Planning programme in 1952 became the first country in the world to have a population policy. The family planning programme yielded some noticeable results, bringing down significantly the country's fertility rate. In 1965-2009, the contraceptive usage more than tripled and the fertility rate more than halved. The efforts did produce positive results, however, failed to achieve the ultimate goal and the population of India since getting independence from Britain in 1947 increased almost three times. Whereas India has missed almost all its targets to bring the rate of population growth under control, China's 'One Child Policy' in 1978, has brought tremendous results for the latter. The policy claims to have prevented between 250 and 300 million births from 1978 to 2000 and 400 million births from 1979 to 2010.

    404394 375000892517243 100000220054835 1699800 1950623596 n


    › See More: India's Population 2012
    All actions that end in the well-being of the society are the only actions that produce self-beneficial results.

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    Seeker Vyom's Avatar
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    How long can we sustain such massive population, why is this never an issue in elections?
    All actions that end in the well-being of the society are the only actions that produce self-beneficial results.

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    Can India Sustain Economic Growth Amidst Exploding Population and Depleting Resources

    India is expected to surpass China as the world's most populous nation by 2025. As the Indian population rises rapidly amidst its depleting land and water resources, the widespread hunger problem could grow worse unless serious steps are taken now to remedy the situation.

    The International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) reported last year that hunger in India has grown over the last three years.

    IFPRI said India's hunger index score has worsened over the last three years from 23.7 to 23.9 to 24.1 and its ranking moved from 66 to 65 to 67 on a list of 84 nations....while Pakistan's hunger index score has improved over the same period reported since 2008 from 21.7 (2008) to 21.0 (2009) to 19.1 (2010) and its ranking has risen from 61 to 58 to 52.

    India2BPoverty2BNREGA

    In 2011, the situation in India is only getting worse with double-digit food inflation and growing shortages of basics like onions.

    With the growing population and worsening water shortages, the prognosis for hunger in India is not good, according to the author of National Geographics cover story in its latest issue on population.

    India is ranked 33rd and Pakistan 39th among the most overcrowded nations of the world by Overpopulation Index published by the Optimum Population Trust based in the United Kingdom. The index measures overcrowding based on the size of the population and the resources available to sustain it.

    India has a dependency percentage of 51.6 per cent on other nations and an ecological footprint of 0.77. The index calculates that India is overpopulated by 594.32 million people. Pakistan has a dependency percentage of 49.9 per cent on other nations and an ecological footprint of 0.75. The index calculates that Pakistan is overpopulated by 80 million people. Pakistan is less crowded than China (ranked 29), India (ranked 33) and the US (ranked 35), according to the index. Singapore is the most overcrowded and Bukina Faso the least on a list of 77 nations assessed by the Optimum Population Trust.

    India2Bpopulation

    Here are some excerpts from National Geographics' cover story "7 Billion and Counting":

    In 1966, when Ehrlich took that taxi ride, there were around half a billion Indians. There are 1.2 billion now. Delhi’s population has increased even faster, to around 22 million, as people have flooded in from small towns and villages and crowded into sprawling shantytowns. Early last June in the stinking hot city, the summer monsoon had not yet arrived to wash the dust from the innumerable construction sites, which only added to the dust that blows in from the deserts of Rajasthan. On the new divided highways that funnel people into the unplanned city, oxcarts were heading the wrong way in the fast lane. Families of four cruised on motorbikes, the women’s scarves flapping like vivid pennants, toddlers dangling from their arms. Families of a dozen or more sardined themselves into buzzing, bumblebee-colored auto rickshaws designed for two passengers. In the stalled traffic, amputees and wasted little children cried for alms. Delhi today is boomingly different from the city Ehrlich visited, and it is also very much the same.

    At Lok Nayak Hospital, on the edge of the chaotic and densely peopled nest of lanes that is Old Delhi, a human tide flows through the entrance gate every morning and crowds inside on the lobby floor. “Who could see this and not be worried about the population of India?” a surgeon named Chandan Bortamuly asked one afternoon as he made his way toward his vasectomy clinic. “Population is our biggest problem.” Removing the padlock from the clinic door, Bortamuly stepped into a small operating room. Inside, two men lay stretched out on examination tables, their testicles poking up through holes in the green sheets. A ceiling fan pushed cool air from two window units around the room.

    Bortamuly is on the front lines of a battle that has been going on in India for nearly 60 years. In 1952, just five years after it gained independence from Britain, India became the first country to establish a policy for population control. Since then the government has repeatedly set ambitious goals—and repeatedly missed them by a mile. A national policy adopted in 2000 called for the country to reach the replacement fertility of 2.1 by 2010. That won’t happen for at least another decade. In the UN’s medium projection, India’s population will rise to just over 1.6 billion people by 2050. “What’s inevitable is that India is going to exceed the population of China by 2030,” says A. R. Nanda, former head of the Population Foundation of India, an advocacy group. “Nothing less than a huge catastrophe, nuclear or otherwise, can change that.”

    Sterilization is the dominant form of birth control in India today, and the vast majority of the procedures are performed on women. The government is trying to change that; a no-scalpel vasectomy costs far less and is easier on a man than a tubal ligation is on a woman. In the operating theater Bortamuly worked quickly. “They say the needle pricks like an ant bite,” he explained, when the first patient flinched at the local anesthetic. “After that it’s basically painless, bloodless surgery.” Using the pointed tip of a forceps, Bortamuly made a tiny hole in the skin of the scrotum and pulled out an oxbow of white, stringy vas deferens—the sperm conduit from the patient’s right testicle. He tied off both ends of the oxbow with fine black thread, snipped them, and pushed them back under the skin. In less than seven minutes—a nurse timed him—the patient was walking out without so much as a Band-Aid. The government will pay him an incentive fee of 1,100 rupees (around $25), a week’s wages for a laborer.

    The Indian government tried once before to push vasectomies, in the 1970s, when anxiety about the population bomb was at its height. Prime Minister Indira Gandhi and her son Sanjay used state-of-emergency powers to force a dramatic increase in sterilizations. From 1976 to 1977 the number of operations tripled, to more than eight million. Over six million of those were vasectomies. Family planning workers were pressured to meet quotas; in a few states, sterilization became a condition for receiving new housing or other government benefits. In some cases the police simply rounded up poor people and hauled them to sterilization camps.

    The excesses gave the whole concept of family planning a bad name. “Successive governments refused to touch the subject,” says Shailaja Chandra, former head of the National Population Stabilisation Fund (NPSF). Yet fertility in India has dropped anyway, though not as fast as in China, where it was nose-diving even before the draconian one-child policy took effect. The national average in India is now 2.6 children per woman, less than half what it was when Ehrlich visited. The southern half of the country and a few states in the northern half are already at replacement fertility or below.

    In Kerala, on the southwest coast, investments in health and education helped fertility fall to 1.7. The key, demographers there say, is the female literacy rate: At around 90 percent, it’s easily the highest in India. Girls who go to school start having children later than ones who don’t. They are more open to contraception and more likely to understand their options.


    Read more: South Asia Investor Review: Can India Sustain Economic Growth Amidst Exploding Population and Depleting Resources?
    All actions that end in the well-being of the society are the only actions that produce self-beneficial results.

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    Re: India's Population 2012

    Population growth: The root cause of all problems

    Different people consider different things as cause of all their miseries. Those are corruption, violence, pollution, illiteracy etc. But all these things are high in districts, states and countries with high population growth. Poverty is high in Malabar region than other parts of Kerala because fertility rate of Malabar region is very high compared to other parts of Kerala. Poverty is less in Kerala than other states because fertility rate is less in Kerala than other states. Poverty is high in Africa than other parts of the World because fertility rate is high in Africa than other parts of the World.


    Its a fact that corruption and crime rate are directly proportional to fertility rate. Many people with more children are ready to work for sand and other mafias because they want to earn more money to feed their children. People will buy sand and bricks for constructing homes from cheap source irrespective of whether the source is illegal or Govt. approved. Some people are even ready to distribute fake currencies and help terrorists. They will vote for corrupt politicians to get peanut money. As most illiterate people are highly religious its easy for politicians to secure votes by forcing them to vow in front of holy books or idols.


    Many environmentalists protest against construction of resorts in ecologically fragile land claiming that it will cause environmental problems. But the fact is thousands of new homes are constructed in EFL when a resort is constructed there. Environmental problems caused due to construction of those homes will be many times higher than problems caused due to construction of a resort. Environmentalists are also protesting aganist mining of sand and rocks used for construction. But if we look around ourself we will see more houses than factories or shops. So if we control population growth then we can reduce enviornmental problems as we need to construct only less homes. Western countries don't need to create more jobs because their population growth is very less. But we need to create more jobs because our population growth is very high. Creating more jobs will cause more environmental problems.


    Due to high population growth many people are forced to live in barren land, ELF, flood prone areas, glaciers etc. Many people who live in barren land have to walk miles to bring drinking water. Many environmentalists who protest against factories in Kerala are claiming that we can construct factories in other states because they have enough barren lands. But the fact is if we construct factories in barren lands then size of barren land will increase and people who live there will be forced to walk more miles to bring water.


    Many religious fanatics claim that we need high population growth due to shortage of work force. But the fact is many people go abroad because there is not enough work here. Many people in western countries are lossing their jobs not because they don't have enough qualifications or skills. But because immigrants from countries like India are ready to do same job at lower rates. But this won't last long because governments in those countries will be forced to do what their citizens likes and not what immigrants likes. So they will either force companies to reserve more jobs to their citizens or impose huge tax on immigrants. The same religious fanatics, who claim that 'big family is happy family', are accusing illiterate and poor people who have more children for living luxurious life when they don't have money to feed their children. My question to them is if high population growth is good then why districts, states and countries with high population growth and more work force are facing more poverty than other places? Eventhough wages are high in developed countries, MNCs like to start factories there because enough land, raw materials and power are available there. They are not interested to construct factories here because we don't have enough land and raw materials. They are not able to utilize work force due to frequent power cuts. High population growth in India is helping foreign companies to get cheap work force and high demand for their products. If we control population growth then demand for work force will increase. If people get more wages then they will spend more money and boost our economy. But if our oil imports increases then that will boost economy of Gulf countries only.


    Educated politicians, environmentalists and religious fanatics have some similarities. Most of them have degree in literature or law and only few of them have degree in science or economics. Many people who have degree in literature are helping people by providing them entertainments. Many lawyers are helping poor people to get justice. But instead of using their knowledge to help people, these politicians, environmentalists and religious fanatics are brainwashing illiterate and poor people using sweet words.

    Family Planning in India: Population growth: The root cause of all problems

    NB: My writing skill is not good. But I believe that my points are right.
    LurkerBaba and Raj30 like this.

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    Re: India's Population 2012

    Why they haven't produced the ratio of population in terms of religion so far ??

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    Re: India's Population 2012

    Below graph for demographics of China and India

    The LEFT China, RIGHT India; BLUE bars for Male, ORANGE for Female

    75b9c85cgw1dxj97fomqkj

    Overall speaking India is apparently "younger", of course in face challenges of health care, education and employment for the young. What're India's criteria for "Mid Class"? What's the percentage of Indians who belong to "Middle Class"?

    Congratulations on India overtaking China to have the largest population in the world, SOON

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    Re: India's Population 2012

    Quote Originally Posted by Manas7 View Post
    Why they haven't produced the ratio of population in terms of religion so far ??
    High fertility rate of illiterate and poor Hindus are helping Christian missionaries to convert more people. Its easy to convert poor people with more children by providing them food. But Catholics in states like Kerala are facing problems due to protest against family planning by clergies. On one side they are protesting against family planning and on other side they are protesting against Govt. for increasing aids for Muslims according to their population growth. We should control population growth irrespective of religion.
    @amoy
    Both high population growth of India and one-child policy of China are bad. What we need is a strong two-child policy. China will be forced to hire nurses from abroad in future.

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    Re: India's Population 2012

    Quote Originally Posted by Manas7 View Post
    Why they haven't produced the ratio of population in terms of religion so far ??
    because the govt is afraid that hindus will be frightened by increasing population of muslims .

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    Re: India's Population 2012

    Anyone noticed?

    First it was "Chota parivar, sukhi parivar" - promotion of 1 child

    Then came "hum do, humare do" - promotion of 2 child policy

    Now it is "Dusra bachha teen saal baad" - Promotion of increasing votebank with >= 3 children

    The undertone is that as long as there are 3yr difference between them, its ok. Be it dusra, teesra, chautha or panchwa! After all a woman stays fertile for more than 15yrs in her life!

    Once you rule out the impossible, whatever remains, however improbable, must be the truth.

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    Re: India's Population 2012

    Quote Originally Posted by Vyom View Post
    How long can we sustain such massive population, why is this never an issue in elections?
    Family planning is considered a sin by Christians and Muslims. Hence no party will raise this issue.

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